Aviva Premiership Previews for this weekend

first_imgSaturday 8th January – Gloucester Rugby v Exeter Chiefs (Kingsholm 3pm)TV: Not LiveReferee: Martin Fox (62nd Premiership game)Gloucester Rugby have lost their last two matches in all competitions but have not lost three in a row since November 2009. Gloucester are unbeaten at Kingsholm in the Premiership since Wasps were the visitors on 24 October 2009.Exeter Chiefs have slipped to successive defeats in Aviva Premiership Rugby, although have managed to tally at least one league point in six of their last seven matches.The Chiefs won 22-10 when the two teams met at Sandy Park in round one, but have lost on both of their previous visits to Kingsholm for a competitive match – in the cup in 1982 and 2002.Saturday 8th January – Leicester Tigers v Northampton Saints (Welford Road, 5pm)TV: Live on Sky SportsReferee: Dave Pearson (150th Premiership game)Leicester Tigers hit the top of the Aviva Premiership Rugby table following their victory at Exeter on Sunday, a spot previously held by the Saints since round eight. The Tigers have lost only one of their last seven matches in all competitions.Northampton Saints slipped up at home to Harlequins on New Year’s Day but have not lost successive encounters since April. The Saints are unbeaten in their last five away games in all competitions.The last six clashes between the two great East Midlands adversaries have all been won by the home side on the day, including the 27-19 Saints victory at Franklin’s Gardens in round one. Northampton are going for a first season’s league double over the Tigers since 2003/04.Dave Pearson becomes just the second referee after Chris White to take charge of 150 Premiership matches.Sunday 9th January – Saracens v London Irish (Vicarage Road, 3pm)TV: No live coverageRefere: David Rose (82nd Premiership game)Saracens’ patchy recent form continued with their 22-28 reversal at the hands of Sale Sharks on Sunday – a run which has seen them claim a won 3, lost 3 record from their last six Aviva Premiership Rugby matches. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS London Irish have slipped from the top of the table in round seven to now sit in fifth place, picking up just one league point from their last five matches, representing their poorest run in the Premiership since season 1997/98.The Exiles won 33-16 when the two clubs met at Twickenham in the London Double Header in September, but have not achieved a league double over Saracens since 2005/06.center_img Aviva Premiership PreviewsLeicester Tigers hit the top of the Aviva Premiership Rugby table following their victory at Exeter on Sunday, a spot previously held by the Northampton Saints since round eight, their opponents on Saturday on what is the game of the round. The Tigers have lost only one of their last seven matches in all competitions, while Northampton Saints slipped up at home to Harlequins on New Year’s Day but have not lost successive encounters since April. The home side almost always wins this encounter between the fierce East Midlands rivals so the Tigers will be favourites, but only just from a Northampton side that is smarting from their shock defeat last weekend. And if you are without satellite tv don’t forget you can tune into ITV4 at 10pm on Sunday evenings for their highlights show.FIXTURESFriday 7th January – Newcastle Falcons v Sale Sharks (Kingston Park, 7.45pm)TV: Live ESPN HDReferee: Tim Wigglesworth (29th Premiership game)Newcastle Falcons’ only victory in their last eight Aviva Premiership Rugby encounters was 12-6 at home to Gloucester on 21 November. The Falcons have won their last three home games in all competitions, although because of the inclement weather the most recent of those was played “over the border” in Galashiels.Sale Sharks ended a five game losing run in all competitions with their 28-22 victory at home to Saracens on Sunday. The Sharks have recorded just one win away from home in the Premiership since November 2009: 6-3 at Leeds on 22 October.Sale won 35-18 when the two teams met in round one and are going for a first ever league double over the Falcons in the same season. The Sharks’ only previous win at Kingston Park came in 2008.Saturday 8th January – Bath Rugby v Leeds Carnegie (Recreation Ground, 2.15pm)TV: Not LiveReferee: JP Doyle (19th Premiership game)Bath Rugby’s five game losing run came to an end at London Irish on New Year’s Day, whilst Bath’s only win at the Rec in any competition since September was 29-19 over Cardiff Blues in the Anglo-Welsh Cup on 5 November.Leeds Carnegie began 2011 in the best possible way with a maiden season’s victory in Aviva Premiership Rugby at home against Gloucester. Leeds have won their last three matches in all competitions.Bath have won their last six encounters with Leeds in all competitions, whilst Leeds have not won at the Rec since 25 November 2005.Saturday 8th January – Harlequins v London Wasps (Twickenham Stoop, 2.45pm)TV: Live on Sky SportsReferee: Wayne Barnes (88th Premiership game)Harlequins have won their last four games in all competitions and on Sunday became the first team this season to defeat Northampton on their own patch. Quins’ only home loss since February 2010 was 16-20 to Northampton on 11 September.London Wasps have lost just one of their last eight matches in all competitions: 6-13 against Saracens at Wembley Stadium on Boxing Day.Harlequins have not beaten Wasps since November 2008, although the two clubs did draw 29-all at Twickenham in round one of Aviva Premiership Rugby.last_img read more

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Keith Earls gets the nod for Ireland against Wales

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS IRELAND TEAM TO PLAY WALES AT AVIVA STADIUM ON SUNDAY 5 FEBRUARY, KICK-OFF 3pm Lucky 13: Keith Earls scores against Wales at the World Cup – can he do the same on Sunday?MUNSTER’S Keith Earls will fill Brian O’Driscoll’s famous No 13 shirt for Ireland against Wales on Sunday afternoon.Ireland’s legendary skipper O’Driscoll is ruled out for the entire RBS 6 Nations campaign and Earls, who has more often played on the wing for Ireland, has been handed the responsibility of filling those talismanic shoes. He beat off the challenges of Fergus McFadden and Tommy Bowe to move into the outside-centre berth alongside Gordon D’Arcy.Declan Kidney has made just two other changes from the starting XV that lost to Wales in the World Cup quarter-final – Andrew Trimble comes onto the wing to replace Earls and Jonathan Sexton wins the battle for the No 10 jersey ahead of Ronan O’Gara.Man at No 10: Jonathan SextonThe pack is unchanged and the front row of Cian Healy, Rory Best and Mike Ross will be looking to get the better of a Welsh scrum missing Lions Gethin Jenkins and Matthew Rees. Back-rowers Stephen Ferris, Sean O’Brien and Jamie Heaslip will also be looking to get across the gain-line having been closed down by Wales in Wellington last October. NOT FOR FEATURED Rob Kearney; Tommy Bowe, Keith Earls, Gordon D’Arcy, Andrew Trimble; Jonathan Sexton, Conor Murray; Cian Healy, Rory Best, Mike Ross, Donncha O’Callaghan, Paul O’Connell, Stephen Ferris, Sean O’Brien, Jamie Heaslip.Replacements: Sean Cronin, Tom Court, Donnacha Ryan, Peter O’Mahony, Eoin Reddan, Ronan O’Gara, Fergus McFadden.last_img read more

