SOCCER: ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUE

first_imgULSTER SENIOR LEAGUE  Fanad United and  Drumkeen United meet this afternoon to see who will meet Letterkenny Rovers in the Donegal News USL Cup Final in a few weeks. Letterkenny Rovers advanced to the final after a 3-2 away win over Kildrum Tigers on Saturday. Rovers goal scorers were Davitt Walsh, Chris Malseed and Garbhan Grant.  Just one game was played in the 4 Lanterns  Ulster Senior League this weekend, Swilly Rovers were comfortable 5-0 victors over Bonagee United- Marty McDaid and Laurance Toland amonst the goal scorere for Jason Gibson’s men. And two games were played in the DPD USL Division One- Bonagee United defeated Swilly Rovers 1-0 and Kildrum Tigers overcame Letterkenny Rovers by 3 goals to 0. FIXTURESunday 1st July Ko 2pm DONEGAL NEWS USL CUP SEMI FINALFanad United v Drumkeen United ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUEWednesday 4th JulyDerry City v Letterkenny RoversBuncranna Hearts v Fanad UnitedDrumkeen United v Cockhill Celtic Bonagee United v Kildrum Tigers  RESULTS,4 LANTERNS ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUEBonagee United 0-5 Swilly Rovers  DONEGAL NEWS LEAGUE CUP SEMI FINALKildrum Tigers 2-3 Leterkenny Rovers DPD DIVISION ONEBonagee United 1-0 Swilly RoversLeterkenny Rovers 0-3 Kildrum Tigers Photos below are from Bonagee United v Swilly Rovers gameSOCCER: ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUE was last modified: July 1st, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:SOCCER: ULSTER SENIOR LEAGUElast_img read more

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SA fan to break attendance record

first_imgThe Last Fan Standing, Thulani Ngcobo. Ngcobo is enjoying the world’s best football. (Images: Last Fan Standing) MEDIA CONTACTS • Maphamola Lebelo Media Liaison Officer MTN +27 83 212 9918 RELATED ARTICLES • Exciting start to World Cup • The vuvuzela: Bafana’s 12th man • Bafana frenzy grips the nation • SA buzzing with World Cup spirit • Bafana final squad announcedBongani NkosiAs the 2010 Fifa World Cup kicked off, one avid South African football fan began a record-breaking attempt to attend 38 out of 64 matches.The 29-year-old Thulani Ngcobo, from Soshanguve township, began his countrywide trip to stadiums in all nine host cities at Soweto’s Soccer City on 11 June, where hosts South Africa and Mexico faced off in the opening game.The staunch Kaizer Chiefs fan has an opportunity to watch 38 matches live, with all expenses paid, thanks to the MTN Last Fan Standing competition he won late 2009. Ngcobo, a supply chain practitioner at the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform, beat other fans in a 40-question multiple choice test to scoop the prize.He’s also set to break a Guinness World Record for the most Fifa World Cup matches attended by an individual. The current record is 20 matches, and Ngcobo is confident that he’ll smash it.“Standing a chance to break a world record is a dream come true,” he said. “This is something that I will be recognised for.” Local mobile services provider MTN confirmed in 2009 that Guinness World Records has endorsed Ngcobo’s attempt.Dedicated supporterNgcobo 2010, the sobriquet he’s picked up, watches at least two matches a day, shuttling from stadium to stadium. He had already been to five matches by the morning of 14 June, and was preparing for matches in Johannesburg and Cape Town.“Running from stadium to stadium is not an easy task. It needs passion for football,” he said.A taxing journey awaits him, with 17 000km across South Africa to cover. He has tickets for 28 group and four Round of 16 matches, two quarter finals, two semi finals, the third and fourth place playoff, and the final. By the end of the tournament he would have seen about 30 teams in action.Fatigue is of little concern to him. “I may feel tired at times, but when I’m inside the stadium watching a match I’m freshened up,” said Ngcobo.‘Ghana support awesome’He’s seen scintillating football played in his home country in the first three days of the tournament. He enjoyed the opening match, where Bafana Bafana drew 1-1 with Mexico. “It was fantastic to have seen that game on African soil.”But his best moment so far is Ghana’s 1-0 defeat of Serbia. The atmosphere in Pretoria was “great”, he said.  He was also amazed by the support the Ghanaian Black Stars received from South Africans and other Africans.“The support for Ghana was awesome,” said Ngcobo. “We were so happy that Ghana, an African team, had won. We celebrated all the way.”Ngcobo should not struggle to reach his goal. An ardent football fan, he usually attends at least four local premier league games every week, and follows his favourite team Kaizer Chiefs all over the country. He attended all Bafana group stage matches, the third place game and the final, at the 2009 Fifa Confederations Cup.Before winning the Last Fan Standing competition, Ngcobo had planned to buy tickets for 10 matches, which would have seen him spend more than R2 000. “I’m thankful to MTN,” he said.last_img read more

