FRSB denies financial crisis

first_imgFRSB denies financial crisis Tagged with: Fundraising Standards Board Law / policy Howard Lake | 14 July 2008 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Fundraising Standards Board and Institute of Fundraising have issued a joint statement to deny that the Board is in financial difficulties.Colin Lloyd, Chair of the Fundraising Standards Board and Paul Amadi, Chair of the Institute of Fundraising said: “In response to accusations from the third sector press that the Fundraising Standards Board is facing financial crisis, we categorically deny that this is the case. The Fundraising Standards Board is not in financial crisis. Funding is in place for the next financial year and beyond. The financial sustainability of the FRSB is not in question”.They pointed to the Board’s success in securing 900 member charities, representing 35% of all money given by the public to charities, adding that both “the Government and Scottish Government are pleased with progress”.Amadi and Lloyd added: “A year on since public launch, planning for the next phase of the development of the Fundraising Standards Board in the context of a self-regulatory environment is at the forefront of our minds.“Options being considered include broadening the remit of the Fundraising Standards Board to capture and act on complaints from organisations that are not in its membership, more equitable fees structures and more support for charities to further their best practice through the implementation of the Codes of Fundraising Practice.”www.frsb.org.uk  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Jay Williams Says Kentucky Got “Hosed” When It Comes To Seeding

first_imgUNC cheerleader walks through College GameDay live-shot.Jay Williams DukeAfter splitting the regular season title in the SEC, Kentucky and Texas A&M both reached the league’s tournament final – setting up what seemed like an all-important showdown regarding NCAA Tournament seeding. Well, that’s what we thought.The Wildcats knocked off the Aggies Sunday, taking home the trophy. But somehow, when the brackets were unveiled just hours later, Texas A&M was given a 3-seed, while UK landed on the 4-line. John Calipari, per usual, went off. It turns out some of the ESPN guys agree with him.College basketball analyst Jay Williams went as far as to say that Kentucky got “hosed” by the committee. . @KentuckyMBB got hosed. No way #BBN wins their conf tourney & share of the regular season & get a 4 seed while Texas A&M gets a 3 seed.— Jay Williams (@RealJayWilliams) March 13, 2016It’s hard to disagree here. Most thought that at worst, Kentucky would get a 3-seed, and at best, a 2-seed. The NCAA Tournament selection committee continues to baffle everyone, year after year.last_img read more

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Laura Dern Raises Awareness Of Lung Cancer At Academy Awards

first_imgThe American Lung Association’s LUNG FORCE initiative congratulates Academy Award nominee Laura Dern for her acclaimed performance in the movie adaption of Cheryl Strayed’s 2012 memoir “Wild,” in which she portrays Strayed’s mother, Bobbi Lambrecht, who died of lung cancer only seven weeks after being diagnosed.Laura Dern continues the Oscars celebration by slipping into a turquoise Badgley Mischka dress for the Vanity Fair After-PartyCredit/Copyright: Mike Windle/Getty ImagesTo help elevate awareness of the American Lung Association’s LUNG FORCE initiative, Dern and Strayed debuted statement jewelry featuring LUNG FORCE’s signature color, turquoise, on the red carpet and later, Dern donned a turquoise Badgley Mischka dress at the exclusive Vanity Fair After-Party.“When I first got involved in the project, I was so moved by Cheryl and her mother’s story,” Dern said. “And after researching the role, I was shocked to learn that lung cancer is the number one cancer killer of women, but only one percent of women say lung cancer is even on their radar. That’s why I’m asking all women to unite and share their voices to fight this deadly disease. Go to LUNGFORCE.org to see how you can get involved.”Strayed added, “I know very personally how lung cancer affects women – no one should have to lose their mother the way I did. That’s why I feel an obligation to help unite all women so we can – one day – defeat this disease.”LUNG FORCE, which is nationally presented by CVS Health, works to make lung cancer in women a public health priority, drive policy change and increase research funding. In 1987, lung cancer surpassed breast cancer as the leading cancer killer of women, and is projected to kill more than 71,000 American women in 2015, accounting for about 26 percent of all female cancer deaths.“Cheryl’s very moving story embodied by Laura’s breakthrough performance in ‘Wild’ is a powerful reminder of the need to fight this deadly disease,” said Harold Wimmer, National President and Chief Executive Officer of the American Lung Association. “Through this, we aim to continue to raise awareness of lung cancer and, ultimately, defeat lung cancer. The time for change is now.”Visit LUNGFORCE.org to learn more, or join the conversation on Facebook at Facebook.com/LUNGFORCE or on Twitter at Twitter.com/LUNGFORCE.last_img read more

