Humaniq to use blockchain for social good

first_img[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=prEPErb82Mg[/youtube] A London/Luxembourg start-up is planning to use the blockchain to create a new kind of bank that will help tackle global poverty. It will enable people to use its cryptocurrency to donate or lend money, and bring banking services and income generation opportunities to “the last billion”.Humaniq has been developed by a group of people, many with experience in cryptocurrencies, who have seen the potential of biometrics, blockchain and mobile to help solve a number of social and economic problems.The challenge they aim to tackle is considerable. “Over 2 billion people in the world don’t have bank accounts. About 1.5 billion people don’t have any identification documents. They are excluded from the global economy and not reachable or interesting for traditional banks.”Yet Humaniq believes that currently available technology can help resolve this. “All you need to start an account is your face, a simple smartphone and any internet access.”And this is a huge opportunity. These people represent “a billion new potential users and employees connected to [the] global financial ecosystem”.Appropriately enough, Humaniq has been raising funds to help it expand. It did so via an ICO (Initial Coin Offering), inviting people to invest in it and its infrastructure. It has secured $5 million, with over 10,000 people contributing in its first month. The average investment so far as been around $400. The ICO closed at the end of April. In so doing it is creating its own cryptocurrency, the ‘HMQ’.Humaniq’s altcoin will trade on five crypto-currency exchanges. It has also appointed Deloitte to provide it with legal and accounting support.Humaniq is operated as a ‘profit with a purpose’ company, to tackle poverty in emerging economies like Kenya by offering another solution for the people who suffer from financial exclusion, many who live on less than USD$2.50 a day, have no formal identity, little education, and are bankless.Humaniq’s objectivesWhile the ability to donate or lend money is one of the functions of Humaniq, its vision is much larger than that. Specifically it aims to enable the following:Give people a biometric identity who don’t have one.Offer microlending services to people at affordable and fair rates after they establish identityOffer the ability to earn cryptocurrency by doing digital work on their devices (similar to Amazon Mechanical Turk).Offer the ability to convert that cryptocurrency into fiat currency on the ground at real locations.Offer remittance services that will be almost at zero cost and instantly for senders from outside the country.Offer people from the outside the ability to donate or lend money (at zero to fair interest rates) and have a mobile relationship with the people they engage with – to help lift them out of poverty – empowering them. Like Kiva but without the high interest costs of agents in the middle.Provide a strong and unique utility value to the cryptocurrency they issue in the ICO for the initial supporters of the project.Disrupt the incumbents currently clogging up the value chain and offer a leaner, fairer and more honest financial infrastructure that has to potential to lift people out of poverty quickly. Tagged with: blockchain Finance microfinance Interview with Dinis GuardaDinis Guarda: “only charities that ignore new tech will fail”Dinis Guarda is the CEO of Humaniq. He previously founded intelligentHQ.com and socialmediacouncil.eu. He has worked on projects with the UN and governments around the world, as well as a variety of financial, technology and consumer companies such as Reuters, MasterCard, P&G, Philips, Vodafone, and Nike.He told UK Fundraising that he saw a “huge opportunity” to build financial inclusion and as a sustainable service.Even though further funding was being sought, Humaniq’s activities to reach the “one billion unbanked people” were already underway. The mobile app had already been developed and was in use, and projects were taking place in Ghana and Nigeria.Although the blockchain sector was growing rapidly, Guarda did not see competition as a challenge. “We need to work together”, he said, explaining that, where possible, he wished to work with existing players and understand what worked. He saw any potential competitors more as “possible partners”.As part of this need to understand Humaniq is in discussions with a range of national and international NGOs, and has a Save the Children staff member on its advisory board.It has looked at the achievements and approaches of organisations such as Kiva and the microfinance service Grameen Bank, and is keen to make the most of what they have learned, such as the focus on the success of female entrepreneurs.The idea for Humaniq was established only a year ago, with the first team members running a successful pre-ICO funding campaign as recently as December last year.Guarda sees blockchain technology as “more of an enabler than a destroyer”. While it does make it easier, cheaper and perhaps even more transparent for individuals or organisations to transfer money to beneficiaries than via traditional charities, he commented that “only charities that ignore new technology will fail”. He added: “If an NGO builds value it will survive”. Humaniq to use blockchain for social good AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis45 Howard Lake | 2 May 2017 | News Advertisement  171 total views,  1 views today  172 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis45 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Winnie Madikizela-Mandela ¡presente!

