A private chat with fellow attorneys is a click away

first_img “As lawyers, we’ve always talked about the ideals of public service and serving the client and the great good we can do in a democracy and all that razmatazz,” Krieger said. “And lawyers who are following that ideal are more satisfied. But the money thing is always the big thing. And people forget that, yes, their family is as important, more important/ The deep parts of our values and ideals that make us people can be expressed in the law in marvelously helpful ways. But too many lawyers forget, and get lost in billable hours or the next client. It’s easy to get lost, because it’s hard work.” The bottom line: “If one is not happy, what is the point?” Krieger asks that question in an article he wrote for the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law’s Journal of Law and Health, titled “What We’re Not Telling Law Students — and Lawyers — that they Really Need to Know: Some Thoughts-In-Action Toward Revitalizing the Profession from its Roots” (Volume 13, Issue I, 1998-99). “Legal educators need to explicitly acknowledge the reality which is increasingly dawning on unhappy practitioners: There is much more to a good life as a lawyer than constant achievement. Students must learn early to work toward their very best while keeping personal health, happiness and life balance as absolute priorities. Otherwise, giving up qualtiy of life now may well become a lifelong mistake.” Krieger goes on to say, “It is no coincidence that the common caricature of lawyers includes shallowness, greed and dishonesty — qualities that manifest in a personal environment devoid of real meaning. And a high rate of addiction among lawyers, by definition, reflects a loss of connection with our feelings and inner self.” Krieger, once a prosecutor, knows well how busy lawyers are — often too busy to seek help or even attend a CLE class on stress management. “Our committee felt that lawyers feel too busy, and we get isolated,” he said. “With isolation can come a sense of depression, which can make people dive even more into work.” And ’round and ’round it goes. The electronic discussion board, Krieger hopes, is a safe chance to have a chat with a fellow lawyer, maybe someone who will say, “I know what you mean. I’ve been there. And I made this change that has really helped. Why don’t you try it?” June 1, 2000 Regular News The drive to be the best, and that only the best will succeed. Relentless competition in a win-lose arena. Performance and appearaces are crucially important. Unyielding devotion leads to excessive hours of work. Being so analytical, you lose touch with your inner feelings and conscience. A private chat with fellow attorneys is a click away Take a deep breath and try to answer this question honestly: How often do you meet a happy lawyer? That’s what we thought. You know what the research reveals: More than a third of lawyers say they are “highly dissatisfied;” an even higher number wish they could flee the profession. Lawyers have the highest rate of major depressive disorders among 104 occupational groups, and lawyers rank fifth among all occupational groups in committing suicide. “All the studies and figures indicate that this is one of the most stressful professions,” says Michael Cohen, chair of The Florida Bar’s Quality of Life/Stress Management Committee. “The whole thrust is that you don’t need to be working 60 to 80 hours and making X dollars to be happy. Maybe make less and have more time for family and get back to the practice of law would make you happier.” Cohen advises there’s great comfort in knowing you’re not alone, and that it’s a lot better to talk about your concerns and problems early on, before stress can lead to addiction, alcoholism, neglecting clients and ethical problems. That’s why his committee has come up with a new resource to help: a confidential electronic discussion group as a convenient and confidential way for lawyers to vent and chat about stress or other problems, and, hopefully, colleagues will be ready to supply construction solutions. From the privacy of your home or office, click on www.law.fsu.edu:8080/~happylawyer or it can be accessed from the Quality of Life/Stress Management web page at www.fla-lap.org/qlsm/. What you’ll find is the discussion board, “Happy Lawyer is Not an Oxymoron: Health and Satisfaction in the Profession,” (a pithy title created by Tampa attorney Diane Vogt) that bills itself as a confidential, password-protected electronic discussion group maintained primarily for members of The Florida Bar who are “seeking greater happiness, health and balance in their lives, or who would like to share their efforts and methods of maximizing those qualities in their lives as lawyers.” The site is maintained at Florida State University College of Law, where Dean Don Weidner believes: “It is important for our law school to be involved in the life of the profession. I hope we can be of real service to practitioners seeking to lead balanced professional, personal and even spiritual lives.” Manager of the site is Larry Krieger, vice-chair of the committee and a clinical professor at FSU’s College of Law. In preparing his students for externship clinics in criminal law, he also teaches his students about the pitfalls of the profession that can easily lead to stressed, out-of-balance, unhappy lives: A private chat with fellow attorneys is a click awaylast_img read more