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Ryan Walkinshaw – reaching for the stars

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ryan Walkinshaw has a passion for science as well as rugbyBy Katie Field, Rugby World writerRYAN WALKINSHAW is younger and slicker than your average Aviva Premiership chairman but don’t be fooled into thinking he is frivolous or in any way naïve. The 24-year-old Gloucester boss is actually a deep thinker with a wider agenda than rugby and his other sporting business interest, motor racing.Walkinshaw is passionate about physics and taught himself astronomy, cosmology and particle physics after dropping out of his business degree in Newcastle. “I read Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time when I was about 17 and it blew my mind. At school I had thought physics was a bit geeky and not really up my alley but I read that book out of interest one summer and it changed my outlook,” he says.“Most of what I want to do with the money I earn from business is invest in scientific research – space projects. A lot of private firms are involved in that now because governments are not putting the money in anymore.” Walkinshaw is particularly interested in the impact science can have on solving the world’s energy problems.“I have learned a huge amount about nuclear fusion and I believe that’s the way forward if we are going to power our planet without destroying it. Renewable energy sources we are using and looking into now are only half the picture.center_img “At the moment in this country we spend more money every year on buying novelty ring-tones for our phones than we do on nuclear fusion research.”So, while his immediate priority is ensuring Gloucester win some major rugby silverware in the next few years, he has one eye on a much bigger picture, and it can’t be a bad thing for the Kingsholm club to have someone like that at the helm. “I want to have a direct impact on changing the world for the better,” he says. “I genuinely believe if you are not dreaming about tomorrow you are never going to get there.”last_img read more

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England v Fiji: The Preview

first_imgReplacements: Seremaia Naureure, Setafano Samoca, Manasa Saulo, Sekonaia Kalou, Iliesa Ratuva, Kelemedi Bola, Josh Matavesi, Ravai Fatiaki.Referee: Glen Jackson (New Zealand) TAGS: Fiji New faces: England will field one of their least experienced line-ups of the pro era against Fiji this weekendBy Alan Pearey, Rugby World Deputy EditorEVEN THE most optimistic of souls in the visitors’ camp would be hard pressed to make a case for a Fijian victory at Twickenham this weekend, one of 30 Tests being played by 23 countries in a hectic three-week period.England have never failed to beat Fiji by a double-figure margin and the vastness of their resources is illustrated by the back row, where the likes of Tom Wood, Tom Croft, Phil Dowson, James Haskell and Steffon Armitage are among those not required for duty.Yet the pressure is on England to make a statement, and not just because the match will be the first to attract an 82,000 sell-out crowd at Twickenham against a second-tier nation. England’s world ranking of fourth is on the line this month – France will leapfrog them this weekend if they beat Australia – and Stuart Lancaster’s team have a tricky balance to strike: on the one hand, they will want to develop the fearless and liberating style that briefly reared its head under Martin Johnson two years ago, and which could put the SANZAR superpowers under stress in the weeks ahead; on the other hand, they will want to keep things tight against a country whose love of the open spaces is world-renowned.Flood: nearing 250-point milestoneHalf-back hubEngland field one of their most inexperienced teams of the pro era, with only six of the starters having won more than ten caps. Only at half-back, where Toby Flood and Danny Care have won 83 caps between them, is there a genuine wealth of proven Test know-how. Flood requires seven points to break the 250-point barrier.Chris Ashton, Dylan Hartley and Jonathan Joseph would all have started had injury or suspension not intervened and all may be missed. Bar one World Cup warm-up, Ashton has been an ever-present since making his debut in March 2010 and, now rejuvenated at Saracens, his nose for a try would have been a boon for an England side that has scored a lowly 12 tries in eight Tests under Lancaster.Joseph’s absence means England’s midfield, Manu Samoa and Brad Barritt, looks a shade one-dimensional, and the knock-on effect is the selection of a creative ball-player at full-back in Alex Goode, who is comfortable as a first receiver.Aggrieved islandersTom Youngs’s selection at hooker, after a mere nine outings in the position at Leicester, would be a high-risk strategy were England not playing a Fijian team whose preparations – not for the first time – have been hampered. Less than a third of the 30-plus eligible players participating in Europe’s three major leagues are in their tour squad, as stories surface of players being blackmailed into refusing a national call-up in order to be available for their club. Clermont’s Noa Nakaiaci and Racing’s Virimi Vakatawa declined invitations while Fiji have complained to the French federation after Racing’s Jone Qovu withdrew.Goneva: facing Tigers team-mate TuilagiTheir team for Twickenham contains two news caps in lock Pisa Ratuniyarawa and wing Samu Wara, but there are familiar faces too: Scarlets prop Deacon Manu leads a side with an all-Premiership midfield in Sireli Naqelevuki (Exeter) and Vereniki Goneva (Leicester), while Gloucester’s Akapusi Qera brings his big-hitting form to the back row. The game is a true clash between the haves and have-nots. Nicky Little, the former Fiji fly-half, tells how a friend of his earned £15,000 for a Six Nations win with England; Fiji’s daily allowance is £17, though it doubles on overseas tours. With sell-outs on the next four Saturdays, England expect to make more than £17m in profit from their QBE international series.Hospital passThe match has another added curiosity as, two years after nearly kicking Saracens to the English title at the ground, New Zealand Glen Jackson is back for his Test debut as a referee. It seems a very short while ago that I saw him referee, as a novice, at the Sussex Open Sevens at Christ’s Hospital, the school that, coincidently, provided a sporting and academic education for Joe Launchbury – set to make his England debut off the bench this weekend. How time flies.Prediction: Expect England to be a little disjointed but still pile on the points. They should win by 20.ENGLAND v FIJI, Saturday 10 November, 2.30pm, Twickenham, Live on Sky Sports 1ENGLAND: Alex Goode; Charlie Sharples, Manu Samoa, Brad Barritt, Ugo Monye; Toby Flood, Danny Care; Joe Marler, Tom Youngs, Dan Cole, Tom Palmer, Geoff Parling, Tom Johnson, Chris Robshaw (captain), Thomas Waldrom.Replacements: David Paice, David Wilson, Mako Vunipola, Joe Launchbury, Tom Wood, Ben Youngs, Owen Farrell, Mike Brown.FIJI: Simeli Koniferedi; Samu Wara, Vereniki Goneva, Sireli Naqelevuki, Watisoni Votu; Metuisela Talebula, Nikola Matawalu; Pen Makutu, Viliame Veikoso, Deacon Manu (captain), Leone Nakarawa, Apisolame Ratuniyarawa, Api Naikatini, Malakai Ravulo, Akapusi Qera. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Italy full-back Jayden Hayward