first_imgWinifred “Winnie” Mandela, a heroic freedom fighter in the South African anti-apartheid struggle, died at the age of 81 on April 2 in a Johannesburg hospital after a long illness. She was a member of South Africa’s parliament until her death.She was an inspiration to oppressed women worldwide who joined the mass anti-apartheid solidarity movement, including this writer, who was a founding member of the U.S. Out of Southern Africa Network. That organization demanded U.S. corporations divest from the economy of the racist apartheid regime in the mid-1980s.A memorial service for this “Mother of the Nation” will be held in South Africa on April 11. The official national funeral is scheduled for April 14.The African National Congress, the oldest national liberation movement in South Africa and currently part of the ruling government, issued an April 2 statement titled “ANC dips revolutionary banner to Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.” This read in part:“The ANC lowers its revolutionary banner in honour of the memory of this great woman who was so loved and revered, whose name will forever be inscribed in history as having played a formative role in the history of South Africa. We mourn the passing of this great patriot and Pan Africanist, whose resilience and courage inspired freedom struggles not only in South Africa, but across Africa and her diaspora.“Such was her impact as an activist and revolutionary around the world that, until the very end of her life, she was lauded and acknowledged for her contribution to the struggles of all oppressed peoples of the world.“Her early exposure to apartheid in the Village of Mbongweni, Bizana, in the Transkei, where she was born to Columbus and Nomathamsanqa Mzaidume Madikizela on 26 September 1936, inspired in her a lifelong hatred of injustice and racism. It was this early exposure, and later [her experiences] as a young social worker in Johannesburg, that set her on a lifelong path, joining the ranks of celebrated freedom fighters of the African National Congress and the broad liberation movement in the 1950s. She counted amongst her friends and inspiration at the time the likes of Lilian Ngoyi, Helen Joseph, Ma Albertina Sisulu, Florence Matomela, Frances Baard, Kate Molale, Ruth Mompati, Hilda Berstein and Ruth First.“Comrade Madikizela-Mandela was an activist in her own right, and will be remembered for having stood at the forefront of the struggle for women’s rights in South Africa — taking part in a number of demonstrations against the unjust pass laws. When the ANC was banned in South Africa — and the mere mention of the organisation’s name could result in imprisonment — Mama Winnie and countless other dedicated activists kept the flames of resistance burning, speaking out against apartheid, against detentions without trial, against the pass laws, and against the brutality of the apartheid regime. For this she paid a heavy price.“She was first incarcerated in 1958 and over the years would face many more such detentions and banishment including solitary confinement. Despite all these attempts to break her spirit, she remained steadfast and refused to cease with her political activism, displaying exemplary courage that made her a role model for many young women activists in South Africa.Imprisonment, banning, harassment, house arrest, solitary confinement and having her husband and father of her children, Isithwalandwe Tata Nelson Mandela, imprisoned for 27 years, did not break Mama Winnie’s fighting spirit.“We are grateful to her for having bequeathed us a lasting legacy and inspiration to serve our people.”To read the entire statement, go to tinyurl.com/y7a7gvxs.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Cottonseed Issue gets Big Picture Support at AFBF

