MBB : Cohen: Boeheim’s apology for insensitive comments on allegations comes too late

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ It’s about time the finger was pointed in the right direction.The three self-inflicted jabs at his own chest during the press conference after Syracuse knocked off No. 10 Florida finally expressed the sentiments long overdue from Jim Boeheim.‘I believe I have misspoke very badly in my response to the allegations that have been made,’ Boeheim said. ‘I shouldn’t have questioned what the accusers expressed or their motives. I am really sorry that I did that, and I regret any harm that I caused. It was insensitive to the individuals involved and especially to the overall issue of child abuse.’As Boeheim read from a written statement Friday night — doing so for the second time in as many games — his words seemed sincere. Speaking slowly and with clear difficulty following Syracuse’s 72-68 win over the Gators, Boeheim issued an apology for his comments made ‘without thinking’ last week following allegations of sexual abuse against then-associate head coach Bernie Fine.He was sorry for calling Bobby Davis and Mike Lang — both of whom were former SU ball boys when Fine began allegedly molesting them — liars. He was sorry he spouted off at the mouth and said they were only looking for money in the wake of the Penn State scandal.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textI’m sorry, too. I’m sorry his apology is eons too late.Let’s put aside the fact that Boeheim’s baseless comments never should have been uttered to begin with. That goes without saying.But Boeheim had since Sunday, when Syracuse University Chancellor Nancy Cantor made the decision to fire Fine, to step forward and publicly state that his remarks were ludicrous. That he didn’t seem pompous. Like he wasn’t capable of admitting his brash insensitivity.The chances have been there, too. The statement Boeheim issued following Fine’s firing said he regrets any comments that ‘might have inhibited’ anyone with information from coming forward or that ‘might have’ been insensitive to victims of abuse.Then, after Tuesday’s game against Eastern Michigan, it was Boeheim saying his statements were made based on the information he knew at the time.Never did he take full responsibility for speaking brazenly about the plight of alleged victims of whom he knew nothing about.‘What I said last week was out of loyalty,’ Boeheim said. ‘I reacted without thinking. I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. I’m trying to learn from my mistake, and this has been hard for me.’Boeheim said after the game against Florida that he spent Thursday afternoon at the McMahon/Ryan Child Advocacy Center in Syracuse talking with the director and several other people at the nonprofit organization dedicated to putting a stop to child abuse.He vowed to do more going forward to help raise awareness and get the message out about child abuse. He said the issue of abuse is the ‘No. 1 thing’ that the Syracuse community should be concerned with.And that’s all great. It’s great that Boeheim finally seems to get it. His words seemed genuine. And his tone of voice relayed a message indicative of legitimate introspection. Kris Joseph attested to that. Having been around Boeheim for four years, he said any apology from the head coach must have been real.‘If he apologized, it’s because he really meant it,’ Joseph said. ‘He’s loyal, he’s an honest man. So if he said it, then he meant it.’But the fact remains that Boeheim will never be able to go back in time. He cannot take back what he said, and he cannot undo any emotional damage the remarks may have caused to the accusers.He said the situation has been ‘everything’ for him this week and admitted that he didn’t really think about Friday’s game in the days leading up to it. He could focus in practice, he said, but outside the gym it consumed him.As he did during his press conference Tuesday, Boeheim repeated that his forthcoming remarks were of his own desire, that no one from the university or elsewhere told him what to say or to say anything at all.But it appears that maybe it’s time for someone to realize that Boeheim must be controlled.No one shushed him last week, and we saw the results. No one made him apologize this week, and by the time he chose to do so, it was beyond late.Boeheim has admitted that sometimes he says more than people would like him to. Isn’t that enough of a cue for someone to step in?‘I think in the comments it shows what I’ve learned,’ Boeheim said.We’ll see.Michael Cohen is the sports editor for The Daily Orange, where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at [email protected], or on Twitter at @Michael_Cohen13.  Published on December 2, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @Michael_Cohen13center_img Commentslast_img read more