first_imgThis article originally appeared in the March 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. The Benetton and Italy back talks sweeping, sparkies and swimming with sharks What angers you? Stealing winds me up. Taking personal stuff really gets me.What’s the worst job you’ve ever had? It would be sweeping the floors. In New Zealand I worked at a furniture place and after school, for an hour and a half, I used to go there to sweep the floors. Maybe that’s where my obsession with cleaning dirt came from.If you could have any three dream dinner party guests, who would you choose? There’s no one like Michael Jackson. He was a very talented singer and an artist. I’d have Bob Marley for the same reason. And the third would be Bear Grylls. I’d pick his brains and figure out how to survive if I ever got isolated in the world.Dinner guest? TV adventurer Bear Grylls (Getty Images)What superpower would you like? To be able to look young forever. When you get older, everything sags and you get wrinkles, so that’d be a good one.What do you do to relax? Watch TV, Netflix, but also go to the park and play with my son. On holidays I just want a sunny destination to enjoy family time.Do you have any phobias? Sharks. I actually went cage diving in South Africa. I was always scared but once I’d done that I realised I was a lot more scared of them than I’d thought. Seeing them move so effortlessly in the water, how big they are, then seeing them face to face…What would you like to achieve outside rugby? I’m a qualified electrician, so after rugby I’d like to get back into that side of stuff. I left home at almost 21. I’m 33 so by the time I go back home it will have been 13-14 years. I’d like to be successful with that and life after rugby.More players should learn trades. It’s easier to do it straight after school if you can, but people should look into it. With something to fall back on, hopefully they will be more successful later in life. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Making a point: Jayden Hayward issues instructions during an Italy match (Getty Images) Downtime with… Italy full-back Jayden HaywardWhat did you make of Italy when you first moved over? It’s a beautiful setting in Treviso and obviously the lifestyle’s very good, the food and wine. When I first came over here I didn’t know what to expect because back in New Zealand I didn’t know Italy played rugby, as narrow-minded as it sounds. It wasn’t until I started doing my research, looking into it, that I saw they’re a proud rugby nation.With the cuisine, is it hard staying in decent nick? I’m pretty lucky in that department – I can pretty much eat what I want and it doesn’t go anywhere. I’ve got a fast metabolism. My wife is a lovely cook and she keeps me in shape.Who is your funniest team-mate? The Honey Badger, Nick Cummins. I played with him at the Force in Australia and it was just the conversations you’d have with him. They’re just not your normal conversations, like, you’d be talking about space and what’s out there. You just have to look at him and you laugh.Funny man: Former Wallaby wing Nick Cummins (Getty Images)Any pranks you can share? At the World Cup there were a lot of pranks. From going into people’s rooms and bed flipping, taking everything out of their bags, to putting rotten food underneath the pillows. You just have to be very, very careful about who your roomie is and try not to leave your doors open.How about nicknames? I’ve had a couple of nicknames. In New Zealand I had Ball Bags. Not because I’ve got a big one but it was just a name that stuck with everyone back home in club rugby. And then when I went to the Force I had Hundy. They called me that because they reckoned that I wasn’t 100% all there! My name, Jayden, is pretty hard to say for Italians so they just call me Jay here.If your house was on fire and everyone was okay, what one item would you save? I would save my wedding album. Just because I wouldn’t be able to replace the photos.If you could be any team-mate, who would you be? Braam Steyn, because he’s got a good body and he plays in the back row. I wouldn’t want to be in the tight five, that would be horrendous.What’s your guilty pleasure?My wife reckons I have an obsession with vacuuming the house! It’s not at three in the morning, but I have one of those electric vacuum cleaners and if I see a bit of dirt on the floor then I have to vacuum it up.I also have an internet addiction for looking at cars, motorbikes or houses online. I have to be looking at something!last_img read more

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La iglesia de la Trinidad en Wall Street auspicia asamblea…