first_img Previous articleHouse Passes Resolution to Disapprove WOTUSNext articleMorning Outlook Andy Eubank Facebook Twitter By Andy Eubank – Jan 13, 2016 SHARE Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Cottonseed Issue gets Big Picture Support at AFBF Culp on cottonseed supportDuring the Tuesday delegate session at the annual meeting of American Farm Bureau Federation, the issue of designating cottonseed as an oilseed to make it eligible for farm program payments sparked debate, mainly between cotton growers and some in the Midwest. The delegates did vote in favor of new language in Farm Bureau policy to support those designation efforts.“Currently the lint or the fiber of the cotton is much less valuable than what the cottonseed is,” explained Kendell Culp from Jasper County, Indiana Farm Bureau’s new vice president. “So they’re trying to get some program dollars available for the cottonseed, which from a typical Midwestern farmer you would think normally we would be opposed to that because unless there’s more dollars appropriated it will take dollars away from the other program crops such as corn.”But Culp’s approach was to look at the issue from a variety of angles.“It was a rather close vote as far as the amendment, but what I looked at and what I told my members, is there’s the dollar aspect, the WTO concern is, is that going to be eligible in the amber box, but the main thing was if the south loses those cotton acres they’re more likely to be planted to soybeans. That will have an effect on Midwest grain producers.”Culp told HAT he also agreed with the argument that Farm Bureau, as a general farm organization, needs to look at agriculture as an industry rather than cotton as a specific commodity.“If you want to look at it from a specific commodity, no you wouldn’t be supportive of that, but I think we have to support things and look at the big picture. I am aware that the American Soybean Association discussed it at their December meeting and it came down to we’re all part of an industry and there aren’t very many strictly soybean producers in the United States. Most all farmers grow something other than soybeans, and so we need to look beyond just the one industry. We need to look at the big picture, and I think that philosophy was shown out here today as well.”Those from the Midwest are also concerned about the language of support for the oilseed designation helping to reopen the farm bill.Hear more from Culp in the HAT interview:Kendall Culp at AFBF16 SHARE Cottonseed Issue gets Big Picture Support at AFBFlast_img read more

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Fall semester Greek chapter conduct report finds hazing, alcohol violations in 7 organizations

