Starting up in hard times

first_imgFew American companies bring to mind innovation more quickly than Apple, the inventor and purveyor of iPads, iPhones, and other devices we never knew we needed until, suddenly, we did. But it took a down market to take the company from its humble origins in desktops and laptops to its current heights in making and marketing imaginative products.When the dot-com bubble burst a decade ago, Apple lost a third of its revenue virtually overnight. Founder Steve Jobs’ recovery plan was highly risky: Rather than sticking to what it did best, the company should venture into new markets.“Their decision was that they would innovate their way through hard economic times, with the fundamental conviction that there would be a market on the other side of it for the products they would develop,” said Baba Shetty, chief strategy officer and chief media officer at the advertising firm Hill Holliday. The bet paid off: Apple was recently valued at more than $300 billion, outpacing Microsoft for the first time.Now, as the United States fights its way out of a much broader and deeper recession, Apple’s example should be instructive to both new entrepreneurs and large, established companies alike, Shetty said Thursday (March 24) at Harvard Business School (HBS).Shetty was joined by a host of other entrepreneurial business leaders and by William A. Sahlman, Dimitri V. D’Arbeloff-M.B.A. Class of 1955 Professor of Business Administration and senior associate dean for external relations at HBS. The session, “Entrepreneurship During an Uncertain Time,” was hosted by HBS and The Economist magazine, and was held for HBS alumni and HBS Executive Education participants. The event explored ways that innovation — and an entrepreneurial mindset — are critical to getting the economy back on track.“The entrepreneurial process is very important in driving America out of this recession,” said Robin Bew, editorial director and chief economist for The Economist Intelligence Unit and the event’s moderator. The question, Bew said, is whether the current business environment in the United States is doing a good job of fostering a climate where entrepreneurs can take crucial risks and where new businesses can succeed.The political climate, the panelists agreed, has only made it harder for new businesses to achieve stability. Until Congress is able to settle on a long-term plan for tackling problems like the growing national debt, they said, business leaders will have to navigate a series of short-term, politically motivated legislative efforts that are likely to seesaw dramatically from year to year based on which party is in power.“We have tremendous uncertainty in the United States about what set of policies are going to be in place,” Sahlman said, because “we’re politically incapable of making hard decisions.”Not knowing what the tax rates for the next year will be makes it hard for entrepreneurs to plan for the coming year, and such adjustments can make or break young businesses. “We’re stuck in a period where the lack of clarity about direction is going to be problematic,” he added.Don Young, president and CEO of Aspen Aerogels, lamented the “lack of a predictable regulatory scheme” for businesses like his. Aspen Aerogels, which makes and sells energy-efficient insulation materials for industrial and construction uses, has turned to the federal government for support, applying for a loan guarantee from the U.S. Department of Energy. After spending nearly $1 million on the application process, Young said, “It looks like the program might run out on Sept. 30.”“That’s a really difficult situation for us,” Young said. “It weakens the foundation of a company like ours.”Sheila Lirio Marcelo, founder and chief executive officer of Care.com, a fast-growing website that helps to pair families with caregivers, pointed out that immigration laws — another political hot potato — can set young businesses back. Her company has run into trouble trying to get the best Java developers from India to staff her rapidly growing operation in Massachusetts.“For me to grow, I need the talent for the team to be able to innovate,” she said.But even in economically and politically uncertain times, large and small companies alike can learn the lessons of smart innovation, the panelists said.“I think a lot of big companies spend a lot of resources playing defense … where a lot of small companies can play offense,” said Mark Norman, president and chief operating officer of Zipcar, the auto-sharing company that has expanded in the past decade from its Cambridge origins to markets as far away as Vancouver and London.Large companies are often more interested in protecting their already-successful products than in creating new ones, Norman said. Companies can benefit from “structured experimentation,” or by thinking small even within a big organization.“Anything new that you roll out, there’s this pressure that it’s got to pan out quickly, and that’s another kind of pressure to kill innovation,” Marcelo said. “But you’ve got to make a bet on these small things, and on trusting your gut, which is part of being an entrepreneur.”After heated discussion, the evening ended on an optimistic note. Despite how inhospitable today’s economy may look to start-ups, America’s problems are only temporary, Sahlman said.“The elasticity of innovation and entrepreneurship is the highest in this country of anywhere in the world,” Sahlman said. “All we have to do is figure out a way to unleash it, and we will get progress on all those problems.”last_img read more