first_img Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT La iglesia de la Trinidad en Wall Street auspicia asamblea por el 1º. de Mayo Manifestantes del movimiento Ocupar marchan hasta el parquet Zuccotti Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN [Episcopal News Service] Durante su comparecencia en “Ocupar: asamblea del 1º. de Mayo”, transmitida en directo vía Internet desde la iglesia de la Trinidad en Wall Street, el Rdo. Mark Francisco Bozzuti-Jones describió el Ocupar Wall Street como un movimiento que él habría querido que la iglesia de la Trinidad hubiera tenido el “valor” y la “perspicacia” de originar.“Es mucho de lo que somos… no sólo [la iglesia de] la Trinidad de Wall Street, toda la empresa espiritual”, dijo Bozzuti-Jones durante la transmisión.Parafraseando al teólogo jesuita Jon Sobrino, la auténtica prueba no es tanto acerca de si una persona cree en Dios o no, sino más bien si cree en idolatría, dijo. Para Sobrino, la voluntad humana tendía a adorar las cosas erróneas.“¿Cómo enseñarle al mundo que es mejor dar que recibir?”, preguntó Bozzuti-Jones.Anunciada en parte como conferencia, en parte como renovación espiritual y en parte como una concentración, el “Ocupar: asamblea del 1 de mayo” incluyó breves pláticas por pensadores religiosos y seculares que hablaron acerca de problemas morales, políticos y de justicia social y reconciliación que confronta el movimiento Ocupar.El evento también incluyo música popular interpretada por el dúo Peader & Pio.Charles B. Strozier, profesor del Colegio Universitario de Derecho Penal John Jay, fue el maestro de ceremonias del evento. Además de Bozutti-Jones, entre los oradores se contaron el Rdo. James Forbes, ministro emérito de la iglesia Riverside de Nueva York; el Dr. Robert Jay Lifton, autor y psiquiatra de la Escuela de Medicina de Harvard; Blanche Wiesen Cook, también profesora del Colegio Universitario de Derecho Penal John Jay; Diego Ibáñez y Bryan K. Parsons del movimiento Ocupar Wall Street; Joyce Carol Oates, escritora y profesora de la Universidad de Princeton; el Rdo. James H. Cooper, rector de la iglesia de la Trinidad en Wall Street; la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori y James W. Jones, profesor de la Universidad de Rutgers.El Día 1 de mayo, o Día Internacional de los Trabajadores, es una celebración de movimientos obreros e izquierdistas que tiene sus raíces en la masacre de Haymarket, Chicago, en 1886, cuando, luego de haber sido alcanzados por una bomba, la policía disolvió una huelga general de trabajadores que abogaban por una jornada laboral de ocho horas. La fecha se convirtió en una efeméride reconocida internacionalmente en 1890.El 1 de mayo, Ocupar Wall Street convocó a una huelga general -no trabajo, no escuela, no tiendas- para conmemorar el Día del Trabajo e inyectar nueva vida al movimiento que provocó protestas en todo el país contra la injusticia económica en septiembre de 2011. De la noche a la mañana, barricadas humanas subieron a lo largo de Broadway en el Bajo Manhattan y a lo largo de Wall Street e inmediatamente se apostaron frente al edificio de la Bolsa de Nueva York en la esquina de las calles Wall y Broad, a una cuadra de la iglesia de la Trinidad. Los eventos de Ocupar para el 1 de mayo se planearon para todo el país.En su página web, la iglesia de la Trinidad describe Ocupar como “…tal vez uno de los movimientos más importantes desde los movimientos pro derechos civiles y antibélicos de los años cincuenta y sesenta”.La asamblea de la Trinidad, programada originalmente como un evento público, se cambió a una transmisión en directo vía Internet cuando, según un comunicado en el calendario de la Trinidad, la alcaldía de Nueva York alertó que probablemente habría grandes multitudes y que se producirían interrupciones en el transporte público en el Bajo Manhattan el martes por la tarde. Los partidarios de Ocupar, entre ellos algunos clérigos episcopales que participan activamente en el movimiento interreligioso OcupyFaith NYC, se disponían a desfilar “en solidaridad” desde Union Square hasta el parque Zuccotti a las 5:30 P.M. hora del Este.Dada la situación de la iglesia de la Trinidad, en la intersección de Broadway con Wall Street, dos cuadras al sur del parque Zuccotti, espacio de propiedad privada donde los ocupas acamparon durante dos meses el otoño pasado, la iglesia ha sido parte de la historia de Ocupar desde el comienzo, a veces abriendo sus puertas a los miembros del movimiento y sus partidarios.Durante su plática, Cooper reconoció algunos de los tensos momentos vividos a lo largo del camino, que incluyeron huelgas de hambre y arrestos. En medio de todo eso, la Trinidad y los partidarios de Ocupar pudieron, no obstante, reunirse para conversar, dijo Cooper, ya fuese de manera informal, conversaciones tarde en la noche en el banco de un parque, o durante un oficio el domingo por la mañana.Luego de que los ocupantes fueran desalojados del parque el 15 de noviembre de 2011, la iglesia de la Trinidad fue objeto de críticas de los partidarios del movimiento -entre ellos algunos clérigos episcopales- por no haberles cedido una espacio propiedad de la iglesia, adyacente a la Duarte Square, un parque de la ciudad situado en las calles Canal, Grand y la Ave. De las Américas. La disputa sobre el acceso a la propiedad de la Trinidad, que Ocupar quería usar como base desde la cual capear los meses de invierno, culminó con una huelga de hambre llevada a cabo por tres o cuatro personas asociadas con el movimiento y el arresto de clérigos episcopales, entre ellos el obispo jubilado George E. Packard, cuando saltaron la cerca durante una manifestación, el 17 de diciembre de 2011, para conmemorar los tres meses de que surgiera el movimiento.Uno de los que estaba en huelga de hambre, el boliviano Diego Ibáñez -que grabó sus propios comentarios en una grabadora digital debido, según dijo, a problemas de confianza habidos en el pasado con la iglesia de la Trinidad- habló de la belleza de participar en algo donde “puedas dejar de ser ante algo más grande que tú”.Refiriéndose al alto número de personas encarceladas, especialmente personas de color, culpó a las generaciones anteriores por dejar a Estados Unidos, de cierta manera, peor de lo que nunca ha estado antes.Para él, agregó, [el movimiento] Ocupar le dio a la gente la posibilidad de participar en el cambio social de manera diferente a lo que propone 401 C3, organización que solicita de los ricos donaciones deducibles de impuestos. Él criticó a la Trinidad -uno los mayores propietarios de terrenos en Manhattan- por no ofrecerle a Ocupar un espacio cuando el campamento fue desalojado del parque Zuccotti, y por no dejar que su compañero participara en la asamblea aunque, como señaló, sobraba espacio (Después que el evento comenzó a transmitirse vía Internet, a los miembros del público se les impidió que asistieran en persona).Al concluir sus comentarios, Ibáñez, que ha estado durmiendo en sofás desde que lo desalojaron del parque Zuccotti, retó a todos los presentes y a los que estaban mirando por Internet, a preguntarse que estaban haciendo “para , “derribar las fronteras [que los separan] de las personas a su alrededor”.“Todos nosotros podemos ser radicales”, dijo.En una plática acerca de “Economía bíblica”, grabada vía Skype, la obispa primada habló de cómo la “ética cristiana fundamental exige el cuidado de los pobres”.“Los pobres son los prójimos con menores opciones -respecto a qué comer, dónde vivir, qué clase de empleo buscar, dónde enviar a sus hijos a la escuela, si es que los envían, o dónde encontrar atención médica. La antigua expectativa moral consiste en proporcionar dignidad, apoyo y opciones básicas a aquellos con poca capacidad de encontrar su camino en el mundo”, afirmó.Joyce Carol Oates, que creció en la pobreza en el interior del estado de Nueva York, encomió al movimiento Ocupar por su “visión” y su “pasión”, y habló acerca de su experiencia personal: como recibir una beca de $500 de los Regentes de Nueva York la ayudaron a pagar sus estudios universitarios, y cómo, al sindicalizarse, lo obreros de la fábrica donde trabajaba su padre adquirieron alguna sensación de seguridad.Sin embargo, pese a la encomiable visión y pasión, lo práctico es un reto mucho mayor para Ocupar, dijo Oates.Ella animó a [los integrantes del movimiento] Ocupar a llegar, sin antagonismos, a la gente del Medio Oeste y del Sur que, según dijo, votan contra sus propios intereses, así como a otras personas, para que voten por políticos que “simpaticen con la causa”.— Lynette Wilson es redactora/reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente EcherriEn inglés: http://bit.ly/IsliyH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Por Lynette WilsonPosted May 4, 2012 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

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Provide clergy, laity training to prevent violence, say Anglican women