first_img41st Jazz Festival gives guest musicians a chance to perform Michelle Ross Linkedin ReddIt Linkedin Michelle Ross is a senior Journalism and Communication Studies double major from Austin, Texas. When she is not in the newsroom, she loves to dance, go on random adventures and pet dogs on campus. Aardvark closes, Christ Chapel relocates Twitter Rec center app aims to make scheduling workouts easier + posts World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Classroom technology frustrates faculty, students ReddIt Previous articleTCU’s tuition can be steep for families earning less than $100,000 a yearNext articleGreek GPA ranking shows many sororities out preforming fraternities Michelle Ross RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img printTCU students have many experiences that shape their time at school: the supply of free purple t-shirts, memories of Market Square Meals, and for 51 percent of TCU students, greek life, according to the office of Fraternity and Sorority Life.According to the Fraternity and Sorority Life website, “TCU is committed to maintaining high standards for our fraternities and sororities by upholding organization and University policies, procedures and expectations.” This includes the semesterly report on violations by each chapter.The 2017 report found three Greek organizations in violation of the anti-hazing policy at TCU. Delta Delta Delta, Delta Tau Delta and Pi Beta Phi were all found to be in violation of the policy against hazing. There are also state laws that prohibit hazing.In 1987, Texas Legislature enacted an anti-hazing law. The state law provides penal sanctions in the event of a conviction of hazing, the hazing memorandum reports. Texas law defines hazing as “any intentional, knowing or reckless act occurring on or off the campus of an educational institution, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, hold office in or maintaining membership in an organization whose members are or include students at an educational institution.”As such, the University has announced disciplinary actions against each of the chapters in violation.Pi Beta Phi is under an action plan with the headquarters of their national organization. Eily Cummings, senior director of marketing and communications for Pi Beta Phi nationals, said they “strictly prohibit hazing in all of its forms.”“The Fraternity provides an anonymous hazing hotline to its chapter members and requires all members to sign a Statement of Obligations of Membership annually, which includes language on Pi Beta Phi’s anti-hazing policy.”Cummings said that volunteers from nationals will be working with the TCU chapter to further educate members on the seriousness of Pi Beta Phi’s anti-hazing policy.Delta Tau Delta’s chapter on campus was suspended as a result of their hazing violations.“This is a painful but necessary action,” said Jim Russell, Delta Tau Delta national executive vice president. “This chapter, including its leadership, willfully violated not only the Fraternity’s risk management policy but also our stated values. Hazing is an aberration to those values. It cannot and will not be tolerated.”Russell added that the national organization will be working with the collegiate members and has a “strong desire” to return.For Delta Delta Delta, its violation resulted in the chapter being required to “uphold directives set forth by National Headquarters, including regular meetings with chapter leadership, assist with seeking out guest speakers and offering guidance in the formation of committees and newly-developed chapter protocols,” according to the Fraternity and Sorority Life report.Neither the TCU chapter or a representative from Delta Delta Delta nationals responded to a request for an interview.In addition, Sigma Alpha Epsilon was accused of hazing and while there was “insufficient evidence to determine chapter involvement”, two members were expelled from the chapter and a membership review was conducted by a Sigma Alpha Epsilon regional officer.Both Kappa Sigma and Sigma Phi Epsilon received allegations of hazing but were found to not be in violation of the anti-hazing policies.To report any acts of hazing, students can contact the Campus Life -Dean’s Office 817-257-7926, TCU Police 817-257-7777 or the Hazing Hotline 817-257-HAZE, the email reports.In the same report, three organizations, Beta Theta Pi, Lambda Chi Alpha and Sigma Phi Epsilon, were found to be in violation of event hosting or alcohol policies.Beta Theta Pi received sanctions for their national organization and are working on a “plan to ensure the violation will not occur in the future.” According to the FSL report, all sanctions have been completed.Lambda Chi Alpha who were “residents of the home in question should apologize to neighbors” and all members of the fraternity must participate in five hours of community service, two of which must be outside the organization’s designated philanthropy – Feeding America.Sigma Phi Epsilon was not allowed to host any additional fall events and worked with the national organization to “execute an education plan,” including a chapter wise presentation on Sigma Phi Epsilon and TCU risk management policies.The Phi Gamma Delta fraternity was found in violation of social event policy and as a result, lost one social event and imposed self-sanctions, which included the removal of the social chair. The new social chair must meet regularly with an FSL chapter coach.Zeta Tau Alpha sorority received a chapter alcohol violation and received a $500 fine, 100 hours of community service requirement and mandatory completion of an alcohol education program.FSL did not return a request for comment. Michelle Rosshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/michelle-ross/ Michelle Rosshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/michelle-ross/ Twitter Facebook TAGSalcoholFraternityFSLgreek lifehazingsorority Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Photo by TCU Maps Michelle Rosshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/michelle-ross/ TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Michelle Rosshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/michelle-ross/ Facebooklast_img read more

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Plea Of Lack Of Funds Not Legally Tenable In Matters Of Payment Of Pension & Other Post Retirement Benefits: Gauhati HC [Read Order]