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NEB sets out dispute resolution process for Trans Mountain permits

first_imgCALGARY – The National Energy Board is setting up a process to resolve future permitting issues between Kinder Morgan Canada Ltd. and provincial and municipal authorities on the Trans Mountain expansion project.The NEB said Thursday that under the process, it will take about three to five weeks to reach a decision on future permitting disputes.The regulator said that it still expects all sides to go through the permitting process in good faith, but the board will step in when necessary on permitting issues that affect NEB conditions on the project.“This generic process will provide a measure of certainty regarding the regulatory tools available to resolve permitting disputes or disagreements in limited circumstances where Trans Mountain and provincial and municipal authorities are unable to do so,” the NEB said in a release.Kinder Morgan Canada (TSX:KML) had asked for a way to resolve future disputes after encountering what it called significant delays on securing permits from Burnaby, B.C.B.C. municipalities had made submissions against the proposal, with Chilliwack expressing concern that the company may use it as a pressure mechanism or as leverage against the city. Surrey said the motion is an attempt to unlawfully fetter, circumvent, and undermine the legislative scheme to the detriment of municipalities.Outside supporters of the Trans Mountain project, including the Alberta and federal governments, supported the proposal as a way to address compliance oversight.The NEB said it expects the process to be rarely used, and it would only step in for limited reasons such as when there’s lack of clarity as to whether Trans Mountain has achieved condition compliance.Kinder Morgan Canada had asked that a standing panel be set up to hear the potential disputes, but the NEB said it would decide who would hear issues as they arise. The NEB also gave itself roughly double the time the company had requested for decisions to be made in the process.The company said Wednesday that it estimated the Trans Mountain expansion project was a year behind schedule after encountering regulatory and permitting delays.The project, which would nearly triple oil-shipping capacity from Alberta to the West Coast, faces significant opposition from numerous Indigenous groups, environmentalists and municipalities in British Columbia.last_img read more

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Laos dam disaster leaves 24 dead scores missing

first_imgATTAPEU, Laos – Rescuers searched Wednesday for scores of villagers left missing when part of a newly built hydroelectric dam broke in southeastern Laos, flooding the surrounding countryside and killing at least 24 people, officials said.Thousands of people lost their homes when the South Korean-built dam gave way on Monday, flooding surrounding villages.Hundreds took shelter in nearby towns, travelling by bus and pickup trucks and sleeping on plastic sheeting.“The water came so quick we just left the house and ran away,” said Phon Vuongchonpu, whose family of 12 fled as the floodwater rose to roof level. “We’ve lost everything: motorbike, furniture our cows and pigs.”Bounyong Phommachak, a Red Cross official, said 24 bodies had been recovered and 96 people were officially listed as missing. He said by phone that about 6,600 people had been displaced from their homes.China’s state news agency, Xinhua, which maintains one of the very few foreign news bureaus in Laos, reported that Lao Prime Minister Thongloun Sisoulith said at a news conference that 131 people were missing and the homeless totalled 3,060. He did not give a death toll.The discrepancies in the tolls could be due to difficult communications and heavy rains in the area which have hampered rescue efforts.Photos and videos posted on social media showed people sitting on rooftops to escape the surging water, while others were carried to safety or rescued by boat.One of five auxiliary earth-fill dams at the project began visibly weakening on Friday, said Korea Western Power, one of two South Korean partners in the hydroelectric project.SK Engineering & Construction, the other Korean joint venture partner, said the top of the dam was swept away Sunday as workers were struggling to control the damage amid heavy rain. The situation worsened on Monday as water cascaded out of the reservoir, flooding seven out of 12 villages in the area, SK E&C said. It was helping to evacuate and rescue residents and sent its president and a team of 30 people to the disaster zone.Continued heavy rain and strong winds forecast for the area could hinder rescue efforts, and risks from flooding persisted in the mountainous region. A report by the intergovernmental Mekong River Commission said storms had caused water levels along the river to rise by 3-5 metres (9-15 feet) in the past week.Provincial authorities issued a call for emergency aid, and residents in Paksong were streaming to the evacuation shelter bringing food, as doctors attended to those needing help.“I feel safe here, but worry for my husband and son who are still in the village,” said Tem Namsakhunpiraded, who escaped the floodwaters with three of her children and a 6-month-old grandchild.The International Red Cross said food was a concern because village food supplies were drenched in the flooding. It was arranging for water purification units to be sent to the area to ensure supplies of clean drinking water.The presidential office in South Korea said President Moon Jae-in had ordered an emergency relief team to help with the disaster.The $1.02 billion project encompassing several river basins in a remote corner of southeastern Laos is the first hydroelectric dam to be built by a South Korean company, and it was unclear how severe the damage would be to the overall plan. The dam was due to begin operating in 2019, with 90 per cent of the power generated going to Thailand.Shares of companies affiliated with SK E&C sank on Wednesday on concerns over potential costs for compensation and other financial setbacks from the disaster.Laos has dozens of hydroelectric projects under construction and plans for sales of power to neighbouring countries, now accounting for about a third of its exports, to grow substantially.But dam building along the Mekong River and its tributaries, including those affected by this disaster, has raised concerns over environmental impact and other problems.International Rivers, a nongovernmental group generally critical of such projects, said the catastrophe showed the need to improve warning systems.“With over 70 hydropower projects currently built, under construction and planned across Lao PDR — most of them owned and operated by private companies — authorities must immediately review how dams are being planned, designed and managed,” the group said in a statement.___Associated Press writers Tong-hyung Kim and Youkyung Lee in Seoul, South Korea, contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Pompeo hopes India will not buy oil from Venezuelas Maduro govt