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Liberia Hosts 18th Regional Universities Forum

first_imgThe Executive Board of the Regional Universities Forum for Capacity-building in Agriculture (RUFORUM), will host its meetings in Monrovia bringing together 25 ranked African university presidents, Liberian business people and farmers, University of Liberia (UL) President, Dr. Ophelia Inez Weeks, has said.RUFORUM Executive Board meetings will bring together about 17 Presidents/Vice-Chancellors, Principals and Deans, from highly ranked African universities that are offering academic programs in agriculture, engineering, science and technology.The delegates will come from Benin, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Senegal, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda and Zambia.“This year’s meetings in Liberia will allow presidents of various universities in Liberia to discuss on mutual benefits, as many of the universities are much more resourceful in facilities and progress. This will give our people the opportunities to network with other universities in various areas of focus during the meetings,” Dr. Weeks said.She made the disclosure on Wednesday, April 17, 2019 at a news conference in Monrovia.Dr. Weeks said that the meetings will host highly ranked African universities that are offering programs in agriculture, science, engineering and technology.The meeting, which is hosted by the UL Administration in collaboration with authorities at the ministries of Education and Agriculture, is the 18th Executive Board gathering. The RUFORUM forum will be combined with national symposium on higher education.Dr. Weeks said Liberia was fortunate in 2018 when it received eight slots for UL’s faculty members to do their PhD in agriculture in East Africa, adding, “there are more opportunities for being a member of the organization.”She said the organization has decided to transition from just agriculture to science, technology, engineering and mathematics.According to Dr. Weeks, the program will give Liberia and the UL Administration more PhDs who will, in return, help to offer master degrees in agriculture, engineering, while saving the money used to send people out for foreign studies.She said that government cannot do all, therefore, it was necessary to partner with the private sector and individuals with potential to bring change to the country’s education system.Dr. Weeks currently serves the deputy board chair for the meeting. She said Liberia is delighted to host this year’s meeting, which allows business people and presidents of Liberia’s universities to seek outside opportunities.“We have also invited private businesses to bring samples of their products to serve as networking opportunities. This will also expose our universities presidents to the works of their colleagues from universities in different countries,” she said.Dr. Moses Zinnah, Dean of the UL Agriculture College, said this year’s engagement provides special opportunities for presidents of Liberia’s universities to host a one-day forum, which will take place on April 26 to discuss the way forward in improving higher education.“If we miss this component, it will be difficult for Liberia to complete regionally and globally, because this will provide opportunities for universities presidents, farmers and business people to network and begin thinking critically to improve higher education,” Dr. Zinnah said.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Country brings in offshoring business