first_imgNews UpdatesPlea Of Lack Of Funds Not Legally Tenable In Matters Of Payment Of Pension & Other Post Retirement Benefits: Gauhati HC [Read Order] Akshita Saxena9 Jun 2020 9:32 PMShare This – xIn a significant ruling, the Gauhati High Court has held that the right to receive post retirement benefits is sacrosanct and the same cannot be denied merely because of lack of funds. The bench of Justice Sanjay Kumar Medhi has held, “the plea of lack of funds though may be correct, the same is not legally tenable inasmuch as pension and other post retirement benefits are…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginIn a significant ruling, the Gauhati High Court has held that the right to receive post retirement benefits is sacrosanct and the same cannot be denied merely because of lack of funds. The bench of Justice Sanjay Kumar Medhi has held, “the plea of lack of funds though may be correct, the same is not legally tenable inasmuch as pension and other post retirement benefits are sacrosanct rights earned by an employee by working for a long tenure in a particular organization.” The court observed that in case an employer, in this case the State Housing Board, does not have sufficient funds, it may approach the State Government for the same. “In case of lack of funds, the Housing Board has all the powers and means to approach the State Government to make available such amount of funds to meet the day-to-day functioning and to make payments to its retired employees and other entitlement of the employees,” the order states. The observation has been made in a writ petition filed by retired employees of the Assam State Housing Board, aggrieved by non-payment of post-retial benefits. Standing Counsel S Bora, appearing on behalf of the Housing Board submitted that there was no mala fide intention on their part to deprive of the Petitioners from their post retirement benefits and it was only because lack of funds, that payment of such benefits had been stayed. It was submitted that as and when the funds are available, all the pending dues of the retired employees of the Housing Board would be cleared. Rejecting this argument, the bench emphasized that pension and other post retirement benefits are not bounty; rather, matters of right. It observed, “After retirement, an employee suffers from immense hardships as the regular flow of income stops and only to lead a decent life, the post retirement benefit is granted to an employee. However, if such an employee is deprived of the post retirement benefits, that too, for a long period, it is only not the employee but the entire family would be put to face the grave hardships.” Accordingly, the court directed the Housing Board to make available the post retirement benefits of the Petitioners, within a period of 4 months. It is also made clear that in case of further delay, the amount in question would accrue interest at the rate of 6%. Case Details: Case Title: Nagen Chandra Das v. State of Assam & Ors. (and other connected petitions) Case No.: WP(C) No. 3523/2019 Quorum: Justice Sanjay Kumar Medhi Appearance: Advocate I Choudhury (for Petitioners); Standing Counsel S Bora (for Respondent) Click Here To Download Order Read Order Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Northland Rd, Derry closed due to serious crash

first_img DL Debate – 24/05/21 Twitter Pinterest Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook By News Highland – July 23, 2020 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Google+ Homepage BannerNews Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA center_img Previous articleStay-and-spend initiative to be launched as part of July stimulus packageNext articleCalls for travel green list to be extended News Highland WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Northland Rd, Derry closed due to serious crash WhatsApp Google+ Pinterest The Northland Road in Derry is closed due to a serious road traffic collision at the junction of Rock Road with Northland Road.Police are on scene and diversions are in place.No further details are currently known. News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