first_imgWashington DC: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Monday hoped that India will not be the “economic lifeline” to the “authoritarian” regime of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro by purchasing oil from the Latin American country. Pompep’s comments came as Washington ramps up actions on Maduro’s regime, which is battling to hold onto power in the face of heavy domestic and international pressure. Venezuela is the third largest supplier of oil to India which is the world’s third-biggest oil consumer. Also Read – Maruti cuts production for 8th straight month in SepThe issue was discussed in a meeting with the visiting Indian Foreign Secretary Vijay Gokhale, Pompeo told reporters at a news conference here, without providing insight into it. “We are asking the same thing of India as we are of every country: Do not be the economic lifeline for the Maduro regime. So we talked about (Venezuela) I certainly won’t characterise the conversations; they’re private conversations,” Pompeo said in response to a question. Also Read – Ensure strict implementation on ban of import of e-cigarettes: revenue to Customs”In the same way that India has been incredibly supportive of our efforts in Iran, I’m confident that they too understand the real threat to the Venezuelan people. We had a good conversation around that,” Pompeo said. The Latin American country’s Oil Minister and state-run oil company PDVSA’s President Manuel Quevedo told reporters in Greater Noida in Uttar Pradesh last month that his sanctions-hit country wants to sell more crude oil to India. The US has slapped sweeping sanctions on PDVSA with a view to curb Venezuela’s crude exports and put pressure on socialist President Maduro to step down. Venezuela produces around 1.57 million barrels of oil per day, half of what it produced two decades back. With the US stopping imports from Venezuela, PDVSA is seeking to retain buyers in other big consuming countries such as China and India. At the news conference, Pompeo said the nations that support Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro are, by the nature of this “illegitimate” regime, carrying out the very foreign interventionism of which they accuse others. “Today, the United States is drawing a clear line between those who aid the forces of repression and those who give life to the Venezuelan people’s democratic dreams. There is no ambiguity here about the truth,” he said. Similar kind of warning to other nations was issued by US National Security Adviser John Bolton. “The United States will not stand idly by while foreign financial institutions facilitate illegitimate transactions that benefit Maduro and his cronies, and perpetuate the corruption that has devastated Venezuela,” he said. Earlier in the day, the Treasury sanctioned a Russia-based bank attempting to circumvent US sanctions on Venezuela’s state-owned oil company PDVSA. It sanctioned Evrofinance Mosnarbank, a Moscow-based bank jointly owned by Russia and Venezuela, for being involved in facilitating illegitimate transactions that prolong Maduro’s usurpation of democracy, it said. “The illegitimate Maduro regime has profited off of the suffering of the Venezuelan people,” said US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.last_img read more