first_imgNumerous big-name overseas companies, including Amazon and Asda, run their customer relations and call centre operations out of South Africa.(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free images, visit the image library) Amazon’s Cape Town-based call centre started operations in South Africa in 2010.(Image: Engineering News)MEDIA CONTACTS • Patrick GordonHead of marketing and PR, BPeSAWestern Cape+27 21 427 2900Janine ErasmusSouth Africa’s reputation as one of the world’s most sought-after offshoring destinations has received endorsement from the European Outsourcing Association (EOA), which named the country as its destination of the year for 2013.Last year’s winner was another African country, Morocco. It was honoured along with MEDZ Sourcing, which manages business parks in Morocco that are dedicated to offshoring. The EOA is viewed as Europe’s most important association of professionals and experts in the outsourcing industry, according to Abderrafie Hanouf of MEDZ Sourcing. It has over a thousand corporate members representing national trade associations from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, The Netherlands, the United Kingdom.South Africa was a finalist last year, and this year saw off competition from Russia and Serbia to clinch the top spot.The ceremony took place on 25 April in Amsterdam. South Africa was entered by the national association, Business Processing enabling South Africa (BPeSA), and the award comes hot on the heels of its October 2012 triumph at the London-based National Outsourcing Association’s annual ceremony, where it was voted the UK offshoring destination of the year.BPeSA Western Cape chief executive Gareth Pritchard was delighted with the honour, saying it confirmed the quality of service that South Africa offered to its European clients. “Services in other languages, combined with a growing base of high-end skills in financial and legal services, have highlighted the country’s status as a world-class offshoring location,” he said.Offshoring contributes an estimated R8-billion (US$895-million) to the province’s economy and employs thousands of people, according to the Western Cape’s minister of finance, economic development and tourism, Alan Winde.Statistics from the City of Cape Town reveal that the city’s outsourcing industry grew from 20 428 agents in 2007/8, to 27 552 in 2011/12 – a year on year increase of 10.5%During the same period the offshoring sector increased from 2 963 to 4 727 agents. This represents a remarkable year on year growth of 16.9%. During 2012 the industry attracted investment of R510-million ($57-million).Fast-growing sectorA 2011 survey (PDF, 105KB) by international research group Everest Consultancy named South Africa as one of the top three emerging offshore business process outsourcing (BPO) destinations in the world.Offshoring goes one step further than BPO, which is the practice of relocating business processes that a company usually performs in-house, such as accounting or customer call centres, to a third-party service provider, to carry out on behalf of the company.Outsourcing becomes offshoring when the third-party service provider is located in another country.South Africa was expected to make steady progress in the offshoring sector in years to come, said senior analyst Partha Iyengar of technology research firm Gartner. He was speaking at a symposium hosted in Cape Town by the company in August 2012. Iyengar predicted the creation of 40 000 new jobs through offshoring by 2014, while the local insourced sector would provide jobs for 120 000 people.Iyengar stated that by 2015, he expected offshore contact centre jobs in South Africa to grow to more than three times the number in 2010.Attractions and incentivesMuch of the outsourcing industry is based in the Western Cape. Here companies can take advantage of attractions such as a multi-lingual workforce that doesn’t have a strong accent and that speaks English, German, Dutch, Italian and French; costs of between 50% and 60% lower than source countries; top-class infrastructure; enhanced quality of life for expats; time zone compatibility with the UK and Europe; government support in the form of tax and bonus incentives and training programmes via the Department of Trade and Industry; and more.At the end of April 2013, Winde announced further government support for the sector of R300-million ($33.6-million) for the current financial year, which would result in the creation of 2 500 jobs.“We are focusing on this sector, which has an average entry level salary of R6 500 ($727), because it is labour intensive and has a relatively low barrier to entry. Indeed, 70% of all employees are between the ages of 18 and 35 and carry only a matric. Creating opportunities for our youth to become employed is my top priority,” said Winde.BPeSA’s Pritchard said at the same event that in 2012, more than 4 500 jobs had been created in the BPO and contact centre industry.Companies making use of South African facilities include, among others, British Gas; Amazon; Switzerland’s Edelweiss Air; global outsourcing leader WNS; Bloomberg; Virgin Mobile; Everything Everywhere, which handles communications for the Orange and T-Mobile brands; and British retailer Asda, which has been running its contact centre from Cape Town since 2005.last_img read more