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, Tags Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Women’s Ministry Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Anglican Communion News Service] Women from around the Anglican Communion have called for clergy and laity to receive training to “recognize violence and to address it effectively.”In a statement from the Anglican delegation to the U.N.’s Commission of the Status of Women, the international group urged the churches of the Anglican Communion to do whatever they could to address violence against women and girls in their communities.“It is a proven fact that violence against women and girls adversely impacts all of society,” the statement said.“Violence against women and girls is a cause and consequence of gender inequality and gender injustice, compounded by numerous forms of discrimination. The church worldwide must be part of the solution.”The delegation of Anglican women from 16 countries around the world urged all churches of the Anglican Communion:1. to continue and build on the positive work already being undertaken towards the eradication of violence against women and girls;2. where silence and inaction persist, to end it. Speak out and begin the work;3. to include men and boys as an integral part of seeking solutions to, and eradicating violence against women and girls;4. to implement Anglican Consultative Council Resolutions 15.07 on gender-based and domestic violence1 and 15.10 on the trafficking of persons;5. to encourage churches at parish level to become places of refuge and safety and participate actively in addressing violence against women and girls; and6. to create awareness and provide training for clergy and the laity to recognize violence and to address it effectively.For the full statement see below. Statement from the Anglican Communion Delegation at the 57th Session of theUnited Nations Commission on the Status of Women, March 2013A Call to Raise our Voices; Faith in ActionLearn to do right; seek justice. Defend the oppressed.Take up the cause of the fatherless; plead the case of the widow.Isaiah 1.17We, the Anglican Communion delegation of women from 16 countries, gathered in New York, 4 to 15 March 2013, to participate in the 57th session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UN CSW57). The priority theme for UN CSW57 was ‘The Elimination and Prevention of All Forms of Violence against Women and Girls’.As women of faith and representing the diversity of the Anglican family of Churches, we observed the proceedings of UN CSW57 and listened to a wide range of speakers. Where possible we met face to face with our country missions to the UN in order to advocate directly with them on behalf of women and girls in our different regions. We also participated in a full programme of UN and non-governmental side events dedicated to the priority theme. These meetings and side events gave us an opportunity to learn, and to share insights and concerns from our home contexts with government representatives, members of other church and faith traditions and non-governmental organisations, We were also able to share with others the progress we have made in many of our Churches, where leaders have spoken out and championed the work needed to end violence against women and girls and care for survivors, and where resources have been developed to assist our moving forward.We thank God for the progress we have made. However, violence against women and girls continues as a global and often hidden pandemic.Women and girls make up more than half the world’s population but many of them live in the shadow of violence and abuse with up to seven in ten women having undergone physical and/or sexual violence. Violence against women and girls takes on multiple forms – physical, sexual, psychological, social and economic, and includes interpersonal/domestic violence, rape, human trafficking, female genital mutilation and forced prostitution. It is a proven fact that violence against women and girls adversely impacts all of society. Violence against women and girls is a cause and consequence of gender inequality and gender injustice, compounded by numerous forms of discrimination.The Church worldwide must be part of the solution. We therefore urge all the Churches of the Anglican Communion:1. to continue and build on the positive work already being undertaken towards the eradication of violence against women and girls2. where silence and inaction persist, to end it. Speak out and begin the work.3. to include men and boys as an integral part of seeking solutions to, and eradicating violence against women and girls4. to implement Anglican Consultative Council Resolutions 15.07 on gender-based and domestic violence1 and 15.10 on the trafficking of persons25. to encourage churches at parish level to become places of refuge and safety and participate actively in addressing violence against women and girls6. to create awareness and provide training for clergy and the laity to recognize violence and to address it effectively.We draw attention to existing resources around the Anglican Communion to facilitate and empower churches in their work towards eradicating violence against women and girls. We affirm that all people are made in the image of God and that violence against women and girls mars God’s creation. We also affirm that Scripture brings the message of freedom, justice and love.We call our Churches to recover their prophetic voice in speaking out against the gross injustice of violence against women and girls.We challenge our Churches to become agents of justice, peace and reconciliation. Reconciliation must be preceded by transformation and accountability. As the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Rev. Justin Welby, recently reflected: ‘There is a challenge to active cooperation with the life of God in our lives now. We live and we serve. The recognition by the Samaritan of the other as his neighbor leads to action, not mere existence. He becomes a herald of reconciliation.’We are deeply grateful to the Anglican Communion Office at the UN for facilitating and supporting the Anglican presence at UN CSW57, and to The Episcopal Church for offering us space and a warm welcome within the Episcopal Church Center. We also extend heartfelt thanks to the many volunteers who so generously gave of their time to extend to us hospitality and care. We enjoyed and benefited considerably from the fellowship of other Anglican and Episcopal women and men present in New York for events surrounding UN CSW57, and sincerely appreciated our interaction with Ecumenical Women, an international coalition of churches and ecumenical organizations which have status with the Economic & Social Council (ECOSOC) at the United Nations.We commit ourselves to promoting the Five Marks of Mission, and in particular to seeking to transform unjust structures of society, challenging violence of every kind and pursuing peace and reconciliation. We pray for God’s grace and guidance as we strive to participate in God’s transforming mission in the world.____________________1 www.anglicancommunion.org/communion/acc/meetings/acc15/resolutions.cfm#s72 www.anglicancommunion.org/communion/acc/meetings/acc15/resolutions.cfm#s10 Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By ACNS staffPosted Mar 25, 2013 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Provide clergy, laity training to prevent violence, say Anglican women Men and boys essential in ending violence against women and girls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

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In Egypt, priest and family narrowly escape attack

first_imgIn Egypt, priest and family narrowly escape attack An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Anglican Communion News Service] An Anglican priest and his family narrowly escaped harm the morning of Aug. 14 after a mob armed with rocks and petrol bombs were kept out of a church building by steel window bars.The Rev. Ehab Ayoub, his family, a lay minister and a guard were trapped in St. Saviour’s Church, Suez, for hours while pro- Mohamed Mursi supporters were attacking the building.Speaking from the Diocese of Egypt’s head office, the Rev. Drew Schmotzer, bishop’s chaplain, told ACNS, “They [the attackers] tried to get through the windows, but our steel bars prevented it, thanks be to God.“Eventually, the army came with tanks and personnel and after a long morning, the family are now out of the church and in a safe place.”The attack on the church came to light after the Most. Rev. Mouneer Anis, bishop of Egypt and president bishop of the Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East, posted an appeal for prayer on the diocesan website.“As I write these words, our St. Saviour’s Anglican Church in Suez is under heavy attack from those who support former President Mursi,” he wrote. “They…have destroyed the car of Rev. Ehab Ayoub, the priest-in-charge of St. Saviour’s Church.“I am also aware that there are attacks on other Orthodox churches in Menyia and Suhag in Upper Egypt, as well as a Catholic church in Suez. Some police stations are also under attack in different parts of Egypt. Please pray and ask others to pray for this inflammable situation in Egypt.”The attack on the churches are part of a deteriorating situation in the country that has prompted the presidency to declare a state of emergency. Several people have died in the clashes including, according to reports, the 17-year-old daughter of leading Muslim Brotherhood figure Mohamed el-Beltagy. Two news reporters, Habiba Ahmed Abd Elaziz and Mick Deane, were also killed.Last week a 10-year-old Christian girl was shot dead on the way home from church. The growing threat to Christians of all denominations in the country is causing concern not only in Egypt but also around the world. Recently, General Bishop Angaelos of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the U.K. released a statement in which he called for urgent action to protect Christians in Egypt.Schmotzer echoed Anis’s call for Christians everywhere to remember the situation in Egypt at this time: “We don’t know what will happen to the [St. Saviour’s] church, and we don’t know what will happen here in Egypt as in many places there is violence. Please continue to pray!” Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By ACNS staffPosted Aug 15, 2013 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Middle East Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Anglican Communion, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Comments (2) September 9, 2013 at 7:09 pm Is there any relief or assistance effort in place by the U.S. Episcopal Church? Is there a statement available from our presiding bishop on the ongoing violence against churches in Egypt, including Anglican churches? Thanks for any resource or contact person. Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Fr. Michael Neal says: August 27, 2013 at 2:20 pm Praying…………………….. Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service The Rev. Phil Reinheimer says: last_img read more

