West Brom name Irvine head coach

first_imgWest Brom have announced former Preston and Sheffield Wednesday manager Alan Irvine as their new head coach on a 12-month rolling contract. Press Association The Scot will succeed Pepe Mel, who left the club by mutual consent the day after the Barclays Premier League season finished last month, once he “signs off” from his current role as Everton’s academy manager. Rob Kelly, who worked under Irvine at Preston and Wednesday, has also been appointed joint assistant head coach, alongside Keith Downing. center_img Albion technical director Terry Burton told the club’s official website: “I’m delighted we have been able to secure the services of Alan and Rob.” The Baggies had been heavily linked with former Tottenham coach Tim Sherwood and Saturday’s news may be slightly underwhelming for Baggies fans, given Irvine’s lack of management experience in the top flight. The Glaswegian was sacked at both Preston and Wednesday, who were relegated to League One under his tenure, and he has not taken charge of a club since leaving Hillsborough in 2011. However, he has played a prominent role at Everton, helping to bring through the likes of Ross Barkley and Jack Rodwell to the senior team. And the Baggies are now convinced they have the set-up in place – with Dean Kiely remaining as goalkeeping coach – to improve on last season’s 17th-placed Premier League finish. Burton added: “With the support of Keith and Dean, we firmly believe we have put in place the right coaching team to move the club forward. “From the outset, we decided to pursue candidates who are renowned for their coaching ability and Alan was very much at the forefront of our thoughts because of his achievements in the Premier League and the high regard he is held within the game. “In the end it came down to two outstanding candidates for the role. “But, following a detailed recruitment process, we decided Alan and the team around him are best suited to tackle the challenges we face in the Barclays Premier League. “He has a vast knowledge from grassroots up thanks to the roles he has performed during his decades in the game and knows what it takes through good and testing times.” last_img read more

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Morrison tallies career-high coming off bench for Syracuse

first_img Published on December 1, 2014 at 11:08 pm Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettus Facebook Twitter Google+ With 8:52 to go in the first half and Vermont up by two, Syracuse point guard Alexis Peterson grabbed a steal and guard Maggie Morrison sprinted to the other end of the court. Peterson fed Morrison, who caught the ball and settled, bringing her right foot toward her body before sinking a 3 as a Catamounts defender closed in.Two and half minutes later, Morrison launched another 3 that bounced off the back of the rim and fell in, starting an 18-5 run that the Orange took into the break.After a foul, Morrison went the bench and high-fived a line of waiting teammates.“It was a good open look and that’s what we have to take,” SU head coach Quentin Hillsman said. “We can’t pass up open shots. She did a very good job of just knocking down an open three and that’s all we can ask for is when you’re open, shoot the ball and knock it down.”After being held scoreless in three of the first four games she played this season, Morrison scored eight points in the first half and totaled a career-high 11 on the night. Her two 3s started the deciding run that reclaimed the game for No. 21 Syracuse in the first half. Morrison logged 21 minutes off the bench, grabbing three rebounds and two steals, and shot a team-high 60 percent from beyond the arc in SU’s (5-1) 94-63 win over Vermont (0-6) in the Carrier Dome on Monday.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“It felt good,” Morrison said. “I’ve been struggling in the first couple games this season, but you know having the support and the belief of my teammates and my coaching staff has kept my confidence high and energy high.“It just went in today I guess.”With the Orange up 35-29, Morrison missed two shots in a row before sprinting back on defense in frustration. She snagged a defensive rebound then drew a foul, sinking the two ensuing free throws to continue SU’s run — each one with a bounce and a spin of the ball in her hands preceding the shot.She went to the bench again, hardly staying in her seat while yelling at the defense to “keep it tight.” When she returned to the court three minutes later, she grabbed a steal that gave SU its final possession of the half.Coming out of the break, Morrison stayed on the bench until 14:36 to go in the second half, when Hillsman practically threw her onto the court.She ran to the top of the key, faced the net and drained her third 3 of the game. The SU bench rose to its feet, each player hoisting three fingers in the air.Morrison watched her shot fall, then turned to find to her player to guard on defense.“Maggie is one of our best shooters on this team,” Peterson said. “Everybody has their nights and I know Maggie is capable of doing that every night.”And though Morrison had shown moments of frustration throughout the game, the transfer from Vanderbilt who sat out all of last season was the first one jogging toward the locker room following the game — laughing and smiling.“We need her to make shots,” Hillsman said. “I thought that tonight she did a very good job of taking every open shot. … If she can continue to do that and add another spark that’s coming off the bench, that’s going to be pretty good.” Commentslast_img read more

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Wildhack: ‘We appreciate and support’ NCAA’s process to allow college athletes to profit off likeness

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 29, 2019 at 5:25 pm Contact Danny: [email protected] | @DannyEmerman The NCAA Board of Governors unanimously voted Tuesday to start the process of changing rules to allow college athletes to profit off their name, image and likeness. Michael V. Drake, chair of the board, said the vote directs each of the NCAA’s three divisions to immediately consider updating relevant bylaws and policies for the 21st century, per the NCAA’s press release. The board members said that all “modernization” should assure that college athletes are treated similarly to all other students, maintain the priorities of education and the collegiate experience, and emphasize competitive balance. The board also set a January 2021 deadline for each division to create new rules. When contacted by The Daily Orange for more information about the language of the board’s guidelines, the NCAA provided no further comment.“We appreciate and support the NCAA Board of Governors’ recent action that paves the way for student-athletes to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness in a manner consistent with the collegiate model,” Syracuse Director of Athletics John Wildhack said in a statement. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Syracuse University will continue to elevate all aspects of our student-athletes’ experience. This includes providing enhanced academic support, holistic health and wellness resources and integrated academic advising and career planning,” Wildhack said. “These actions, and others, further position our student-athletes for success on the playing fields, in the classroom and beyond.”The news comes as several state legislatures have proposed bills that would allow college athletes to be compensated. California’s Fair Pay to Play Act was signed into law in September and allows college athletes in the state to profit from their likeness and hire agents. The NCAA Board of Governors previously condemned the California bill, saying it would “erase the critical distinction between college and professional athletics.” According to an ESPN report, the NCAA’s new rules will not follow the “California model” of a virtually unrestricted market. New York State Senator Kevin Parker proposed a bill in September that would evenly distribute 15% of every athletic department’s annual revenue to college athletes. Based on data provided by the university, SU Athletics generated $96,722,491 in total revenue across all sports in 2017-18, the most recent public figure.This story has been updated with additional reporting from Senior Staff Writer Michael McCleary.  Commentslast_img read more

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