Read More →

Ambris praised for the transformation of his game

first_imgLINCOLN, New Zealand (CMC) – West Indies latest batting recruit, Sunil Ambris, has been praised for the way he has transformed his game, in order to make the rise to the international level.The 24-year-old has scored heavily over the last year, subsequently forcing his way into the West Indies one-day squad before being recently called up for the Test tour of New Zealand.He sent a clear signal to tour selectors with an audacious 153 off 145 balls in the three-day tour match against New Zealand A which ended here yesterday.“Having seen Sunil at the Under-19 level – he obviously toured Australia with the West Indies in 2012 when I was coach – I know Sunil quite well,” said assistant coach Roddy Estwick.“What he has done (since then), he’s made adjustments to his game. He doesn’t hit the ball much in the air at all, he knows where to find a single, he’s quite organised. He’s carried the good form forward.”The right-handed Ambris was in superb form in the last first class season, amassing 608 runs at an average of 43 – including a cracking double century of 231 against Leeward Islands Hurricanes in March.He also piled up 423 runs in the Regional Super50 to be one of the leading run-getters.On the one-day tour of England last September, he stroked an unbeaten 38 in his only innings before returning to the Caribbean to plunder two centuries in the two-match four-day ‘Test’ series against Sri Lanka A.“I thought he batted well in the one game he played in England and he went to the A team and got two centuries as well, so he’s brought that confidence and that form (with him),” Estwick noted.Last weekend’s hundred helped Ambris press his case for a spot in the starting XI in the first Test against the Black Caps bowling off December 1 in Wellington.But Estwick said aside from Ambris’s form, what had impressed him even more was the player’s attitude to improvement.“What I admired most about him when the fast bowlers wanted to have a workout during the first day (of the tour match),” Estwick explained.“Sunil was the first to put his pads on and he said to me, ‘I’m batting the five best fast bowlers in the region’ and the best five best fast bowlers had about an hour, hour-and-a-half bowling at him.“He was able to bat them and he took that knock straight out in the middle and you could see the benefits from it.”last_img read more

Read More →

Syracuse falls to Miami, 69-65, in overtime to close regular season

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ CORAL GABLES, Fla. — Joe Girard III sized up his defender at the elbow, stepped back and squared his shoulders in a shooting motion. There were just over 30 seconds left in overtime. His runner at the end of regulation had prolonged a largely inconsequential game. But Girard telegraphed this one. The shots hadn’t fallen most of the game. Girard looked for them anyway because, in spots, he was Syracuse’s only chance. He willed his team to score and took it himself in the game’s biggest moments.After SU’s loss, Girard shrugged. In the grand scheme of the game where he shot 5-of-17, his regulation heroics were a short-lived outlier. His overtime pull-up rimmed out. “Throughout the whole game, we have to make shots like (the one at the end of regulation), and we didn’t do that,” Girard said. “That one just happened to go in at that time.”On paper, Saturday’s matchup with Miami (15-15, 7-13 Atlantic Coast) was an anomaly in the sense that Syracuse (17-14, 10-10) won’t be the more talented team often, if ever, in the coming weeks as the ACC tournament looms. Still, against one of the worst teams in the ACC and without Elijah Hughes for the final 25 minutes, Syracuse was out-rebounded, out-hustled and outplayed on its way to a 69-65 overtime loss filled with missed shots around the arc. In the final game before a stretch where it’s not only critical but also necessary that the Orange explode, SU fell flat, going 5-for-25 (20%) from behind the arc. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe result Saturday meant little: Win or lose, an ACC tournament title is the only sure track to the NCAA Tournament. A loss only worsens its ACC seeding. For as good as the flashes the Orange had given all year long, there are games like this interspersed. Ones that bring back reality. Ones that prove head coach Jim Boeheim right that Syracuse is “not good enough.”“Maybe we’re not a good 3-point shooting team,” Boeheim said. “I mean, the evidence is there.”The start to Saturday’s game was perhaps the Orange’s ugliest of the season. Syracuse shot terribly and the game, though sloppy, took no stoppages as missed shots clanked off the rim and into the hands of the opposite team. There were live-ball turnovers and contact rarely led to a whistle. As a result, SU’s mistakes meshed together.Hughes missed a layup at the rim. Bourama Sidibe was stripped down low. Buddy Boeheim and Girard missed shot after shot. Howard Washington — whose two-minute stretch usually comes as a palate-cleanser after early-game mistakes — passed the ball to Quincy Guerrier in the corner, followed the pass and led his defender over to trap Guerrier in the corner with the ball.The Orange entered the second half down two, and Hughes scratched his head from the SU bench with his hood pulled over. He wouldn’t return for the Orange because of an apparent head injury, and the second half perhaps started even uglier. Aside from a Girard 3-pointer, SU scored little in the first 10 minutes. But Miami scored less. After Guerrier bumped a Hurricane defender and scored as he was knocked down, Syracuse looked primed to pull away. When he missed the free throw, though, Boeheim sunk his chin into his hand on the bench and the Hurricanes answered with multiple 3-pointers to tie the game once again.The mistakes kept coming: Buddy lost a ball on a breakaway and had his layup blocked. Syracuse missed crucial free throws. It didn’t rotate when even the smallest contest had caused the Hurricanes to struggle shooting. And the shots that Syracuse has used to create its biggest runs all season long eluded them.“You never want to shoot bad,” Buddy said.There was always an opening, and that continued. Girard hit a runner when Syracuse needed it in the final seconds of regulation. Then, Isaiah Wong traveled and Syracuse tied the game one final time. But in overtime, Miami’s offense was there. Syracuse’s wasn’t. After Wong’s 3-pointer fell through the basket midway through the overtime period, SU quickly took it out of bounds. Girard waved his hand and the ball came right to him. This time he didn’t have a plan. There wasn’t one shot that could bring SU back into the game. Syracuse needed to put together multiple. Girard ushered the momentum and asked his teammates to follow, a request that had been futile all game long. The result put them in the same spot they were before: An underdog in the conference tournament. And it can’t lose again.“I feel like I don’t want to lose or we can’t lose any game,” Girard said. “So, it’s nothing new.” Comments Published on March 7, 2020 at 6:41 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @MikeJMcClearylast_img read more

Read More →