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Pediatric heart surgery- discharge

first_imgAlternate NamesCongenital heart surgery – discharge; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation – discharge; Hypoplastic left heart repair – discharge; Tetralogy of Fallot repair – discharge; Coarctation of the aorta repair – discharge; Heart surgery for children – discharge; Atrial septal defect repair – discharge; Ventricular septal defect repair – discharge; Truncus arteriosus repair – discharge; Total anomalous pulmonary artery correction – discharge; Transposition of great vessels repair – discharge; Tricuspid atresia repair – discharge; VSD repair – discharge; ASD repair – discharge; PDA ligation – discharge; Acquired heart disease – discharge; Heart valve surgery – children – discharge; Heart surgery – pediatric – discharge; Heart transplant – pediatric – dischargeWhen Your Child Was in the HospitalYour child had surgery to repair a heart defect. If your child had open-heart surgery, an incision was made through their breastbone or the side of your childs chest. The child also may have been put on a heart-lung bypass machine during surgery.After the surgery, your child probably stayed in the intensive care unit and then in another part of the hospital.What to Expect at HomeYour child will need at least 3 or 4 more weeks at home to recover. For larger surgeries, recovery may take 6 to 8 weeks. Talk with your childs doctor about when your child can return to school, daycare, or participate in sports.Pain after surgery is normal. There may be more pain after closed-heart surgery, compared to open-heart surgery. This is because nerves may have been irritated or cut. Usually, the pain decreases after the second day and con sometimes be managed with acetaminophen (Tylenol).advertisementMany children behave differently after heart surgery. They may be clingy, irritable, wet the bed, or cry. They may do these things even if they were not doing them before their surgery. Support your child through this time, and slowly begin to set the limits that were in place before the surgery.Activity If your child is an infant, try not to let them cry for too long for the first 3- 4 weeks. Help keep them calm by staying calm yourself. When lifting your child, support both their head and bottom for the first 4- 6 weeks.Toddlers and older children will often stop any activity if they become tired.The doctor or nurse will tell you when it is okay for your child to return to school or daycare.Most often, the first few weeks after surgery should be a time to rest.After the first follow-up visit, the doctor will tell you what the child can do.For the first 4 weeks after surgery, your child should not do any activity where there is a chance they could fall or take a blow to the chest. Your child also should avoid bicycle or skateboard riding, roller skating, swimming, and all contact sports until the childs doctor says its okay.If your child has an incision through the breastbone, you must be careful how they use their arms and upper body for the first 6- 8 weeks:Do not pull or lift the child by their arms. Scoop them up instead.Your child should not do any activities that involve pulling or pushing their arms.Try to keep your child from lifting their arms above their head.Your child should not lift anything heavier than 5 pounds.Diet Keep a close eye on your child?s diet to make sure they get enough calories to heal and grow.After heart surgery, most babies and infants (younger than 12 to 15 months) can take as much formula or breast milk as they want. Sometimes the doctor may want your baby not to drink too much formula or breast milk. Ask your child?s doctor any other questions about your childs nutrition.Limit feeding time to around 30 minutes. Your child?s doctor or nurse will tell you how to add extra calories to formula if it is necessary.Toddlers and older children should be given a regular, healthy diet. The doctor or nurse will tell you how to improve the childs diet after surgery.Wound Care Your health care providers will instruct you on how to care for the incisions. Look at the wound for signs of infection, which are redness, swelling, and drainage.Your child should take only a shower or a sponge bath until your health care provider says its okay. Their Steri-Strips should NOT soak in the water. Steri-Strips will begin to peel off after the first week. It is okay to remove them when they start to peel off.advertisementFor as long as the scar looks pink, make sure it is covered with clothing or a bandage when your child is in the sun.Follow-upAsk your child?s doctor before getting any immunizations for 2 – 3 months after surgery. Afterward, your child should have a flu shot every year.Many children who have had heart surgery must take antibiotics before, and sometimes after, having any dental work. Make sure you have clear instructions from your child?s heart doctor when the child needs antibiotics. It is still very important to have your childs teeth cleaned regularly.Your child may need to take medicine when they are sent home. These may include diuretics (water pills) and other heart medicines. Be sure to follow the correct dosage. Follow up with your doctor 1 – 2 weeks after the child leaves the hospital or the as instructed.When to Call the DoctorCall the doctor if your child has:Fever, nausea, or vomitingChest pain, or other painRedness, swelling, or drainage from the woundDifficulty breathing or shortness of breathPuffy eyes or faceTiredness all the timeBluish or grayish skinDizziness, fainting, or heart palpitationsFeeding problems or reduced appetiteReferencesPigula FA, Del Nido, PJ. Neonatal and infant cardiac surgery. In: Keane JF, Lock JE, Fyler DC, eds. Nadas? Pediatric Cardiology, 2nd ed. St. Louis, Mo; WB Saunders; 2006:chap 57.Recommendations for preparing children and adolescents for invasive cardiac procedures: A statement from the American Heart Association Pediatric Nursing Subcommittee of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing in collaboration with the Council on Cardiovascular Diseases of the Young. Circulation. 2003;108:2250-2564.Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, Fraser CD Jr, Carberry KE, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 19th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2012:chap 59.Review Date:6/5/2012Reviewed By:Kurt R. Schumacher, MD, Pediatric Cardiology, University of Michigan Congenital Heart Center, Ann Arbor, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.last_img read more