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Four-way dialogue deepens

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Marites N. SisonPosted Jan 8, 2014 Featured Events The Rev. Christopher Brdlik says: Harry W Shipps says: Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Donald Whipple Fox says: January 18, 2014 at 2:10 am Why wouldn’t one be interested in what our elders have to share with us. Jesus is also our elder. People from my tribe, the Santee Sioux, are extremely interested in what our young people and our elders have to say. From the young people, we receive new visions, new perspectives, new ideas and new questions. From our elders we receive the expensive gift of experience, wisdom, calmness in a world that is not ours to control, and understanding that we cannot have as a young person. To answer your question, we should continue to be extremely interested in what “these people,” our relatives have to say to us. Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (6) The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group January 9, 2014 at 4:35 pm The ELCA’s P.B. is Elizabeth Eaton, not “Seaton” per the photo caption. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL (L to R, from back): Archbishop Fred Hiltz, US Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, ELCA Bishop Elizabeth Eaton and ELCIC Bishop Susan Johnson. Photo: Bruce Myers/Anglican Church of Canada[Anglican Journal] The heads of the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC), the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) have agreed to co-ordinate their responses to “events that transcend” their borders, such as natural disasters.They could, for instance, issue a joint pastoral letter in response to a natural calamity and invite their members to contribute to relief and recovery efforts through one of their four relief agencies, said Archdeacon Bruce Myers, the Anglican Church of Canada General Synod’s coordinator for ecumenical and interfaith relations. Myers served as staff support at the meeting.Leaders of the four churches reached this agreement when they met for a day and a half of informal talks last December in Winnipeg. Since 2010, the heads of these four churches have met for informal talks, “becoming colloquially known as the ‘Four-Way,’ ” said Myers.The Anglican Church of Canada’s primate, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, ELCIC Bishop Susan Johnson and Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori were joined in the meeting by the new presiding bishop of the ELCA, Elizabeth Eaton.“Broadly speaking, these informal conversations are aimed at exploring ways to extend the implications of our Anglican-Lutheran full communion partnerships across the international boundary,” said Myers. “What more could we be doing as North American churches in full communion?” The Anglican Church of Canada and the ELCIC have been in full communion since 2011, as have the ELCA and the Episcopal Church.The leaders also agreed to explore ways of addressing the Doctrine of Discovery“as a step towards reconciliation with indigenous people in North America,” said Myers. The Anglican Church of Canada and the Episcopal Church have both repudiated the Doctrine of Discovery.The Anglican church, however, “has only begun to try to give tangible expression to that renunciation,” said Myers. When it renounced the Doctrine of Discovery at the 2010 General Synod, the church pledged a review of its policies and programs to expose the doctrine’s historical impact and end its continuing effects on indigenous peoples. The Doctrine of Discovery was a principle of charters and acts developed by colonizing Western societies more than 500 years ago.[The Episcopal Church renounced the doctrine at its 2009 meeting of General Convention.]At the meeting, Hiltz also informed the other bishops about his church’s recent decision to designate the seventh Sunday of Easter as Jerusalem Sunday. In response, the other three churches “pledged to explore the possibility of making it a common observance,” said Myers.Each leader also agreed to prepare a devotional piece for different Sundays in Advent, to be made available for individual or congregational use in their churches during the 2014 Advent season.They also agreed to look at what they might be able to say collectively in response to an ecumenical convergence text on ecclesiology called The Church: Towards a Common Vision. The document was issued March 2013 by the Faith and Order Commission of the World Council of Churches (WCC). Described by Myers as “groundbreaking,” the text addresses what churches might say together in areas such as peace and justice in the world, and how they might grow in communion and overcome past and present divisions. Theologians “from the widest range of Christian traditions and cultures” produced the text for the WCC. Mary Frances Schjonberg says: January 9, 2014 at 4:53 pm Story is updated to reflect that. Thanks for the heads-up. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY January 10, 2014 at 11:12 pm These churches have an average age of 56; in 20 years, half of their memberships will be dead.Should I really be that interested in anything these people have to say about anything? Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI George Waite says: January 9, 2014 at 9:34 pm What good news. I hope and pray that ecumenism in general will arise from a deep slumber.+Harry Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rev. Roger C. Claxton says: Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Four-way dialogue deepens January 10, 2014 at 1:34 pm If this photo is any indication, Blue must be the new Black! Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

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Video: Archbishop of Canterbury’s presidential address at ACC-16