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John Kerry Visits Largest Mosque in South East Asia

first_imgJakarta- US Secretary of State John Kerry visited Asia’s largest mosque in Jakarta on Sunday during his visit to Indonesia, paying tribute to Islam in the world’s most populous Muslim-majority nation.According to AFP, after the top US diplomat removed his shoes outside the Istiqlal mosque in the heart of Jakarta, he took a 20-minute tour through the vast building and was accompanied by grand imam Kyai al-Hajj Ali Mustafa Yaqub.The same source explained that the Obama administration is attempting to repair the frayed relations between the United States and Muslims around the globe since the 2003 Iraq invasion. “We are all connected to the same God and the same faith. Abraham connects us all in the love of our neighbor and the honor of the same God. May peace be upon you,” John Kerry wrote in the guest book of the mosque.Indonesia, the world’s third largest democracy, has often been considered the “bridge” between the West and the Muslim world.  Ninety percent of Indonesia’s 250 million people identify themselves as Muslims, and most of them practice a moderate form of Islam.US president Barack Obama, who spent part of his childhood in Jakarta, also visited the mosque in 2010 when he travelled to the country.The Istiqlal Mosque, commissioned in 1961, lies in the heart of Jakarta. It serves as a reminder of Indonesia’s struggle for national independence and hosts over 130,000 prayers during Ramadan.With agencieslast_img read more

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Do MLB Teams Undervalue Defense — Or Just Value It Differently

Absent a helpful general manager opening up his computer system — or letting you hack in, if that’s more your style — it’s tough to know what baseball teams think of different players. But one place GMs leave clues about their preferences is in free agency. Since each team can bid on every available player, and the competition to acquire the most valuable talent is fierce, the free-agent sweepstakes is baseball’s closest answer to an open market; accordingly, the cash that teams deal out tells us how much they’re willing to pay for each area of on-field expertise. And for all the strides made in evaluating defense (plus convincing clubs to buy in), my analysis of recent offseasons suggests that MLB teams still don’t value defense the same way as sabermetricians do — though it might not be because they don’t value it enough.To estimate how much teams pay for offense relative to defense, I looked at the average annual value of every non-catcher1I removed them from the sample because their value has been affected by the quantification of pitch-framing (more on that later). position-player contract signed since the 2006 offseason2According to salary data from ESPN. and compared those dollar figures to players’ offensive and defensive runs above average (according to FanGraphs.com) in the previous three years.3I used a linear regression over that time period, three seasons being a reasonable sample upon which a player can be judged. I found that, from the front-office perspective, a run saved just isn’t worth as much as a run scored.For every offensive run a player generated above average in the season before he inked a new deal, he was paid an extra $215,000. An offensive run two years back was worth $113,000, and there was even value — $93,000 per run — in stats from three years in the past. By contrast, each defensive run was worth only $84,000 one year back, with the benefit even lower in earlier years.4Specifically, the value per defensive run dropped to $29,000 two years back and $69,000 three years back. (The higher value for the latter is likely just statistical noise.)As far as teams are concerned, then, offense is what drives a player’s value, with defense a secondary priority. That’s not to say that front offices ignore fielding entirely when signing players, but they do appear to take defensive statistics with a grain of salt.One potential reason is obvious: Teams may be late to understanding the value of good defense. Mitchel Lichtman, the sabermetrician who created the defensive metric Ultimate Zone Rating, told me in an email that “it will probably be a long time before teams fully appreciate the proper mathematical role of defense in evaluating players and making transactions.”Of course, analytics experts have been arguing that teams undervalue defense since the days of Moneyball. And in the years since, sabermetrics has gone mainstream. Teams now employ huge research and development departments — many staffed