Brazilian Armed Forces Assist Flood Victims

first_imgBy Andréa Barretto/Diálogo July 12, 2017 Pernambuco and Alagoas are two northeastern states in Brazil that usually suffer from long periods of drought. Since the end of May, the scenario has been different. Heavy rains led local authorities to declare a state of emergency in 50 cities. Floods and mudslides affected more than 48,000 people. Of those, nearly 3,000 lost their homes. The disaster prompted Brazil’s Ministry of Defense to ask the Armed Forces to help those in need. Members of the Brazilian Navy (MB, per its Portuguese acronym), and the Brazilian Air Force (FAB, per its Portuguese acronym), concentrated on the deployment of people and the transport of supplies, and joined the Brazilian Army (EB, per its Portuguese acronym) in the work coordinated by the latter in two field hospitals. The city of Rio Formoso in the state of Pernambuco was the first to receive one of the field hospitals, since the water had flooded the municipal hospital, resulting in lost equipment and hampering operations. From June 2nd to 5th the city’s population only had the assistance offered by 34 Armed Forces professionals who worked there. Another hospital was set up in Marechal Deodoro in the state of Alagoas, where the rains mainly caused damage in the historical town center, which remained partially submerged, accessible only by canoe. The EB structure set up in this town helped three more municipalities and also involved 34 service members. They were deployed on June 23rd, once the activities of the region’s health institutions returned to normal. “Each field hospital has 10 barracks, and doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and nurse technicians, including service members from the Brazilian Army, Navy, and Air Force,” said Brazilian Army Colonel Maria Sandra Andrade, from the Health Inspector’s Office of the 7th Military Region in Pernambuco, and coordinator of the Field Hospital for the Northeast Military Command. The barracks used measured 48 square meters each. The combination of a dozen of these structures allows the hospitals set up in Rio Formoso and Marechal Deodoro to have a triage and welcome section, a room for urgent and emergency care, outpatient clinics to attend four patients simultaneously, a nursing center, and a pharmacy. An observation section, where patients stayed for up to 24 hours, and a section to perform procedures such as suturing, bandaging, administering drugs, and applying splints to fractures was also set up. Additionally, the field hospital in Rio Formoso has a laboratory for tests and clinical analysis not found at the Marechal Deodoro structure. The latter, by way of compensation, had X-ray machines that were not available to the other city. In the two hospitals, the main complaints directly related to the floods were vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and respiratory complications. “Many problems were caused by contact with contaminated water, difficulty storing food, and the isolation of some communities,” explained Col. Sandra. She also recalled cases of anxiety attacks in those in shock over the loss of their possessions, their homes, and even loved ones. “This type of mission is very sensitive because the people receive serious cases and simple cases, but they are all involved in the complexity of an emergency situation due to the storms,” she stated. In the Marechal Deodoro hospital, around 450 people received assistance during 19 days of operation. In Rio Formoso, that number rose to approximately 3,000 people, according to a survey conducted June 29th, a week before the structure started to be dismantled. Among the many incidents that marked the emergency mission, one stood out. On June 8th, an 18-year-old woman arrived at the Rio Formoso field hospital ready to give birth. The delivery was performed by a civilian doctor, who was a member of the team, with the aid of a military pediatrician, who was responsible for first aid and evaluation of the infant. “Everything went very well. They baby was very healthy and the mother remained calm. It was a special moment for everyone,” recalled Col. Sandra. Deployments and transport of supplies FAB deployed 12 airmen from the Rio de Janeiro-based Puma Squadron to the mission in Pernambuco and Alagoas. The team employed an H-36 Caracal helicopter to carry food, water, and other supplies to the areas most affected by the rains, as well as to transport the homeless. MB’s participation had the same goal. Ten service members were deployed in a UH-15 helicopter from the 2nd General Use Helicopter Squadron, also based in Rio de Janeiro. The Crisis Cabinet located in Recife, the capital of Pernambuco, was in charge of coordinating the assistance offered by the armed forces and other governmental agencies. “As for the flights, the coordination was done between the cabinet, the Navy, and the Air Force between 8:00 AM and 6:00 PM every day,” reported Rear Admiral Flávio Augusto Viana Rocha, the director of the Navy’s Social Communication Center. “The Armed Forces are characterized by the capacity to mobilize, work together, and the unending search for the common good,” he added. Members of the 15th Wing, an operational unit of FAB based in Recife, were also partnered with a non-governmental organization from that city and participated in the triage of the wounded, separating supplies, and loading the trucks with the donations that were delivered to the population in the most critical regions.last_img read more

