Italian Cup: Juventus, AC Milan cruise to last eight

first_imgShorn of stars Juventus, AC Milan still cruise in Italian Cup https://t.co/vv5mHOcw1B #FOOTBALL pic.twitter.com/srzDb5psld— Mr Derek Trottter (@MrDerekTrottter) January 15, 2020 Read Also: Ronaldo rivalry will be remembered forever, claims Messi Troubled Napoli eased into the quarters with a 2-0 win over Perugia thanks to two Lorenzo Insigne penalties. In the last eight, AC Milan will face Torino who beat Genoa on penalties last week. Juventus will play the winner of the last tie of the round, Roma at Parma on Thursday. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 In Tuscany, Spaniard Pol Lirola collected Erik Pulgar’s long pass before charging towards goal and slotting home his first Fiorentina goal six minutes from time, winning the tie for the hosts despite German Pezzella’s sending off 14 minutes earlier. Patrick Cutrone also scored his first goal for the club when he put Fiorentina ahead in the 11th minute of his first start since arriving on loan from Wolverhampton Wanderers last week. The away side scored a deserved leveller when former Fiorentina man Ilicic turned in a superb Ruslan Malinovskiy cross. But Lirola won the tie to set up a tough match with Serie A title chasers Inter Milan. The winner of that clash face either Lazio or Napoli in the semifinals. On Tuesday, Inter thumped Cagliari 4-1 with Romelu Lukaku scoring twice. Holders Lazio, who are on a club-record run of 10 straight wins in Serie A, made short work of Cremonese in their 4-0 victory in Rome. Cristiano Ronaldo was too ill to play, while Zlatan Ibrahimovic spent the evening resting on the bench, but even without their biggest stars, Juventus and AC Milan cruised into the last eight of the Italian Cup on Wednesday. Juventus beat visiting Udinese 4-0 in the late game, after Milan had dispatched SPAL, 3-0. Paulo Dybala lofted the ball into the far corner for the third Juventus goal In the first game of the evening, 10-man Fiorentina beat Atalanta 2-1. Ronaldo was sidelined after suffering an attack of sinusitis in the afternoon, but he is not the only ace in the Juventus pack. After 16 minutes, Paulo Dybala carved through Udinese with a series of quick one-twos, finishing with a couple of exchanges with centre forward Gonzalo Higuain. When his Argentine compatriot played a pass one little behind him, Dybala spun and floated the ball onto Higuain’s chest and he strode forward and scored. Ten minutes later, after Udinese goalkeeper Nicolas tripped Federico Bernardeschi. Dybala converted the penalty. Dybala scored a in the 58th minute, clipping the ball over Nicolas from the right edge of the box. Two minutes later Douglas Costa converted Juve’s second penalty after Bram Nuytinck handled. In Milan, Krzysztof Piatek, who is reportedly on the verge of a move to Tottenham Hotspur, outpaced the sluggish SPAL offside trap to give the home team the lead after 20 minutes. Samuel Castillejo curled a precise left-foot shot inside the far post just before half time. Krzysztof Piatek beat goalkeeper Etrit Berisha to give AC Milan the lead Fullback Theo Hernandez added a third in the 66th minute, surging upfield and smashing home a left-foot shot from just outside the penalty area.center_img Promoted Content7 Inventions Created To Start Saving The World6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A DroneCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowA Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of Art8 Weird Facts About Coffee That Will Surprise YouTop 10 Most Populated Cities In The WorldWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?10 Most Praised Historical Movies8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World Loading… last_img read more