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Forensics can stop illegal trade of ivory

first_imgAt CITES CoP17 in Johannesburg, scientists and investigators showed how they were using forensics to fight illegal ivory trade and poaching of Africa’s elephants.African elephant numbers are plunging because of poaching. Scientists and investigators are using forensics to track and seize illegal ivory and stop criminals at the source.(Image: Shamin Chibba)Shamin ChibbaThe fight against elephant poaching and illegal ivory trade is getting a boost from scientists and international law enforcement, which are using forensics to stop criminals.Speaking at the CITES CoP17 World Wildlife Conference, which ran from 24 September to 5 October in Johannesburg, Sam Wasser, a researcher at the University of Washington’s Centre for Conservation Biology, said they had created a system that helped to seize ivory in the destination country and track it to the source of the killing.Wasser led a discussion on using forensics to combat illegal ivory trade at its source. Using DNA analysis, researchers and investigators have been able to locate the source and track major exports. “We extract DNA from ivory samples and compare them to some 26 genetic markers.”He said that by current estimates, the African elephant could become extinct in ten years’ time. There are currently 400 000 elephants remaining in the wild and up to 40 000 are being killed by poachers every year.Male elephant tusks weigh anything between 45kg and 80kg while female tusks are as heavy as 20kg. On the black market, 0.5kg of ivory can be sold for up to R21 000.Illegal ivory trade was one of the five biggest organised crime networks in the world and was linked to other contraband such as cocaine and heroin, said Wasser. Most contraband is not seized in the source country. And of the 600-million port entries a year, only 2% of ship containers were checked.“To attack the problem we need to know where the ivory is coming from, how big are the networks and how much ivory there is. To stop this, we need to track trade at its source and attack prior to export. We also need to focus law enforcement on major poaching hot spots.”Poachers were well informed, said Wasser. They needed to know the land, make connections with rangers, know the elephants’ movements. They were also savvy when it came to exporting ivory, hiding tusks in long grain white rice sacks from Pakistan, for example.The first step in sampling is to identify pairs of tusks, which can be a monumental task as in many cases, pairs are split in different shipments.In one particular seizure, more than half of the tusks did not have matching pairs. “Pairs (are separated) and get shipped to different locations within a short space of time.”However, this tells investigators that the two shipments are being shipped by the same person.Kingpin’s arrestIn July this year, Kenyan businessman Feisal Ali Mohammed was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment by a Mombasa law court after he was found guilty of illegal possession of ivory worth 44-million shillings (R6-million). He also received a fine of 20-million shillings (R2.7-million).According to The Guardian website, a warrant for his arrest was issued in 2014 after two tons of ivory were seized from a car yard in Mombasa. He evaded capture that time.But in October of the same year, Interpol issued a Red Notice identifying Ali as one of the world’s most wanted environmental crime fugitives. He was arrested in Dar es Salaam in Tanzania on Christmas Eve 2014 and was returned to Mombasa to face trial.Despite Ali’s capture, Wasser said there were other major ivory smugglers who were well connected with game rangers, port authorities and the like.Any seizure of more than half-a-ton is considered large. However, investigators regularly seize up to two tons at a time, with the largest being 4.6 tons in Singapore last May.Smaller seizures, of up to 300 kilograms, are also made at airports. In one of the more recent seizures, airport security complied with the traffickers. “We saw some footage from Tanzania whereby a security guard switched off the X-ray machine to let through Chinese travellers with ivory going to Switzerland. They were seized in Switzerland,” said Wasser.Poaching locationsAll of the African elephants killed are concentrated within a 300km radius of two regions: 22% in Gabon and Republic of Congo in West Africa, and 78% Tanzania and Kenya in East Africa.According to Thure Cerling, a senior scientist at IsoForensics, most of the elephants killed are younger than five years of age.IsoForensics is an isotope analysis service that has been assessing seized tusks to determine the age of the elephants and their original habitat. “Elephants would have been killed a year before tusks are seized,” said Cerling.He uses samples taken from the cementum, or the outside of the tusk, which is richer in DNA material.Database links seizuresResearchers and investigators are relying on a database created by nonprofit research organisation C4ADS to track shipments – using an app called Windward – and seizures.According to Mary Utermohlen, an analyst at C4ADS, the organisation’s ivory seizure database has more than 1 100 ivory seizures between 2009 and August 2015. “We can link ships and the people involved in those seizures. It’s one degree out so it’s quite accurate.”Last year, C4ADS was able link two major seizures: a 3.1 ton seizure in Thailand in April 2015 and the 4.6 ton seizure in Singapore. Both came out of Mombasa, Kenya. By linking the two seizures, they began linking numerous other ivory exports.Utermohlen spoke of a mega-network in ivory trade wherein 21 seizures contained 81.6 tons of ivory, 4.1 tons of pangolin scales, and 200 kilograms of rhino horn.Wasser said they were trying hard to “feed into transnational investigations” by working with Interpol and other investigators. “Whether you’re pro-trade or against trade, we all want the same thing: stop the killing. That’s the fundamental thing to do right now.”last_img read more

