Restart sets stage for Stanford’s late-race heroics at Pat Pettit Memorial

first_imgWATSONVILLE, Calif. (Oct. 2-3) – A restart with two laps left set the stage for Alex Stanford’s late-race heroics Saturday at Ocean Speedway.Stanford drove by Friday winner Bobby Hogge IV to capture the $3,003 Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified checkers on night two of the Pat Pettit Memorial.A spot on the ballot for the 2016 Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational accompanied the big check.Stanford led the first four laps from the pole before Hogge came from second row start to take lead. Passing continued through mid-pack and the light stayed green until fourth running Andy Obertello brought out the caution with a couple laps to go.Stanford outgunned Hogge for the lead on the restart and paced the pack for the win ahead of Hogge, Ryan Porter, Kellen Chadwick and Paul Stone.Chadwick had drawn the Friday pole spot and took the immediate lead over Brian Cass and Hogge. He led the first 16 laps before Hogge led a pair. Chadwick was scored first again on lap 19 before Hogge took over for good.That win paid $2,003; Hogge was already an All-Star Invitational candidate.Friday night Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod victor Rick Diaz led the first nine laps of the Satur­day feature from the pole with fifth starting Nick Spainhoward quickly into second. A lap 10 restart saw Spainhoward grab the lead for the next 10 laps.A quick yellow for a slowing car changed the whole complexion of the event as multiple contacts between the top duo resulting in Spainhoward going to the rear for causing the yellow.The final pair of laps saw Diaz leading challenger Cale Kanke on the restart. Lurking in third was Fred Ryland who returned from a heat race crash to start 20th. Leading only the final lap, Ryland grabbed the $1,003 top prize to win over Diaz, Kanke and Matthew Hagio.Diaz paced the field after Wayne Dotson’s flip red-flagged the Friday feature. He took the $503 win ahead of Jeremy Hoff, Spainhoward and Ryland.Oct. 2 Feature ResultsModifieds – 1. Bobby Hogge IV; 2. Kellen Chadwick; 3. Brian Cass; 4. Jim Pettit II; 5. Andy Ober­tello; 6. Paul Stone; 7. Alex Stanford; 8. Ryan McDaniel; 9. Brad Pounds; 10. Darrell Hughes II; 11. Tim Balding; 12. Nick DeCarlo; 13. Kyle Wilson; 14. Troy Foulger; 15. James Alaga; 16. Randy McDaniel; 17. Aaron Crowell; 18. Jeff Decker; 19. Ethan Dotson; 20. Jimmy Reeves; 21. Stephen Hopf; 22. Cody Burke.Northern SportMods – 1. Rick Diaz; 2. Jeremy Hoff; 3. Nick Spainhoward; 4. Fred Ryland; 5. Mike Drake; 6. Mark Odgers; 7. Chris Falkenberg; 8. Cale Kanke; 9. Anthony Giuliani; 10. Trevor Clymens; 11. Nick Tucker; 12. Shawn Bryant; 13. Matthew Hagio; 14. Al Sotomayor; 15. Jack Hurley; 16. Josh Hensley; 17. Dwayne Short; 18. Wayne Dotson; 19. Al JohnsonOct. 3 Feature ResultsModifieds – 1. Stanford; 2. Hogge; 3. Ryan Porter; 4. Chadwick; 5. Stone; 6. Ryan McDaniel; 7. Balding; 8. Cody Burke; 9. Pounds; 10. Decker; 11. Foulger; 12. Hughes; 13. Kyle Wilson; 14. Alex Wilson; 15. Randy McDaniel; 16. Todd Hermosillo; 17. Austin Burke; 18. Kenny Nott; 19. Crowell; 20. Obertello; 21. Pettit; 22. Cass; 23. Salazar.Northern SportMods – 1. Ryland; 2. Diaz; 3. Kanke; 4. Hagio; 5. Odgers; 6. Paul Espino; 7. Clymens; 8. Drake; 9. Steve Stone; 10. Falkenberg; 11. Giuliani; 12. Tucker; 13. Hensley; 14. Sotomayor; 15. Spainhoward; 16. Tim Elias; 17. Darren Thomas; 18. Hoff; 19. Hurley; 20. Short; 21. Johnson; 22. Bryant.last_img read more

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USC ready to kick off MPSF tournament