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Poe’s Perspective: Wade may be a better father than a player

first_imgWade’s 11-year-old son Zion walked in the Miami Beach pride parade over the weekend, decked out in bright yellow and a rainbow unicorn horn. He was accompanied by Wade’s wife Gabrielle Union and his older brother Zaire, who was seen dancing throughout the parade in a rainbow headband. Yeah, he dropped 30 points in his final home game in Miami, but I don’t care about that. What I care about is the statement that Wade made this week, even amid the hype of his retirement, about the importance of showing love and support to his son. In the middle of a sea of Dwyane Wade praise this week, I’m going to try to skirt around the obvious topic of his retirement and focus on perhaps the greatest thing he’s done in the last seven days. There are plenty of ways that parents of LGBTQ+ children mute their kids’ identities. There are parents who refuse to let their children buy the clothes, wear the makeup, listen to the music, join the school clubs and watch the TV shows they love. There are parents who ignore it, hoping that silence might help make the truth go away. There are parents who say their child is too young and naive to have any idea what their sexuality might be or what their future might hold. But what I wish I could tell him instead is that his retirement will usher in the most important part of his life — the part where he gets to be a parent, first, every day. For those who aren’t LGBTQ+, it might be difficult to understand the full depth of the impact these actions have on Zion’s identity. Sure, everyone understands that it is amazing and important that Wade has acknowledged and accepted his son’s identity. It’s a vital example of a young child coming out to his father and not facing discrimination, intolerance or hate. There have been plenty of rumors surrounding Zion’s identity for some time now. Last month, he walked the runway in Wade’s charity fashion show, which was met with a flurry of criticism and speculation on social media when Wade shared a clip of it on his Instagram. But there is only one part of that video that really mattered — Union on her feet, shouting and hollering the entire time that Zion strutted, struck a pose and sashayed away, and Wade right next to her, cheering and proudly sharing a clip of his son “killin’ it” on the runway. I’m not an NBA fan, so I’m not the right person to write about Wade as a basketball player. I know that he’s a legend and that his presence will be sorely missed in the NBA. I know that what he’s done for the game is going to live on long past the end of his career. I’m sure it won’t be perfect. It’s hard to be a celebrity parent and even harder to be the celebrity parent of an LGBTQ+ son who has to come out under public scrutiny. None of that will be easy for Wade. But so far, I have to say, he’s getting everything right.center_img Due to a pair of road games, Wade wasn’t able to attend the parade, but that didn’t stop him from showing support for his son. Throughout the day, Wade posted pictures of his entire family accompanied with loving captions like, “We support each other with Pride” and “It’s a family thing.” Wade is effectively doing what every parent hopes to do — he’s getting rid of the fear in his son’s life. He’s taking care of the monster hiding under the bed or, pardon the pun, in the closet. He certainly can’t remove homophobia or bigotry from Zion’s life, and at some point — if he hasn’t already — he will be forced to face a moment when he can’t shield his son from the hate of the world. When most people consider the “bad” parent of an LGBTQ+ child, they think of violence. Parents who beat their children, who kill their children, who throw them out on the street or ship them away to camps. These are the parents who come to mind, of course, but this proclivity toward labeling “bad” parents as the violent and hateful ones often excludes the much wider swath of parents who damage their children simply by not accepting them. But Wade is doing the most any parent can. He’s giving his son a safe place to rely on, a set of arms to always fall into and the guarantee that no matter how mean and horrible the world becomes, he will always have love to come home to at the end of the day. And then, at the other end of the spectrum, there’s Dwyane Wade, putting his kid in a rainbow unicorn horn and telling the whole world that he’s proud of his son’s identity. Not despite his gayness, but because of it, because that part of his son’s identity makes him the whole human being that he is today. Words can’t describe what these choices will do for Zion. Most LGBTQ+ kids grow up feeling scared either on some level or all the time. Scared that someone will find out. Julia Poe is a senior writing about her personal connection to sports. Her column, “Poe’s Perspective,” runs weekly on Thursdays.last_img read more

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Trustly’s Nicholas Tucker: Fast payments, fast answers and fast Pay N Play pick up