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Spain to play in South Africa again

first_img25 October 2013Reigning world and European football champions Spain will return to the scene of their greatest triumph, the FNB Stadium in Johannesburg, for a friendly international against South Africa on 19 November, SA Football Association president Danny Jordaan announced on Thursday.It will be the first time the world number one ranked Spanish return to South Africa since they clinched the World Cup in 2010 after an extra-time victory over the Netherlands at the same venue – then known as Soccer City – thanks to a goal in the 116th minute by midfielder Andres Iniesta.Making the announcement in Johannesburg, Jordaan the match would kick-start a number of high-profile games featuring top footballing countries against Bafana Bafana.‘Mission’“It is the new Safa executive’s mission to make Bafana Bafana world-beaters again and we have lined up top-class sides to play our senior national team,” he said. “We could not have asked for a better start of this campaign than with the game against the reigning Fifa World Cup champions.“It is a dream come true for many soccer fans to once again see the likes of Iniesta and Xavi in action at the venue where they made history by lifting their first World Cup trophy. This is going to be a block-buster of a game.”The Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) said it was excited to return to the city and the venue that gave them fame.‘Gratitude’“We wish to demonstrate our gratitude for the wonderful hospitality of the South African sports authorities and the support of the country’s football fans during the 2010 South Africa World Cup, where Spain was proclaimed champion for the first time in history,” Spanish Football Association President Angel Maria Villar Llona said in a statement.“At the end of the match, played on 11 July 2010 at the same stadium, the top officials of the RFEF expressed their thanks for the support received and promised to return to South Africa to play a friendly match, in the same way we did in Vienna after winning the Euro 2008.”Safa CEO Dennis Mumble commented: “We are excited by this honour to play Spain and we ask all football lovers to rush to buy their tickets for this rare occasion as soon as ticket sales open. More information will be released in the next few days.”Previous matchesBafana Bafana have met Spain twice previously, with both matches taking place during the 2009 Fifa Confederations Cup.In Mangaung, the European champions recorded a routine 2-0 victory over South Africa in group play, but a shock loss to the USA, which ended a record unbeaten run of 15 matches, relegated them to the playoff for third and fourth against the hosts.The game turned out to be a cracker, with Spain edging it 3-2 after extra time.After a goalless first half, Katlego Mphela gave Bafana the lead after kneeing Siphiwe Tshabalala’s cross past Iker Casillas in the Spanish goal.EqualiserSpain desperately sought an equaliser and finally, with only three minutes remaining on the clock, Daniel Guiza found it after, beating goalkeeper Itumeleng Khune to his right to level matters.Two minutes later, in the 89th minute, it looked as if Spain had snatched victory when Guiza lofted a stunning goal over Khune that made it just inside the far post.An additional three minutes of play was signalled by the official on the sideline, but the contest appeared to be over. With time running out, however, South Africa won a free kick 35 metres out, directly in front of the Spanish goal.Joyous roarTo the joyous roar of the crowd, Mphela unleashed a cracking strike to beat Casillas with a rocket into the top corner of the goal.In extra time, Xabi Alonso found a winner for Spain. He fired in a free kick, Fernando Llorente failed to make contact with the ball, but his run distracted goalkeeper Khune and the ball found its way into the left hand corner of the home team’s goal.South Africa pressed hard for an equaliser, but they couldn’t find it and Spain emerged victorious after a wonderful clash.last_img read more