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Trustly’s Nicholas Tucker: Fast payments, fast answers and fast Pay N Play pick up

first_img Internet Vikings appoints ‘marketing pro’ Stefan Backlund as corporate advisor March 20, 2020 Related Articles StumbleUpon Share SBC Magazine Issue 8: International expansion and picking up the sporting slack April 7, 2020 Share Submit SBC Digital Summit: ‘Cashless’ environments to take centre stage when retail returns – Samuel Barrett April 30, 2020 Fresh from completing a research study into ‘The Power of Fast Payments’ that yielded such an eye-catching set of takeaways for the industry, we went back to Trustly to delve deeper into the data that really matters for gambling operators.We’ve taken an educated guess that those interested in fast payments may also be here looking for fast answers. So, for the quick and easy responses from Head of Sales Nicholas Tucker, here goes: Has the value of payments been overlooked by the industry? No. Has the ‘race to the bottom’ approach to bonusing opened the door for payment innovation? Definitely. Are operators unjustifiably concerned about losing revenues from instant withdrawals? Yes.Now, these sharp responses could have been elicited by our line of questioning, or maybe we were just hitting the right notes for Trustly heading into next week’s Betting on Sports.In any case, Tucker proceeded to deliver some must-read insight into the influence of Pay N Play and where the company’s flagship product is seeing the biggest uptake, as well as some of the more surprising findings from last month’s fast payments research.SBC: Do you think the value of payments has been overlooked by the gambling industry?Nicholas Tucker: No! Personally, I think that successful gaming operators have always viewed payments as a core pillar of the success of their operations. The last thing you want is to lose the player at the first hurdle when they try to make a deposit or create a bad wagering experience by making it hard to access winnings. As a whole, we see much more expertise and innovation in payments within the gaming vertical compared to some others we work in. Essentially, for an operator to be successful, it needs to make payments as easy and frictionless as possible for the consumer. When you look at the cashier of a gaming operator vs an e-commerce or travel merchant, you will see far more payment options. I think this reflects the level of value and dedication placed on making payments possible for the player.SBC: Has the slowing of the ‘race to the bottom’ approach to player retention opened the door for payment-based innovations to take centre stage?NT: Definitely. We were seeing fierce competition between operators all trying to attract and retain players by offering huge bonuses (with hidden and confusing wagering requirements) but without much regard for what players wanted in terms of experience. Also, regulators are beginning to step in by simplifying or restricting the size and frequency of player bonuses, hampering this model of acquisition and retention. Through our Pay N Play product, we have helped operators switch the focus to player experience by offering a simplified registration and deposit process and improving the speed that winnings reach the player’s bank account. I think increasingly we will see payment, game and affiliate suppliers working closely with the operator to enhance the player experience rather than simply offering them a bonus to play more. The operators with the best player experience and strongest brand recognition (based on values players respect) will come out on top. This is what we have started to see in the Swedish market since regulation.SBC: Part of the research summary was that operators are worried about losing revenues when in fact instant withdrawals represent a revenue growth opportunity; was dispelling these concerns one of your biggest commercial challenges?NT: Yes! I have had conversations with some of the largest sports betting brands that indicate a very significant proportion of their revenue comes from cancelled withdrawals. It requires a big change in mindset to adopt a new approach, especially when some stakeholders within the business are worried about the impact on the balance sheet. However, once one operator in a market offers instant withdrawals (and it embraces the revenue growth opportunity), others soon follow as players begin to expect the functionality as a hygiene factor when considering which brands they play with.SBC: What were the surprise findings from the research?NT: Contrary to the belief of some of the more traditional operators, we have found that players increasingly prioritise the speed and access to winnings as a key driver of loyalty towards a brand. This is especially prevalent among VIP players. Out of the 1,700 players across nine countries that we interviewed during the research, we found that 94% want instant access to their winnings. Given the high cost of acquiring new players, it is more important than ever to keep active players happy by catering to their needs over the long term, such as instant withdrawals. Interestingly, 80% of players said they would gamble more if they were offered instant withdrawals by the operator. Another interesting find was that more people remember their bank login details versus their card details. Now that the ease of logging in and authenticating a bank payment is improving dramatically, supported by PSD2 and Open Banking, there is a genuine opportunity for direct bank payments to become the method of choice in markets where card schemes have previously dominated. This provides a platform for innovation around player registration, ID verification, source of funds and responsible gaming checks in markets like the UK.SBC: Finally, your Pay N Play product has quickly become an ‘industry standard’ in Sweden; in which other countries are you seeing the biggest pick-up?NT: We have seen fantastic growth in Finland and Estonia throughout 2019 and we are also seeing rapid adoption in Germany and recently the Netherlands. We expect the first brands to go live in Denmark by the end of the year and are hoping the product has a disruptive impact on this market, which has traditionally been card-focused.last_img read more