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A view from Wolf Mountain

first_imgLatest Stories Book Nook to reopen Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Published 11:00 pm Friday, April 19, 2013 Print Article A view from Wolf Mountain By The Penny Hoarder Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Email the authorcenter_img Wolf Mountain was originally called Dowd Mountain and is certain to be the highest point between Union Springs and the Gulf of Mexico. And, it is possibly the highest point between the Alabama foothills of the Appalachian Mountains and the Gulf.Grady Reeves of Troy has a strong attachment to the old mountain, which features a magnificent view that stretches as far as the eye can see, including Pike, Bullock, Barbour and Montgomery counties.Reeves’ personal history with the mountain goes back to his great-great-great-grandfather who lived in the shadow of the mountain in the Sandfill community, which he homesteaded around 1820. By Jaine Treadwell “The community at the base of the mountain was called Wolf Pit,” Reeves said. “The story of how Wolf Pit got its name was that packs of wolves were killing cows, goats and pigs all across the area. To get ride of the wolves, the men would dig deep pits and bait them with raw meat. The wolves would jump in the pits after the meat and not be able to climb out. The men would stand at the edge of the pits and shoot the captured wolves.”Reeves said several of the wolf pits have been located in the isolated areas at the base of the Wolf Mountain.The wolves and pits are part of the mountain’s local lore but the mountain stands proudly as a place of both geological and military importance.In 1943, perhaps because of its high elevation, Wolf Mountain was chosen as the site for United States Coast and Geodetic Survey Reference Markers. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Sponsored Content The survey markers are objects placed to mark key survey points on the Earth’s surface and are used in geodetic and land surveying. The surveys laid the basis for map-making in the United States and across the world.Reeves said the survey markers were often set in groups.“The groups were used for triangulation,” he said. “There are three brass markers on Wolf Mountain. Wolf No. 1 is set in a low stone pillar and is a mountain landmark. Wolf No. 2 and Wolf No. 3 are set ground level on the mountain. Each one has an arrow that points to the next. That makes it easier to find the primary mark or to replace a marker that has been destroyed.”The survey markers remain as testimony to the mountain’s importance in establishing the angels and distances between various points on Old Mother Earth.Reeves has an ammo crate and shell casings that are physical evidence that the mountaintop was a home base for soldiers during the Korean War.Reeves said the United States Army used the mountaintop as a site for a radar station, probably because of its high elevation. The radar station was manned around the clock with soldiers from nearby Camp Rucker.The soldiers lived in an encampment on the mountaintop and “infiltrated” the mountainside communities, and even took some of the mountain girls as their brides.Sadie Vinson Miller was one of those girls.Miller, who now lives in Dothan, left the Ebenezer community as a soldier’s wife and remembers well when the soldiers set foot on the mountain.“Oh, it was a big thing for us when the soldiers came to live on the mountain,” Miller said. “The soldiers lived up there in big tents but they mingled with us, like they were our next door neighbors. But, they weren’t from around here. There were probably 12 or more of them and they came from places like Tennessee, Washington, North Carolina, California and Massachusetts. We didn’t know what they were doing up there. We just knew they had a radar station.”Having soldiers on the mountain made life “real interesting” for the young women at its base.“We were interested all right,” Miller said, laughing. “The soldiers went off to Troy sometimes but they mainly liked going to the juke joint around home. We just called it Bud Youngblood’s place. He sold beer and cold drinks and had a jukebox, the kind you put money in to play records so you could dance. The soldiers liked shooting craps or whatever you call rolling dice.”Miller, laughingly, admitted that she went to the juke joint a few times, “when I could slip away from my mama.”“But, I had two older brothers so I felt safe at the juke joint,” she said. “When Mama caught me, she didn’t get on me too bad because my brothers were there to look after me.”Miller added, almost as an afterthought, that the soldiers went to church, too … “sometimes.”Sadie Vinson Miller wasn’t the only young woman to slip away to the juke joint. In fact, the path to Bud Youngblood’s place was partially packed by dainty feet.Those same dainty feet made their way to the top of the mountain from time to time, as the young women supper guests of the soldiers.“One of the soldiers was a mighty good cook,” Miller said. “It was pretty steep getting up there to the top of the mountain but then he was a good cook.”The mountaintop was a romantic place, especially as the sun settled in the west.Sadie Vinson Miller also wasn’t the only young woman to marry a mountaintop soldier. She married the soldier from Tennessee.“My first cousin married the soldier from Massachusetts,” she said. “A nurse in Troy married a soldier and they lived down here in Dothan. I saw his name in the obituaries not long ago. Didn’t know they were still here.”Miller said that, as a young girl still in her teens, she was anxious to get away from country life and a handsome, young soldier took her away to the city.“At the time, I didn’t think about how beautiful a place Pike County was and what a wonderful place the mountain was and what an incredible view it was from up there,” Miller said. “But Pike County is a real pretty place and, from the top of ‘Dowd Mountain,’ it seems like you can see the whole world. It’s a beautiful view from up there.” The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… You Might Like Art community gears up for the premiere art and craft festival in central Alabama TroyFest will be held on April 27 and 28, and draws upward of 10,000 people throughout the weekend. The festival… read more Wolf Mountain stands unobtrusively along the fringes of northeastern Pike County. Perhaps, not even the folks who inhabit the communities at its base give much thought to the mountain. After all, it has loomed there longer than memory.But Wolf Mountain is steeped in history and in local lore and, if mountains could talk, oh, the tales it could tell.last_img read more