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Apr 15, 2016 Anglican Communion, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments are closed. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Video ACC16, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Tags Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Video: Archbishop of Canterbury’s presidential address at ACC-16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET April 15, 2016 at 6:04 pm Brilliant! Thank you! This is wonderful and you said it very well. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Episcopal News Service — Lusaka, Zambia] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby delivered his presidential address April 15 to the 16th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross here. The text of the address follows.Thank you very much. And thank you to the choir as well for that amazing wonderful treat. . . It’s quite an interesting feeling being in this Cathedral which was built at almost the exactly the same time as Coventry was, where I was a canon for five years, and is very, very similar. And so when I sit here listening to choral evensong, it reminds me of years and years of sitting listening to the choir at Coventry five days a week and enjoying, again, the same music and delight in choral evensong. It was a real treat, so thank you.I want this evening, rather than looking inwards, to look outwards and forwards; because, in the end, we are here not for ourselves, not for making the Anglicans better, but for seeking to serve the work and mission of God in the world.And the Anglican Communion, as one of the few genuinely worldwide bodies which has a coherent structure in the world today, has to be aware of the great crises of our times. It is easy to forget that we do have a coherent structure. It doesn’t always feel like being coherent, but it exists and it is real.We are in 165 countries. We have dioceses; each diocese has priests and each priest is in a particular area and knows that area. It is not giving away secrets to say [that] three years ago when I met the British foreign secretary, he commented that the Anglican Communion was a better intelligence network than the Secret Intelligence Service.But because we are all over the world and because we are stretched and pulled by our differences, as we have looked at this week, the temptation is either to think only of internal questions, or of traditional issues, and not to realize that around us the world is shifting on its axis. There is a – probably apocryphal – story that in 1974, the Protestant churches of was then called South Vietnam, met to discuss a 10-year strategy, and failed to notice that within three months the North Vietnamese army would conquer them entirelySometimes, the issues we face, even if they are not new, become acute in a new way and compel us to rethink how we work and how we apply the gifts given by God in the mission that he also gives us.It is like if you go to a play, to a theater. Occasionally, when you are watching, there are one or two characters who come on the stage and dominate the entire story of the play. They may not even be in every scene, but every scene in some ways relates to them; and their plans only makes sense, and the scenes only make sense, when we remember they exist.I was recently reading Shakespeare’s Macbeth. And Macbeth and Lady Macbeth dominate the play – even when they are not on the stage.Two actors dominate our world stage at present, I would argue. One is religiously motivated violence, and the other is climate change.The attacks in Brussels before Easter, the Paris attacks last year, the atrocities in Istanbul, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, and many other places; Boko Haram and the horrors of Daesh, persecution in India, in Myanmar, in Sri Lanka, in Pakistan, and many other places and a million other conflicts; have made it clear that when it comes to violence we are in a new era. For the first time in several centuries we have been facing major, global conflicts with a very clear religious content; in which at least one side – if not both – finds that theology is its principle motivation and whose actions are profoundly evil.It doesn’t matter if it is radicalized Buddhists in Myanmar; or Hindus in India; or Muslims in many countries. And, sadly, Christians are part of these actions, whether as participants as in the Central African Republic; or as funders and suppliers of weaponry.And wherever we go, the second actor comes up: the issues of climate change are being more and more clearly felt as we have discussed today. They have a huge impact on economies. They generate conflict, they increase inequality to destabilizing levels. There are moments of hope such as at COP 21 in Paris last December, in which Anglicans led by Archbishop Thabo made a significant difference. Yet at the same time, as we have heard and remember day by day, the outlook of climate change is not potentially bad; it is potentially fatal, for the most fragile countries and regions on earth; and for the billions of people who live in them.Both these characters – religiously motivated violence and climate change – are global. Both these issues are generational, they can’t be solved in two, three, four years; they will take a generation or more. And both – and this is where most of the world forgets this – both characters can only be confronted with a theological and ideological approach and with a story, with a narrative, that is sufficiently powerful to overcome the natural selfishness of one generation, or the selfishness of countries which are more secure.At its heart, these challenges are theological and it requires a deepening of our theological resources. We can only confront them by bringing them face-to-face to the reality of a God we study, worship, engage with, theologically. That is, incidentally, why I support Bishop Graham Kings, who was with us earlier this week, as Mission Theologian in the Anglican Communion. We need to develop our theological strength and visibility in every part of the Communion. Graham’s remit is to support, with others such as the ACO and ACC, the Development of the visibility of the hugely deep and important theological resources in parts of the world that the historic centers of theology, mainly in the Global North, too easily forget.For some of us, the crisis of violence is distant geographically. For all of us the crisis of climate change is both present but often unrecognized, but also distant in time in that its most profound effects, its most terrible effects, the effects that will kill hundreds of millions, if not billions, will not be felt for at least a generation, although the beginnings of the impact are with us very clearly today.Both these crises play a role, are present like the Macbeths, in the other scenes on which we concentrate. Gender based violence is much worse in societies in conflict or under climate stress. Indaba is required to be a tool in reconciliation. Inter-religious relations are at the heart of what we do. Good families are the basic building block of restoring justice and peace, hope and capacity to thrive in the midst of troubled times. The UN and its agencies is crucial to a global response, and that is why we are there. And the UN and its agencies are helpless if that response does not have a clear theological input. Aid requires alliances. And so on.But, for me, the single vision is to ensure that these two powerful characters in our play – in the play of our world today in the theater in which we live – these two characters, religiously motivated violence and climate change, find that in the next generation their parts are reduced in the story of our world and their roles are eliminated before the final curtain comes down. Because if they are not eliminated, they themselves will bring down the curtain.It is our call, I suggest, as Anglicans to be at the heart of those who re-write the play; who bring a new ending.Let me take them one at a time, and then look at some answers.First, the question of religiously motivated violence. I take it first because unless it is tackled the capacity of the world to face climate change is deeply diminished spiritually, economically, emotionally and collectively.The Christian answer is simple, and I quote some words written by one of my colleagues, or the husband of one of my colleagues – a man called Sam Wells in a book called A Nazareth Manifesto. He wrote this:“Reconciliation is the gospel. There is no gospel other than the one that requires and makes possible restored relationships with God, one another, and the creation. God has no ambitions and seeks no final goal beyond restored relationship. That relationship is the telos of creation.”To be Christian we must include, we must be reconciled. Where our present condition leaves us today is with wars, humanitarian crises multiplying, and an unbreakable link in each country between what is happening internationally and domestically, which means that everyone’s domestic policies will constantly be disrupted by overseas events.Last December, the Government officer who is dealing with how in Britain we deal with radicalization, came to see me. She said: “I can’t think of anything outside the UK”. And I said that’s like trying to clean up the ground floor of your house when a river is running through it. Domestic and international are totally linked.And if warfare and armed action are the primary tools we use then what we are doing will become utterly wrong, and will fail. There is that temptation in so many countries. We are in struggles in which we must engage in the right way. We must do the right thing, but we must do it in the right way or we will ourselves sow the seeds of further conflict.Those countries that confront climate change by seeking to make sure they have access to raw materials that others will not then have access to condemn the world to conflict. In a struggle which is deeply ideological and theological, our response must be based in a story of relationship, of mutual protection, of order and human flourishing which overwhelms the demonic narrative of disintegration and demonization of the