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Badgers suffer hockey heartbreak

first_imgForward Brooke Ammerman takes a moment to collect herself following Sunday’s loss.[/media-credit]DULUTH, Minn. – You can’t win them all.The Minnesota women’s hockey team defeated Wisconsin 4-2 in the NCAA Division I championship game Sunday afternoon, denying the Badgers their fifth title.The Badgers found themselves trailing early, but fought back to tie the game at two before Minnesota regained control of the game.Minnesota scored its third goal late in the first period off an Emily West penalty shot and relied on tough defense and lock-down goaltending the rest of the way.In the later periods, Wisconsin could not find a way to phase UM goalie Noora Raty. Despite giving up two goals in the first period, Raty recorded 42 saves, making game-saving blocks throughout the afternoon. As the nation’s top defense this season, Raty and the Minnesota defensemen slowed down Patty Kazmaier winner Brianna Decker and the rest of UW’s top forwards.Senior forward Hilary Knight and the Badgers’ put 44 shots on goal – 19 more than the Gophers – but only managed to score twice.Afterward, Knight stressed the importance of not getting frustrated by tough defense and goaltending.“You just have to stay positive,” Knight said. “When you’re working hard the bounces are going to come, at least when you’re in the moment, you think they are and you’re going to capitalize on them.”Despite a disappointing end to another stellar season, Wisconsin players and coaches were proud of the team’s resiliency – especially during the first period comeback.Head coach Mark Johnson liked his team’s effort, but said a few missed opportunities left his team on the losing end.“It’s a tough pill to swallow,” Johnson said, who has won four titles with the Badgers.Knight – Wisconsin’s all-time leading goal scorer – did not end her career at Wisconsin the way she had imagined, but she remained proud of her team.“We can walk out of here knowing that we fought valiantly,” Knight said. “And I’m so proud of everyone sitting to the right and left of me in the locker room and just being a part of something so great and so special.”Wisconsin got off to a rough start, giving up two goals early in the first period.Minnesota forward Amanda Kessel opened the game’s scoring. Coming off a center ice faceoff, the speedy sophomore faked out UW goaltender Alex Rigsby before finding the right side of the net.Minnesota continued its hot start thanks to a Sarah Erickson’s deep one-timer goal, further setting the tone for the Gophers play early.The high-paced, intense first period quickly turned in Wisconsin’s favor after it responded with two goals of its own.UW junior defenseman Stefanie McKeough struck first, capitalizing on the Badgers’ first power play of the game. McKeough scored on a deep wrist shot with just two seconds remaining on the power play.Less than two minutes later, UW forward Brooke Ammerman tapped in a short goal off a rebound to even the score at two.But Minnesota again swung the momentum in its favor once and for all after West’s penalty shot goal.The rest of the game featured the tough defense and goaltending of Minnesota. The only other goal of the game came from Erickson once again early in the third period, making a Wisconsin comeback extremely difficult.It is a disappointing end for a Badger squad that ranked No. 1 nationally for all but one week of the year. Wisconsin finished the regular season as WCHA champions as well, but Minnesota earned the season’s most important victory.Despite the disappointment, Knight could not have been more proud of the way Wisconsin played.“Not once in that game did we ever give up, and I think that’s the important thing that we can take away from here,” Knight said. “Again, at the end of the day it is a loss and it hurts, but we had a great season and I’m proud to be a part of such a great group.”last_img read more

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Ikeh thanks Ravena for Finals MVP recognition

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netFor normal spectators, Chibueze Ikeh is just another big man in Ateneo’s roster.Thirdy Ravena, though, begged to differ.ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. MOST READ Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Finals hero Isaac Go says entire Ateneo team is ‘clutch’ Ravena, though, said that Ikeh is far from a role player.“There are things that people don’t see because it’s the intangibles that he brings,” said Ravena in Filipino. “You don’t see it the stats but I saw Ikeh the whole, he did his job, he did his best to limit Ben, and execute the game plan.”Mbala finished with 19 points, on 7-of-14 shooting, with seven rebounds while being matched up mostly with Ikeh.ADVERTISEMENT View commentscenter_img It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson LATEST STORIES Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ As the Blue Eagles celebrated their ninth UAAP title after beating De La Salle 88-86 in the third game of the Season 80 Finals, Finals MVP Ravena called Ikeh to join him under the bright lights of Smart Araneta Coliseum.“I wasn’t expecting that, he’s been one of a kind,” said Ikeh who finished with 12 points, 13 rebounds, and two blocks Sunday in the title-clincher. “For him to share that moment with me, it feels so great, I really appreciate that.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkIkeh never got the same reputation like other big men in the league like two-time MVP Ben Mbala, Steve Akomo, Prince Orizu, or Issa Gaye as dominating centers.Despite Ikeh’s 6-foot-8 frame, he was just seen as a mere filler in the center position of Ateneo’s system. PH’s Rogen Ladon boxing flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS) PLAY LIST 03:30PH’s Rogen Ladon boxing flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)00:50Trending Articles03:34PH’s Carlo Paalam boxing light flyweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scenelast_img read more

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