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Firefighter’s death in Mendocino Complex blaze is 6th this fire season

first_imgMario Tama/Getty Images(Ukiah, Calif) — The largest fire in California history turned deadly on Monday as a firefighter tending the blaze was killed.There were few details on how the firefighter died in the Mendocino Complex Fire, northeast of Ukiah, California. The fire is burning near the Mendocino National Forest, about 140 miles northwest of Sacramento.“The Mendocino Complex Unified Incident Commanders from CAL FIRE, and the United States Forest Service are deeply saddened to report the death of a firefighter on the Mendocino Complex,” CAL FIRE sad in a statement. “Fact finding on the accident is ongoing and notification of the next of kin is in progress. More information will be released as it becomes available.”Officials said the firefighter was from Utah and was injured while working an active part of the fire. He was airlifted to a local hospital where he died from his injuries.The fire became the largest in state history last week, passing the Thomas Fire from December 2017 as it grew to over 283,000 acres. The fire has now grown to over 349,000 acres, but the Ranch Fire — one half of the Mendocino Complex Fire — is up to 59 percent contained.The fire season has already been a hard one for firefighters working dozens of fires, especially in California.Two firefighters were killed in the Ferguson Fire, which began on July 13 in Mariposa County, east of San Jose and burning in part of Yosemite National Park. Brian Hughes was killed on July 29 when he was struck by a falling tree. Hughes was the second firefighter to die in the blaze after Braden Varney was killed July 13.The Carr Fire has been the deadliest of the wildfires to hit the West this season. Three firefighters have died in the blaze, which started on July 23 and has burned through 206,000 acres and destroyed 1,077 homes near Redding in the far northern Shasta County in California.CAL FIRE officially lists two firefighter deaths in the blaze, though San Francisco ABC station KGO reported a third firefighter, Andrew Brake, was killed in a car accident traveling to the fire.Five civilians were killed in the Carr Fire as well, including a worker for Pacific Gas & Electric.Progress has been made, as the Carr Fire is now up to 63 percent contained, according to CAL FIRE.This year has been the deadliest for firefighters since 2008, according to SF Gate.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Oxford JCRs show solidarity with George Floyd protests

first_imgA number of JCRs have proposed and passed motions in solidarity with George Floyd and ensuing protests in the United States.  Wadham’s motion, as with those of other colleges, notes that “Police brutality is not confined to America but materially impacts Black British people and this includes Wadham students.” “More and more JCRs are standing in international solidarity to demand justice against these systems of racial violence. If your JCR hasn’t yet done so, I would urge to consider raising a motion.” So far St. Anne’s, Wadham, St. Hilda’s, Regent’s Park, Christ Church, Worcester and St Catz are among the JCRs which have submitted motions for their 6th week JCR meetings. As of the evening of Sunday 31 May, Regent’s Park, St. Hilda’s and Keble are among those which have passed their motions.  Wadham SU, made up of both undergraduate and graduate students, was the first to propose a motion, which proposed committing £500 from their charity fund to the Freedom Fund. The SU has also submitted a second motion in support of the National Lawyers Guild.  “The system of carceral violence we are witnessing in America right now is the legacy of such slavery, and so Oxford is intimately tied to issues of racial justice whether we choose to acknowledge this or not. St Catz’s motion is to pass a letter of solidarity with the protesters, as their constitution prevents direct donation. St. Hilda’s JCR amended their motion to increase the College’s donation from £450 to £499 in support of the Minnesota Freedom Fund; Christ Church has committed £720 to the Black Visions Collective, Reclaim The Block, and the Minnesota Freedom Fund; Regent’s Park JCR has committed £50 in support of the National Lawyers Guild; Worcester has committed £200 to the Black Visions Collective, and Keble has committed £500 to National Lawyers Guild. Henna Khanom, who proposed Wadham’s motion, from which many JCRs have adapted their own motions, stated: “Standing up against police brutality and systematic racism is especially important for Oxford colleges given Oxford’s history, having profited off transatlantic slavery from the likes of Codrington at All Souls to Burge at Wadham. The JCR motions pledge to donate to organisations including the Minnesota Freedom Fund and the National Lawyers Guild. Both the MFF and the NLG use funds to pay for the bail of those who have been arrested, as well as other legal costs.  Image credit to Phil Roeder / Wikimedia Commons. This article was edited at 21.50 to include Worcester in the list of colleges who have passed motions. Protests broke out in the US and worldwide after the killing of George Floyd, an African-American man, while in police custody. Protests have also occurred in the UK throughout Sunday. last_img read more