other which faces us.I pray that we could get hold of a political vision of what reconciliation in this struggle would look like; that must include the idea of a world in which religiously justified violence is eliminated. It was nearly true a few years ago, and is being reversed, for many reasons: economic, sociological, political, cultural, environmental and demographic, with some religion in the middle as a good hook to call all these other causes together.We must overcome this upsurge in religiously justified violence, which by its nature, in all of the great world religions, perverts and abandons its original host by exempting itself from ethical principles, and cares nothing for human life.The second challenge is that of climate change. I have come late to this, recognizing for years that it was very important, but failing to grasp its significance especially among young people. Underlying the issue of climate change is the reality of global injustice and inequality. We are not all equally at risk, and those for whom the risk is less, forgetting solidarity, often will not see the problem.At the same time there is a conscious rejection by some climate change skeptics of the nature of intergenerational equality. It is felt that the problems of 100 years away are too unpredictable to permit us to spend money and effort now.Quite apart from the science, the theology of this is terrible. The church exists in space and time. We are joined by baptism to all past and all future Christians. Unless Christ first returns, the fate of those who belong to the church – let alone the rest of humanity – in 2116 matters deeply to us now.But for human beings to make the decisions necessary, requires the overcoming of our natural selfishness with a greater force, and that force is the call of God to intentional discipleship across time as well as space.Humiliation and disrespect is one of the most corrosive things we can experience. It lasts for centuries in groups and leads to feelings of unfairness. Foreign affairs becomes viewed through the prism of humiliation, as does identity. Minority and identity lead to special vulnerabilities. Humiliation is evident in climate change talks, as well as in war.The response of Jesus is to point to the goal of breaking barriers through love that defies enmity, and in so doing offering a way of justification through accepting the unconditional grace of God. It hardly needs adding that love needs resourcing or it is mere emotion. It is for that reason that the contributions of Provinces, and the remarkable generosity of Compass Rose, make such a difference.So we need to begin by recognizing our selfishness, our human fallenness; and secondly, we must reassert solidarity with one another – with all of one another – but also with generations not yet seen. Solidarity has been vastly expanded in its potential scope by the development of information networks, and it has been deeply undermined the refugee crisis in the short term and through social media in the long term.The refugee crisis and social media bring presence without relationships, both in war and in the impact of climate. We see everything and know no-one. Threatened we retreat.Solidarity is based in the essential human dignity of every individual in creation and salvation. And the demands of solidarity increase inversely to the weakness of the person we see.Our fallenness, our solidarity, and thirdly we must restore wisdom. Wisdom gives us back the subtleties of theology. A curse of our age is theology without subtlety; theology without nuance; theology as a club rather than a torch which illuminates. Subtle theology enables us to engage with the other across religions, across boundaries of continents and climate without hatred.As Anglicans, we need to express these ideas, and we need to express them with a story that we can tell that is more beautiful than the self-interested stories of those who promote conflict or pillage our planet.The church will be core to building this beautiful story, not through force, or authority, but by our authentic living out the difference that Christ makes. This is where intentional discipleship is not merely a Christian virtue but an essential for the survival of the world. To live out our difference in intentional discipleship has to be done in the midst of a dark world where tragedy is a category in which many of us live today. It was in this world that Jesus made decisions, and we know through him that God has not abandoned us. God shows us in Christ that God is on the side of the world, and of every human being, seeking changed hearts that lead to life, not death.In practice, we must start our relationships of love, of human dignity and human flourishing with identity, hospitality and generosity.Can we have Christian communities that give identity to those who are swept hither and thither across the world by the impact of climate change and war. The sixty millions of human beings, whose identity is destroyed and yet the Christian community offers identity. Religious community provide the stability that weak communities need. Religious communities can be the safe channel to express legitimate grievance and the starting point for the building of bridges between opposing sides.We must be confident in pointing towards God whose arms are open but nailed on the cross. We affirm the indivisibility of incarnation and justification, of salvation holding together manger, cross and empty tomb. The glory of God is revealed in that that God became a living person. Through God’s grace we find identity.A theology of identity calls us to love that gives inclusively of ourselves. To love the neighbor that I consider impure is better than to preserve my purity by keeping them at a safe distance. Not least, I will often discover, I was wrong.Identity happens in relationship through hospitality. Hospitality is the second of the key elements of a more beautiful narrative. Both the giver and receiver of hospitality risk identity loss, so all hospitality has to be accompanied by the giving of social dignity.Hospitality is a powerful cure for challenging the right not to be offended. It’s a powerful way of enabling hearts and minds to see a new future in which we accept each other. We find it in Diocesan partnerships, in Indaba, in links and friendships. We give social dignity without taking away social freedom.We need listening relationships for Hospitality, Longfellow said: “If we could read the secret history of our enemies, we should find in each man’s life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.”To listen is essential to both our great challenges and it leads us to the dignity of good disagreement in which we must view diversity as a blessing and not a threat.None of this is easy: peacemakers come to be seen as the enemy. A few years ago, when I was in Lagos, I was talking to a pastor of a Protestant Church, a Pentecostal Church, and he said: “I don’t know where you are going with your Anglican bishops.” I had just become one so that appeared rude, but there you are; and he said: “Did you know you have a Muslim bishop? A Muslim bishop in northern Nigeria?”I said: “I don’t think we do”; he said: “Oh yes you do” – it was beginning to sound like a Pantomime – “Oh no we don’t!”I said: “What’s his name?” He said: “His name is Josiah Idowu-Fearon.”Did you know we have a Muslim secretary general? I don’t think so.Why was he accused of such a thing? Because he insisted that reconciliation was part of his life and ministry as an archbishop in northern Nigeria.Heroes of peace become the victims of their own people. They shake hands with the enemy – whether a violent enemy, or the company that pollutes, or the nation that rejects climate science. And to do so is seen as the ultimate disloyalty. Fear is the greatest enemy of any dialogue, hospitality attracts suspicion.May Anglicans become deeply suspicious to everyone else because they are full of hospitality.And the final aspect of this new narrative – it is not the final aspect; A third aspect is human flourishing. We need a new theological dialogue, based in wisdom, expressed in solidarity, giving in love and hospitality, which focuses on human flourishing. We over-simplify the challenges of religiously motivated violence and of climate change. We must challenge their oversimplification. We must welcome the richness and the wealth of what God has created.Such a theological dialogue – a new one of human flourishing – offers a better option. It is willing to name violence and corruption in its own tradition. To deny it only aids extremism. A text may be sacred, interpretation is not.Dialogue names the perpetrators of violence when they are part of their faith tradition. Dialogue says the people who killed 7,000 Muslims in Srebrenica 20 years ago, were Christians. Dialogue accepts that Christians were, for generations, using the earth’s resources as though they had no limit. Dialogue accepts that Daesh are Muslims.Dialogue names the issues in climate change, it permits us to hear when we have failed. A dialogue of human flourishing means that hard words are said in the context of soft relationships, and their hardness dissolves into understanding.And when we look at our religious leaders of other traditions, we need to love and support them so that they can find the theological and ideological aspects of these two struggles. We must own our problems and confront them.Intentional discipleship is based on the empowering filling of the Spirit of Christ. It does not attempt everything, but it faces reality well. It risks so that Christ may be glorified, it loves so that Christ may be seen, it blesses so that the purposes of Christ are accomplished. It does not abandon, but embraces, it does not hate and scoff, but it weeps and mourns. It is our all as Christians, and nothing can be more important.Amen. Annette Dean says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (1) Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Archbishop of Canterbury, Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Anglican Consultative Council, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

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