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NPSC Steps Up Efforts to Equip Parents with Coping Skills

first_img The National Parenting Support Commission (NPSC) is stepping up efforts to equip parents to properly raise their children.Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Kaysia Kerr, tells JIS News that the entity is concerned about the number of parents who are showing low coping skills and are consciously ‘opting out’, not wanting to continue the duties associated with parenting.Over the past month, the NPSC, under its ‘Be the Influence’ campaign, has been placing emphasis on three areas – planned parenthood, substance abuse and corporal punishment.Planned parenthood, as the term suggests, encourages prospective parents to plan before having children and to develop strategies for how to approach parenting.“When you think about parenting, in the same way you think about the career you want, the house you think you want to live in or the other material things you want, and sit down and craft a plan to obtain them, it is the same thing we are saying to our prospective parents,” Ms. Kerr says.She adds that “for those that have teenagers and early teens, we encourage them to sit down, and have the conversation with them about parenting and why it is important to plan”.As it relates to substance abuse, Ms. Kerr says the NPSC is providing assistance where children are purchasing over-the-counter drugs and cough syrup, which she says, are being mixed to make “dangerous cocktails”.“We want parents to explain to children why it is dangerous to ingest these substances. Don’t just say ‘don’t use this particular substance’… .  You need to encourage children on a daily basis… . Remind them when they are going off to school, if they see negative things happening, they do not have to partake,” she says.Ms. Kerr advises parents to develop a relationship with their children, so that they will be comfortable speaking to them about these matters. Parents will then be able to make a report to the school that these substances are being circulated on the compound, she points out.Importantly, Ms. Kerr notes that parents must investigate the reasons their child may be taking these substances, as this may be a sign of underlying emotional issues.“You can explore, because if your child is following a fad, that is perhaps easier to correct than if there are underlying issues and the child is using the substance to self-medicate or cover up the pain that he/she is feeling. Encourage and support them, and you get to delve into whether or not your children are involved in these activities, and what they need to do to stay away from these substances,” she explains.On the topic of corporal punishment, Ms. Kerr says the NPSC is seeking to start a national discourse to eliminate this method of discipline, as it has the potential to escalate to abuse.Rather than flogging, she is encouraging parents to have conversations with children to uncover the underlying reasons for behavioural problems.“Strike a conversation, not your child… .  We really don’t want children to be beaten. We want that cycle to be broken. There are other positive practices that can be employed that will elicit a better response than the potential abuse. Find out why children are behaving the way they are,” she advises.Also, Ms. Kerr recommends that parents encourage discussions about the child’s feelings.“You want to explain to them and you want to get from them what their own feelings are about these boundaries. Where possible, compromise. Parents must be prepared to compromise, but we don’t want beatings to continue,” she says.Other recommendations Ms. Kerr offers is for parents to explain the reasons for the rules they have set and why it is important that the child adhere to these rules for their well-being.The NPSC’s ‘Be the Influence’ campaign is the continuation of a three-year campaign that was launched in 2017 as a call to action for parents to strive to be positive role models in their children’s lives. She adds that “for those that have teenagers and early teens, we encourage them to sit down, and have the conversation with them about parenting and why it is important to plan”. The National Parenting Support Commission (NPSC) is stepping up efforts to equip parents to properly raise their children. Story Highlights The NPSC’s ‘Be the Influence’ campaign is the continuation of a three-year campaign that was launched in 2017 as a call to action for parents to strive to be positive role models in their children’s lives.last_img read more