directly from the ranks of baseball writers who used to criticize teams for undervaluing defense. So it seems unlikely that those analysts forgot about glovework when they walked through the front-office doors.Moreover, teams have shown that they can rapidly adjust to new information about player value when it emerges. For instance, pitch-framing skills — wherein a catcher boosts the chance that a pitch will be called a strike — weren’t quantified until about 2009. Before that offseason, there was no significant relationship between a catcher’s framing ability and the average annual value of his free-agent contract;5The correlation coefficient was 0.16, with a p-value of 0.31. afterward, the correlation spiked.6It rose to 0.33, which is significant with a p-value of 0.006. In other words, teams quickly learned about framing skill and calibrated their contract offers to adjust for it.So another potential explanation for the seeming disconnect between defense and dollars is that teams do properly quantify defense, but in a different way than our publicly available metrics. In other words, if we replaced the public metrics in my previous analysis with proprietary ones cooked up by front offices, there’s a possibility that the inconsistency between defensive performance and pay would disappear.I spoke with a handful of former and current front-office analysts about how teams value defensive metrics, none of whom would speak on the record. They mentioned that some teams have proprietary systems to measure the value of defense, sometimes adding input from scouts or other non-public data sources. If even a handful of teams have systems that produce substantially different fielding valuations than the public statistics, it could appear as though they are disregarding defense — when, in fact, they’re measuring it better than we know.At a minimum, teams have access to much better data with which to construct defensive metrics than the public. With the advent of Statcast, MLB’s radar-based tracking system, team analysts can quantify the location and movement of every player on the field. Statcast also provides raw data on the running speed and reaction times of fielders, allowing front offices to break defense down into its individual components.MLB is providing only a fraction of that data to the public. But if we’ve learned anything from early attempts to model fielding using Statcast — such as Catch Probability, which measures the likelihood that any given batted ball will be caught — it’s that new fielding metrics can disagree significantly with conventional ones.Depending on the analysis being run,7Whether you limit the comparison by sample size (i.e., the number of opportunities) or by position. Statcast-based Catch Probabilities correlate with Ultimate Zone Rating either moderately (r=.47) or strongly (r=.71). Some have taken the latter as confirmation that UZR was correct all along. But consider as well that the correlation between batting average and on-base percentage is also 0.71.8For qualified hitters in the 2016 season. The realization that OBP was a better hitting metric than batting average, you may recall, formed one of the cornerstones of the Moneyball revolution.Similarly, if Statcast-fueled metrics represent as much of an upgrade on public defensive stats as OBP was on batting average, it’s no wonder that teams don’t seem to value defense. Those clubs might just be so far beyond currently available fielding statistics that sabermetricians can no longer criticize them.It’s likely that not every team has its own defensive metric, and some teams’ metrics are probably no better than the public’s. But occasionally, it’s obvious that a team is onto something we don’t know about. Take the case of outfielder Dexter Fowler: Before he joined the Cubs for the 2015 season, writers raised questions about his defense based on poor public metrics; that year, he ended up earning 3.3 wins above replacement, fueled largely by a 20-run improvement in his UZR. Then in 2016, after more skepticism about Fowler’s fielding, he put up the best defensive numbers of his career to date. That, in turn, led to his signing by the St. Louis Cardinals this past offseason for the staggering total of $82.5 million over five years, questionable defense be damned.Whether because of Statcast or scouting, the Cubs and now the Cardinals have seen something in Fowler’s performance that current fielding valuations don’t seem to capture. And when two of the smartest front offices in baseball appear to be discarding defensive metrics, it makes you stop and wonder whether the metrics might just be wrong. read more