first_img Internet Vikings appoints ‘marketing pro’ Stefan Backlund as corporate advisor March 20, 2020 Related Articles StumbleUpon Share SBC Magazine Issue 8: International expansion and picking up the sporting slack April 7, 2020 Share Submit SBC Digital Summit: ‘Cashless’ environments to take centre stage when retail returns – Samuel Barrett April 30, 2020 Fresh from completing a research study into ‘The Power of Fast Payments’ that yielded such an eye-catching set of takeaways for the industry, we went back to Trustly to delve deeper into the data that really matters for gambling operators.We’ve taken an educated guess that those interested in fast payments may also be here looking for fast answers. So, for the quick and easy responses from Head of Sales Nicholas Tucker, here goes: Has the value of payments been overlooked by the industry? No. Has the ‘race to the bottom’ approach to bonusing opened the door for payment innovation? Definitely. Are operators unjustifiably concerned about losing revenues from instant withdrawals? Yes.Now, these sharp responses could have been elicited by our line of questioning, or maybe we were just hitting the right notes for Trustly heading into next week’s Betting on Sports.In any case, Tucker proceeded to deliver some must-read insight into the influence of Pay N Play and where the company’s flagship product is seeing the biggest uptake, as well as some of the more surprising findings from last month’s fast payments research.SBC: Do you think the value of payments has been overlooked by the gambling industry?Nicholas Tucker: No! Personally, I think that successful gaming operators have always viewed payments as a core pillar of the success of their operations. The last thing you want is to lose the player at the first hurdle when they try to make a deposit or create a bad wagering experience by making it hard to access winnings. As a whole, we see much more expertise and innovation in payments within the gaming vertical compared to some others we work in. Essentially, for an operator to be successful, it needs to make payments as easy and frictionless as possible for the consumer. When you look at the cashier of a gaming operator vs an e-commerce or travel merchant, you will see far more payment options. I think this reflects the level of value and dedication placed on making payments possible for the player.SBC: Has the slowing of the ‘race to the bottom’ approach to player retention opened the door for payment-based innovations to take centre stage?NT: Definitely. We were seeing fierce competition between operators all trying to attract and retain players by offering huge bonuses (with hidden and confusing wagering requirements) but without much regard for what players wanted in terms of experience. Also, regulators are beginning to step in by simplifying or restricting the size and frequency of player bonuses, hampering this model of acquisition and retention. Through our Pay N Play product, we have helped operators switch the focus to player experience by offering a simplified registration and deposit process and improving the speed that winnings reach the player’s bank account. I think increasingly we will see payment, game and affiliate suppliers working closely with the operator to enhance the player experience rather than simply offering them a bonus to play more. The operators with the best player experience and strongest brand recognition (based on values players respect) will come out on top. This is what we have started to see in the Swedish market since regulation.SBC: Part of the research summary was that operators are worried about losing revenues when in fact instant withdrawals represent a revenue growth opportunity; was dispelling these concerns one of your biggest commercial challenges?NT: Yes! I have had conversations with some of the largest sports betting brands that indicate a very significant proportion of their revenue comes from cancelled withdrawals. It requires a big change in mindset to adopt a new approach, especially when some stakeholders within the business are worried about the impact on the balance sheet. However, once one operator in a market offers instant withdrawals (and it embraces the revenue growth opportunity), others soon follow as players begin to expect the functionality as a hygiene factor when considering which brands they play with.SBC: What were the surprise findings from the research?NT: Contrary to the belief of some of the more traditional operators, we have found that players increasingly prioritise the speed and access to winnings as a key driver of loyalty towards a brand. This is especially prevalent among VIP players. Out of the 1,700 players across nine countries that we interviewed during the research, we found that 94% want instant access to their winnings. Given the high cost of acquiring new players, it is more important than ever to keep active players happy by catering to their needs over the long term, such as instant withdrawals. Interestingly, 80% of players said they would gamble more if they were offered instant withdrawals by the operator. Another interesting find was that more people remember their bank login details versus their card details. Now that the ease of logging in and authenticating a bank payment is improving dramatically, supported by PSD2 and Open Banking, there is a genuine opportunity for direct bank payments to become the method of choice in markets where card schemes have previously dominated. This provides a platform for innovation around player registration, ID verification, source of funds and responsible gaming checks in markets like the UK.SBC: Finally, your Pay N Play product has quickly become an ‘industry standard’ in Sweden; in which other countries are you seeing the biggest pick-up?NT: We have seen fantastic growth in Finland and Estonia throughout 2019 and we are also seeing rapid adoption in Germany and recently the Netherlands. We expect the first brands to go live in Denmark by the end of the year and are hoping the product has a disruptive impact on this market, which has traditionally been card-focused.last_img read more

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