Should I Make My Child Go to Summer Camp?

first_imgDear Mountain Mama,I’m trying to convince my 13-year-old daughter to go to camp, but she doesn’t want to go. As a child, my parents didn’t have extra money to afford the extras like summer camp.  I want to expose her to as many outdoor activities as possible. Should I register her for camp anyway?Yours,Just Want a Happy Camper———————————————————————————- Dear Just Want a Happy Camper,As parents, we want what’s best for our children. Our kids might not see it that way, especially when they are on the road toward adulthood. But parenting should be more like a benevolent dictatorship than a democracy, at least until kids turn 18.My niece didn’t want to go to camp. My brother, who is one of those model parents who makes raising kids look easy, sat down with her and looked at several different options. She didn’t want to go to any of them. She was afraid she wouldn’t meet any friends. She didn’t think any of them sounded fun. In the end, even he was exasperated and told her if she couldn’t decide on a camp, he was going to pick one for her. That’s how she ended up at sailing camp last week.After the first day, she came home and told him, “Thanks for making me go. I love it!” She had fun even though she had to jump into a river with jellyfish in order to pass the mandatory swimming test. I suspect being afraid and overcoming her fear actually made the experience all the more rewarding.After the first week, she came home and said, “That was the best week of my life.” She made friends. She and her new friends got to sail a boat. A sudden thunderstorm caused the winds to pick up, which capsized their boats. The girls managed to right the sailboat themselves, and sail back to the dock before all the other campers.As my niece told me about her day, there was a gleam in her eye. She had encountered nature on her own terms. She had a new connection with the river, and a certain confidence that she could handle what came her way.Just Want a Happy Camper, you might have to endure some unpleasant pre-camp jitters in order to have a happy camper. Just remind yourself that in the process, your child will learn skills that will serve her well. Your responsibility as a parent is to provide the gentle push she needs to help her overcome her fears and take risks! Yours,Mountain MamaLooking into camp for your child? Check out our Summer Camps Guide!last_img read more

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When should a credit union hire a consultant?

first_img 26SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Kirk Drake Kirk Drake is founder and CEO of Ongoing Operations, LLC, a rapidly growing CUSO that provides complete business continuity and technology solutions. With its recent acquisition of Cloudworks, Ongoing Operations … Web: www.ongoingoperations.com Details Credit Unions love investing in their people, but that doesn’t stop them from hiring consultants. Lots of consultants. Consultants can be great, and sometimes, they can prove not so great. With ever increasing threats from regulation, cyber security, fintechs and underling business model challenges – The question of when to hire a consultant arises more and more frequently. Over the years, Ongoing Operations has struggled to hire and find the right consultants at the right times. Luckily, we’ve found consultants to successfully serve specific functions such as babysitting (we need it sometimes) us through a solution, working us through a benchmark, or taking work off our plate.  Here are the five types of situations where it’s been beneficial for us to bring in a consultant: You are in need of specialized knowledge you don’t haveMaybe you have a sophisticated fraud issue. Maybe you need some cyber expertise, a DR plan or some help on your investment portfolio. Outside consultants have specialties and depth in subjects that can help avoid major pitfalls. After all, they’ve had the breadth of solving similar problems multiple times over. In addition, they can help establish a framework or toolkit that gets you running quickly and points your team in the right direction without sticking around forever. Last year, Ongoing Operations brought in Joey Coleman, a consultant to help our team find repetitive service defects and institute a process to identify and treat service breakdowns.  The results were amazing.  In a single expensive day, we worked through huge volumes of experience and quickly improved many key areas. Joey helped spawn lots of light bulbs all over the organization and his depth of expertise was not something we could never organically develop.    You have a major issueWhether a PR issue, a service issue, a team issue or an audit-related issue, whatever it is, a consultant can help by bringing their expertise to attack a problem efficiently and effectively. Sometimes it takes an outside individual to demand the attention of boards and management teams, driving them to get down and dirty quickly in order to put an issue to bed once and for all.You need to deliver bad newsI don’t love this one, but a lot of times consultants are brought in to deliver bad news or critical messages. Having an outsider take the ire of a committee or board is a great way to deflect the pain, deliver the message, and move on. The team, board, or auditor may dislike the person for a long-time to come because they delivered an uncomfortable lesson – but either way – you are free to join in the cause with your colleagues while accomplishing a key task. You need improvement in a specific areaHiring a consultant to help you improve in a key area is a great idea. Having the awareness of a particular goal or differentiator, then finding an expert for the purposes of fine tuning or tweaking what you are already good at, can really help your credit union move from good to great.  We have seen this work firsthand by helping credit unions with network designs, cyber security roadmaps, disaster recovery plans and many other areas.  As consultants these are great projects too – they push us to get better when someone is already a believer and good at what we do and we can always find more ways to define success and improve for our clients! You’d like to provide training for your teamMaybe you just did a core conversion or maybe you are trying to improve your digital experience. Either way, it may make sense to hire a consultant who is skilled at training people, and who can coach your entire staff at once (or individually). A coach, trainer or consultant will not only have the materials to facilitate learning quickly they will often have scorecards, frameworks, and how-to materials that accelerate the learning much faster. There is nothing better than getting 20 stories that prevent 20 problems.  Innovation is often just the next conclusion based on the last path taken – a consultant can help you see 20 more paths down the road that you then don’t have to stumble through!These are the five types of situations in which we have benefitted from hire consultants. A lot of these situations can be interconnected. For example, you probably desire someone with specialized knowledge to attack a specific problem or train your team in a specific area. If you are wondering whether you should hire a consultant and you can link it back to one or more of these five reasons, then chances are, you should go for it.Working with a consultant in pretty much any area of the credit union can help contain long-term costs, train your team, establish frameworks, deliver hard messages, and help you achieve success much faster than organically learning and fumbling along your journey!last_img read more

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