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Joan Jett Unveils New PETA Ad

first_imgGazing into the camera next to the words “I Am Joan Jett, and I Am a Vegetarian”, platinum-selling America musician, Joan Jett, unveiled her new ad on Sunday at a star-studded event in Florida.Joan Jett’s New PETA AdShe was joined by punk-rock icon Iggy Pop, who presented the Blackhearts’ leader with the Nanci Alexander Activist Award, named for the founder of the Animal Rights Foundation of Florida and owner of the gourmet vegan restaurant, Sublime, where the event took place.“Joan takes every opportunity to talk about the importance of being kind to animals, and she’s among the most dedicated activists I’ve had the pleasure of knowing”, says PETA founder Ingrid E Newkirk. “People listen when this star talks. She’s had a positive influence on countless fans.”Just like us, other animals are highly social, form strong bonds with their friends and families and mourn when they lose a loved one. They can experience joy, love, pain and fear. Yet on factory farms, pigs, chickens and other animals are crowded together in their own waste, and many are driven insane. Most never see sunlight or breathe fresh air. When they are still very young, they are loaded onto lorries bound for the abattoir, where they ride a conveyor belt to the person or machine with the knife. Many are still conscious and terrified when they face the final incision.To view PETA UK ads featuring Jett and Iggy Pop and to take the 30-day pledge to be vegan for World Vegan Month, visit PETA.org.uk.last_img read more

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FNs MMA fighters take it to the mat

first_imgAPTN National NewsMixed Martial Arts, known as MMA, is one of the fastest growing sports in the world.Ontario announced this past summer it was finally lifting its ban on MMA events.First Nations fighters in the Niagra Falls area are no able to speak openly about the combat sport.APTN National News reporter Wayne Roberts has this story.last_img

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Illegal Immigrant detained by Border Patrol on suspicion of organizing transnational criminal

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter John Soderman, Illegal Immigrant detained by Border Patrol on suspicion of organizing transnational criminal smuggling operation 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsNATIONAL CITY (KUSI) — An illegal immigrant living in National City was arrested over the weekend on suspicion of being an organizer for a transnational criminal smuggling organization operating in East County.Cellphone video, that has since gone viral, shows Perla Morales-Luna being detained by Border Patrol agents in front of her three daughters Saturday, March 4.Morales-Luna was arrested as a result of a targeted operation on March 3 in National City for being in the country illegally, according to Michael J. Scappechio, Supervisory Border Patrol Agent for the U.S. Border Patrol.Morales-Luna is currently in Border Patrol custody awaiting transfer to ICE for removal proceedings.Video Playerhttp://www.kusi.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Woman-deported-video-1.mp4Media error: Format(s) not supported or source(s) not foundmejs.download-file: http://www.kusi.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Woman-deported-video-1.mp4?_=100:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.This is a developing story and will be updated as information becomes available. John Soderman center_img Updated: 4:15 PM Posted: March 8, 2018 March 8, 2018last_img read more

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