first_imgFollowing an impressive regular season capped by wins in 15 of its last 16 games, the No. 1 USC men’s volleyball team is poised to make a run in this weekend’s Mountain Pacific Sports Federation tournament.King of Troy · Senior opposite Murphy Troy, who was named MPSF Player of the Year on Thursday, has played a significant role in USC’s 21-win regular season. The Trojans begin postseason play Saturday against crosstown rival UCLA at Galen Center. – Tim Tran | Daily Trojan First in line for the Trojans (21-2, 20-2) is No. 8 UCLA, which USC easily disposed of in straight sets during last week’s MPSF regular season match.“We’re peaking at the right time,” said USC coach Bill Ferguson. “The guys playing as well as they did last week with nothing on the line shows that we’re in a good place.”During the regular season, USC won 13 of its 23 matches in straight sets. It has faced — and conquered — a full battery of tests — dropping large leads, making large comebacks and steadily dominating en route to victory. USC’s only losses came in two five-set thrillers.The Trojans have also been statistically dominant, leading the league in hitting percentage (.355), opponent’s hitting percentage (.249), kills (14.06 per game), assists (13.18 per game) and digs (9.93 per game).USC won its first MPSF regular season title in 2000. The Trojans have also won their last four matches against UCLA and seven of the last eight.Senior opposite Murphy Troy has been named MPSF player of the week three times, and junior outside hitter Tony Ciarelli earned the honor twice, as well.On the other hand, UCLA (16-14, 9-13) has been inconsistent thus far. Although it has beaten the likes of No. 3 UC Irvine, it has also dropped matches to the likes of unranked UC San Diego.During the last USC-UCLA meeting, Bruins coach Al Scates pulled starting middle blocker Weston Dunlap and starting opposite Kyle Caldwell after an inconsistent match from the two.“Al’s trying to find a lineup that’ll work,” Ferguson said. “I anticipate that he’ll have a set lineup and give the guys a longer leash.”Last year, the Trojans dropped the first round match of the MPSF tournament to Cal State Northridge. The Trojans’ experience, skill and all-around cohesion has them primed to avoid a repeat upset this time, however.“The guys have really bought into the ‘one day, one practice a time’ type of work ethic,” Ferguson said. “There’s no anxiety now. It’s all about us. If we give a good effort and play our game, we’ll be fine.”First serve is at 7 p.m. at Galen Center on Saturday.last_img read more

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Strict implementation of drug master plan needed to eradicate drug trafficking – NANA Director

first_img– says community, civil society must also get involvedWith Guyana considered a drug transhipment point in South America, only the strict implementation of the Drug Strategy Master Plan will suffice to eradicate the scourge of drug abuse and trafficking in Guyana.NANA Director, Major General (ret’d) Michael Atherly, at the opening of the drug treatment courtThis was emphasised by Director of the National Anti-Narcotics Agency (NANA), retired Major General Michael Atherly during the opening of Guyana’s first specialised drug rehabilitation court. According to Atherly, many factors, including those outside of Guyana, can help to explain Guyana’s drug problem.“National considerations also take into account several international deliberations, including treaties, strategies and best practices. Guyana is located within the hub of the transhipment routes for cocaine-producing countries in South and Central America to the North American and European markets.”“Drug cartels operating there seem to feel that profits gained from these markets overshadow the risks associated with production and trafficking. Accordingly, Guyana is not spared the distressing consequences of this problem. The drug problem must, therefore, be countered relentlessly.”NANA headquartersAtherly emphasised the need for all stakeholders, including communities, civil society, and the Private Sector, to be involved in eradicating the drug scourge. In addition, he cited the master plan, which the Government launched back in 2016.“The National Anti-Narcotics Agency believes that strong anti-narcotic efforts and demand reduction measures can and must go hand in hand with policies focused on rehabilitation and reintegration of drug users into society, in full respect for human rights, fundamental freedoms and human dignity.”“I would like to take this opportunity to reemphasise the need for vigorous implementation of the National Drug Strategy Master Plan. This plan is aimed at guiding and monitoring the actions of Government departments and their stakeholders, to reduce the demand for and supply of drugs, as well as the resulting harm from their abuse.”Earlier this year, a United States (US) State Department report had declared that while Guyana has a comprehensive drug demand reduction strategy, the use of drugs like marijuana and even cocaine is a growing problem.This information is contained in the 2019 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report, which has a section dedicated to Guyana’s profile. Notwithstanding the trafficking, the report noted that the actual consumption of these drugs is a growing problem.According to the report, marijuana is the most commonly used drug. The document also noted reported seizures of synthetic drugs like Methylene-dioxyamphetamine (MDMA), most commonly known as “ecstasy”, and detailed Government’s response to the scourge.“The Government of Guyana’s National Drug Abuse Control Unit trains public health officers, teachers, social workers, and civil society groups as part of the Government’s supply reduction strategy,” the report states.“The Guyanese Government has a drug enforcement presence at its international airports, post offices, and to a lesser extent at seaport and land-border entry points. Control agencies reported several interdiction efforts and drug-related seizures and convictions during the first nine months of 2018”, the report details.The report also noted that during the first nine months of 2018, authorities seized 164.9 kilograms of cocaine and 889 kilograms of cannabis. It also states that local authorities initiated 358 prosecutions and convicted 24 individuals for drug trafficking.The report expressed faith in Guyana’s demand reduction strategy, noting that it adequately addresses drug rehabilitation. It named the Ministry of Public Health, Ministry of Education, and Ministry of Social Protection as the relevant Ministries responsible for addressing demand reduction.“Non-governmental organisations also offer rehabilitation services, with the Government providing financial assistance. The Georgetown Public Hospital provides free rehabilitation services for drug users. The University of Guyana has a demand reduction curriculum in place through OAS/CICAD funding.”“The Government of Guyana conducts anti-drug awareness sessions in secondary schools, and has plans to create drug treatment courts. As part of the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI), the United States supports Guyana through targeted training for law enforcement and maritime officers,” the report had declared.Being positioned on the South American continent with strong ties to the Caribbean region, Guyana has long been identified as a transhipment point for drug trafficking activities. It was against this backdrop that the US established an office of its Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) here back in February 2016.last_img read more

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