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Reports: Dave Roberts to be named LA Dodgers manager

first_imgDave Roberts will be the Dodgers’ next manager, according to multiple reports Sunday night.Roberts was the San Diego Padres’ first base coach from 2011-13 and their bench coach the last two seasons. He has never managed at any level.As an outfielder, Roberts starred at UCLA before playing 10 major league seasons for five different teams from 1999-2008. He broke through as an everyday player after being traded to the Dodgers prior to the 2002 season, then was traded to the Boston Red Sox in July 2004. His stolen base in Game 4 of that year’s American League Championship Series helped the Red Sox win the game and ultimately come back from a 3-0 deficit in the series.Roberts, whose father is African-American and mother is Japanese, would become the first minority manager in Dodgers history. Roberts can expect to face the same high expectations as Mattingly, himself a first-time manager when he succeeded Joe Torre in 2011. The Dodgers enjoyed five winning seasons in Mattingly’s five years, including National League West titles the last three.General manager Farhan Zaidi said last month that he expected the Dodgers to have a younger roster than the group that earned close to $300 million in 2015, a record.Among Roberts’ first tasks: hiring a coaching staff. Wallach is expected to join Mattingly as the bench coach in Miami. Roenicke has been hired as the Angels’ third base coach. Davey Lopes, who was the Dodgers’ first base coach the last five seasons, took the same job with the Washington Nationals. The team has yet to make an official announcement, and Roberts isn’t expected to be introduced Monday. According to several reports Sunday, his contract has yet to be finalized.The Dodgers parted ways with Don Mattingly on Oct. 22. The following week, Mattingly was named manager of the Miami Marlins.Nine candidates reportedly interviewed for the job over the last month: Roberts, farm director Gabe Kapler, third base coach Ron Roenicke, bench coach Tim Wallach, former Padres manager Bud Black, Mets bench coach Bob Geren, former Diamondbacks manager Kirk Gibson, Cubs bench coach Dave Martinez and University of Nebraska head coach Darin Erstad.Kapler was considered the early favorite for the job. Only he, Roberts and Black received second interviews. Neither Kapler nor Roberts have experience managing at the major league level, aside from one game in June that Roberts managed on an interim basis.The Dodgers have had nine managers since moving to Los Angeles in 1958 – seven since Tommy Lasorda’s final game in 1996. Roberts would become the 28th manager in the history of a franchise that began in Brooklyn in 1884.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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