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Check your waste line

first_imgIf you’ve used sales predictions and discounted food that’s nearing it’s sell-by date, but there’s still stacks of unsold sandwiches and cakes, then there’s only one thing for it: chuck it away.Most councils offer a paid-for commercial waste collection,while there are plenty of smaller disposal companies around, but food waste will generally end up in landfill and it’s not a cheap option. New rules mean it now costs businesses £48 for each tonne of waste sent to landfill, which will rise by another £8 each year until April 2013.In fact, Envirowise reckons the cost of producing waste can be between 4-10% of turnover for food and drink manufacturers, so maybe it’s time to think before you bin?Most big waste management companies will conduct a free waste audit for you, but an increasingly high-profile alternative to landfill is anaerobic digestion (AD). This provides a source of renewable energy, since food waste is broken down to produce bio-gas, which can be used to generate electricity and heat; 90% of the electricity generated from AD is exported to the national grid, with the rest used to power AD plants. You’re left with organic fertiliser, which can be spread on land where wheat and oilseed rape is grown. So your old loaves end up making new ones.Biogen Greenfinch takes waste from bakers, including Greggs, to one of its three plants and boasts that for every tonne of food waste sent to AD rather than landfill, 905kg of carbon emissions is saved. Simon Musther, head of commercial operations, says: “It’s cost-effective compared to other waste treatments and protects companies from the ongoing rise in landfill tax.”He believes AD will make even more financial sense as local authorities reduce their budgets and, at some point in the future, the government will legislate to ban organic waste going to landfill. “Companies need to look at alternatives now,” he says.Biogen Greenfinch provides bins, and can pick up from any sized retailer or manufacturer. It can separate packaging and can even cope with raw meat, which is currently banned in landfill.The British Retail Consortium reports that it works out cheaper to separate food waste and send it for anaerobic digestion than sending it to landfill, but a spokesman says: “You need access to one of these services and chances are that a smaller retailer will just put the stuff in a bin, as they won’t have the volume to make it feasible.”However, there are alternatives which can be better for the environment and good for your conscience too. The Fare Share charity collects ’fit-for-purpose’ food from shops and manufacturers and redistributes it to vulnerable groups, such as homeless people, the elderly and children. It covers 60 cities and London boroughs and is becoming more recognised, according to CEO Tony Lowe. It charges for pick-ups, but insists that this is cheaper than destroying food waste. Adds Lowe: “It’s likely that the food will be used in a baker’s local neighbourhood, while eating the food will have less carbon impact than destroying it.”It takes food within date and can make pick-ups every day. “We might take a couple of trays of loaves if it were geographically sustainable but will negotiate some bigger companies deliver to our depots.”Baynes Bakery in Fife has been working with the charity for two years, which bakery general manager George MacKay says began when they decided to reduce what went into landfill. “We give them rolls or tea bread we produce large quantities, so it’s impossible to get figures exactly right every day. It’s a good thing to do, rather than throw food in the bin.” Top tips for reducing bakery waste 1. Buy and use only what you need and plan your deliveries, so you always have just enough to meet customer demand.2. Store food and ingredients at the correct temperature to prolong their life.3. Rather than throw away imperfect baked goods, sell them at a discount or break them up to use for customer tastings.4. Reduce the cost of bakery products towards the end of the day.5. Can you reuse any leftovers? Off-cuts or stale bread as long as it is still edible can be crumbed and toasted as part of a topping. Or turn them into bread and butter pudding.6. If you have good-quality leftovers, particularly cakes or tarts, give them to a local charity or community group. 7. If you still have food waste, contact the local council to see if there is a local food waste collection scheme. Source: WasteWatchlast_img read more

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