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Scouting Minnesota A look at the 2015 Golden Gophers

OSU then-sophomore defensive lineman Joey Bosa (97) runs after Minnesota then-redshirt sophomore quarterback Mitch Leidner (7) during a game on Nov. 15 game in Minneapolis. OSU won 31-24. Credit: Lantern file photoAfter its lone bye week of the season, No. 3 Ohio State is set to welcome the Minnesota Golden Gophers to Ohio Stadium on Saturday.It will do so with a familiar face back behind center in redshirt junior Cardale Jones, who will start for the suspended J.T. Barrett.For Minnesota, it moseys into Columbus after a head-scratching 29-26 loss to then-No. 15 Michigan on Halloween.What would have been the go-ahead touchdown from Minnesota’s redshirt junior quarterback Mitch Leidner with 19 seconds left was overturned on review. That was followed by poor clock management on the ensuing play, before a questionable decision to bypass attempting a 19-yard field goal to tie the game, instead opting for an unsuccessful one-yard quarterback sneak as time expired.The bizarre loss is just another installment in a rather disappointing campaign for Minnesota, which many thought would compete for the Big Ten West division crown, as it dropped to 4-4 on the year and 1-3 in the Big Ten.Here is deeper look at the 2015 Golden Gophers.Emotional pushLast week, Jerry Kill announced that he would be retiring from coaching because of health concerns. The exit of Kill, who was in the midst of his fourth season at the helm in Minneapolis, seemingly provided the double-digit underdog Golden Gophers with an emotional boost against then-No. 15 Michigan.“Coach Kill is so important to the state of Minnesota,” Leidner said following the loss. “The whole game was just emotional … For all the work every single person on that sideline put in to play for (Kill), it’s just an overwhelming feeling.”Leidner threw for a season-high 317 passing yards, sophomore tight end Brandon Lingen had more receiving yards (111) than he had in the first seven games combined and the offense as a whole piled up 461 yards — the second most this season — against the nation’s top-ranked defense.The Golden Gophers, who at one point had three straight three-point wins over measly opponents Colorado State, Kent State and Ohio, arguably looked the best they had all season against the Wolverines.Sometimes things that happen outside of the X’s and O’s, like Kill’s retirement, can have unexplainable effects once the game kicks off.One game is much too small of a sample size to know for sure if the emotional boost will be sustained, but against Michigan, Minnesota looked like the team many expected them to be early in the season.This week, against the nation’s No. 3 team in primetime with Kill’s exit still fresh in their minds, the Golden Gophers should be up to the challenge against OSU.Carrying the weightEmotions aside, there is a reason why Minnesota sits at .500 on the season.It’s because the Golden Gopher offense is — at best — marginal, and the defense has to carry much of the weight.Other than its 41-13 victory over Purdue (2-6), Minnesota has not scored more than 27 points in a game, which it did over the Mid-American Conference’s Ohio.Much of the reason why the Golden Gophers are ranked 107th in scoring offense is because of their inability to find the end zone. On the year, they have just 18 touchdowns compared to 14 field goals. To put it in perspective, one of the Big Ten’s worst teams in Purdue has 30 touchdowns and only three field goals.Those offensive struggles mean much more pressure is applied to the Minnesota defense.For the most part, the defense has not cracked under that pressure, as it’s been rather disruptive for opponents.Anchored by redshirt sophomore linebacker Cody Poock and senior cornerback Antonio Johnson, who both have 55 tackles on the season, the defense ranks 25th in the country.The veteran secondary, which starts three seniors, has been stingy all season long, letting up just 174 yards per game.With the struggling Jones back at quarterback for the Buckeyes, Minnesota will hope to capitalize on its secondary’s success and limit the OSU offense.If the said scenario can happen, the pressure shifts to the offense to do its part and find the end zone. Unfortunately for the Golden Gophers, expecting the offense to improve against the stout Scarlet and Gray defense is a tall task.Teammate reunionsMinnesota’s roster is littered with connections to current Buckeyes, as three players played high school football with an OSU player and another — redshirt senior center Brian Bobek — once donned the scarlet and gray. Two others are Ohio natives.Johnson was a high school teammate of OSU redshirt sophomore defensive lineman Donovan Munger at Shaker Heights High School near Cleveland. Minnesota redshirt freshman wide receiver Isaiah Gentry, who has two catches for 36 yards this season, was high school teammates with OSU’s redshirt freshman defensive Sam Hubbard at Cincinnati’s Archbishop Moeller, where the duo won back-to-back state championships.Minnesota redshirt freshman Jared Weyler played alongside OSU sophomore Evan Lisle on the offensive line at Centerville High School near Dayton.Bobek, who now starts at center for Minnesota, will be returning to Columbus where he spent a season on the OSU football team in 2011, appearing in five games. The Inverness, Illinois, native transferred after his freshman campaign.Beyond the BuckeyesFollowing Saturday’s showdown, Minnesota has another undefeated team on the docket. The Golden Gophers are scheduled to take on the No. 10 Iowa Hawkeyes on Nov. 14 in Iowa City, Iowa. Kickoff is penciled in for 8 p.m. read more

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Clemence feels for Karius

first_imgRay Clemence knows that these two mistakes that Loris Karius made in the Champions League final will haunt him maybe forever and it will take time to overcome it and focus on new things.To be added, Clemence is not sure whether Karius will be able to continue at the club after a match like that and for sure, these errors will stay with him until the end of his career.The former Reds player spoke about Karius’ situation as he said, according to Goal:“It’s going to be difficult for him, that’s a certainty because wherever he goes away from home he’s going to be continually reminded of it.”divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“When you make two errors like that, it is difficult. He hasn’t done his place any good.”“I’ve been there myself and it’s a terrible situation. He’ll be the first to hold his hands up and know he’s made two horrendous errors at crucial times.”“They will stay with you for the rest of your life. People will remember them. It’s watched by hundreds of millions of people around the world. And it’s a final, it’s amplified.”last_img read more

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