Three seriously injured in Waldron house fire

first_imgWaldron, In. — Three family members are battling critical injuries suffered in a Waldron fire earlier this week. The father, nine-year-old girl and a five-year-old boy are all in critical condition at Indianapolis area hospitals.The mother and a three-year-old girl were treated and released at a local hospital.A report from the Waldron Fire Department says just after midnight on Wednesday firefighters responded to the report of a structure fire with entrapment in the 100 block of Pearl Street.Investigators say the father pulled family members through a front window except a nine-year-old before firefighters arrived. The girl was quickly rescued from the home when firefighters arrived.The cause of the fire remains under investigation, it is believed to be accidental.last_img

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Hoosier deer hunters cautioned about bovine TB found in Michigan

first_imgAnn Arbor, Mi. — Bovine tuberculosis was recently confirmed in a large beef herd in Alcona County. This herd, which is the 73rd cattle herd to be identified with bovine TB in Michigan since 1998, was identified through routine surveillance testing.Bovine TB is an infectious bacterial disease primarily affecting cattle. It is endemic in the free-ranging white-tailed deer population in Michigan’s modified accredited zone, a USDA designation for Alcona, Alpena, Montmorency and Oscoda counties. Annual surveillance and movement testing are required of cattle producers, which helps catch the disease early and prevents it from being moved off the farm.“In the modified accredited zone, anything shared by deer and cattle can be a potential source of bovine tuberculosis infection,” said Michigan’s Assistant State Veterinarian Nancy Barr, DVM. “Preventing deer from having contact with cattle feed, feed storage or watering areas is crucial for farmers in this area of Michigan and a part of wildlife biosecurity programs being implemented.”last_img read more

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Mapmaker Phil Arnold dies at 96

first_imgPhil Arnold definitely left his mark on the Vancouver area.For more than 60 years, Arnold created maps that illustrated the growth of Clark County.Arnold, 96, died Saturday at the Hough neighborhood home he shared with his wife, Helen, for almost 71 years. It was a home that doubled as a business office for Arnold Map Service.For a segment filmed by Seattle’s King TV when Phil Arnold was 85, visithttp://www.king5.com/on-tv/evening-magazine/Map-maker-114724234.htmlThe maps were sold downstairs; Arnold’s mapmaking office was upstairs. That’s where he carefully inked every new road, drew every new school and lettered the name of every new street that filled in the county’s cartographic blanks.He did it all by hand, long after most people choose to — or are forced to — call it a career.“He had cataract surgery after his 90th birthday,” Janice Arnold said. “His eyes were so critical.”In addition to his keen eyes, “What was so incredibly amazing was his steady hand. He could draw these tiny things: really amazing,” she said.He is survived by Helen, their sons, Phil Jr. and Dean, and daughter Janice. Phil Jr. and his wife, Kathy, have been operating the business for the past few years and will continue to sell Arnold’s maps.Arnold’s old-school craftsmanship got a nod from Gov. Chris Gregoire a few days after he turned 90 on Oct. 27, 2005. The Arnolds visited her Olympia office, where Gregoire issued a proclamation describing him as “most likely the oldest working cartographer in the world.”last_img read more

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