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Listen to the Land — 9

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jim PatricoDTN Contributing EditorBrian Martin slid a spade into a patch of cereal rye planted in corn stubble. He pried out a chunk of dark soil topped by green leaves then crumbled a bit of the dirt between his fingers. New roots, old roots, mellow silt loam. He crumbled some more dirt and gave a satisfied chuckle. “Earthworm,” he said and pointed to a shiny, wiggling creature.From the grin on Brian’s face, you’d think he’d just discovered gold.Brian is a soils geek. Finding earthworms at the entrance to a field — where heavy-equipment traffic over many years has compacted the soil — has made his day. It means his work to improve his family farm’s soils is paying off.This is important because the Martin family farm, near Centralia, Missouri, was not blessed with the best soils. As a result, yield potential sometimes is limited, especially for corn. Improve the soils, improve the yield potential. Brian thinks he can do that.To that end, the 33-year-old employs several soil-improvement strategies, including a no-till regime and a cover-crops program he hopes will build soil health and fertility. He is a member of the Soil Health Partnership and is enrolled in one of its five-year field trials. If Brian’s strategies work, they could strengthen both the farm’s economic and environmental futures.“It’s important that we leave the land better than we found it,” Brian said. “As producers, we are a steward of the land, and it’s our responsibility to take care of the resources we’ve been given.”FAMILY HISTORYBrian’s interest in the soil comes naturally. His grandfather, Kenneth Martin, who founded the farm, helped draw soil maps of northern Missouri for the government after he came back from serving in World War II. He passed his interest in soils to his son Nathan and his grandson Brian, who followed him in the farming operation.“Being cognizant of soil, erosion control and saving the ground for future generations is something he instilled in us,” Brian said.Kenneth is gone. Brian and his father, Nathan, farm together — yet separately — on 1,500 acres of cropland plus 300 acres of pasture and hay ground. They share equipment and labor, but own different business entities. Along with raising corn, soybeans and wheat, Nathan runs a 225-cow Angus seedstock and commercial operation named Martin Angus. Brian owns Martin Row Crops. The pair also does custom work.Brian has off-farm income in the form of a Pioneer seed dealership and a consulting business named Martin Agronomic Services. He also works part-time as a crop-insurance adjuster so he can afford to build equity in the farm, buy machinery and — in these low-commodity price times — “keep things in the black and not in the red,” he said.SOILS HISTORYBrian’s fascination with soil got an early start as a member of an FFA soils judging team in high school. “You get pretty good at being able to ribbon a soil sample and know the textural class just by feel,” he remembered.That high school experience served him well when he joined the University of Missouri’s (Mizzou) soils judging team. As a sophomore, Brian placed sixth nationally. “The stuff in the pits, getting down there where it counts. That’s what carried me,” he said.Soil science was a minor for Brian at Mizzou. He earned a bachelor’s degree in ag systems management (agricultural engineering) with a second minor in ag economics. He used the ag engineering background to land a job with CNH Industrial doing development work for Case IH and New Holland combines.But farming always was Brian’s long-term career choice and he came back to the farm full-time in 2012.Soil improvement was on his mind from the beginning. The Martins farm over a clay pan that starts 15 to 24 inches below the surface. Above the clay is “loess over residuum or glacial till,” said Brian the soils geek, using the taxonomic name for the soil type. A more common name is silt loam.That’s generally good soil for Midwest row crops, but the Martins’ relatively thin layer of silt loam contains only 1 to 3% organic matter. That — and the clay below it — mean the soil can’t usually hold enough available moisture for great corn yields, especially in dry growing seasons like 2018.“I’d be tickled to death if we were raising 200-bushel corn consistently,” Brian said, but 2018 yields varied from 130 to 190 bushels per acre.If the Martins’ fields had greater available water capacity, they could produce better and more consistent yields even in dry years. Organic matter and infiltration are key to available water capacity, Brian said.STRATEGIESPlanting cover crops is one of his strategies to build organic matter. It’s a strategy that works especially well on a crops and livestock operation because the Martins can rotate a wide variety of cover crops that can both feed the cattle and improve the soils. As a bonus, cows grazing cover crops in a postharvest crop field make their own organic matter contributions.Here’s a sample of the cover crops the Martins have planted in the last few years: winter barley, winter wheat, cereal rye, annual rye, crimson clover, radishes and sunn hemp. Each year, 30 to 35% of the Martins’ fields are in cover crops.The Martins use a Kinze split-row planter and a Krause drill for most of their cover crops. Brian’s first preference is the Kinze because of its accuracy. “You can get by with a reduced seeding rate if you get good seed-to-soil contact,” he said.The Martins have tried ground-broadcasting seed mixed with dry fertilizer. That can lead to streaky stands, Brian said.They also have aerially seeded into standing corn. “We have had success, and we have had complete failure,” Brian said. “It really depends on the amount of soil moisture you have. If it’s not quite moist enough, the seed won’t stick and germinate.”However the Martins plant, “as much as anything, we use cover crops to increase soil structure and water-infiltration rates,” Brian said. “They also increase organic matter and reduce erosion in the few spots that are erodible.”A 1% increase in organic matter can translate to an increase of about 1 inch of available water capacity, Brian said. That, in turn, can translate to a significant increase in corn yields. “If we can gradually build up our organic matter, a lot of this ground would be more sustainable and more profitable,” he continued. “If we could bump that (organic matter) up to about 4%, there is no reason some of these fields couldn’t raise 325- to 350-bushel corn.”That would be on top of already-good soybean yields: “I think (with more organic matter) we can improve soybean yields exponentially, even without major alterations like tiling or irrigation.”All of these soil-improvement plans are long-term with the next generation in mind. “We’re looking for incremental changes,” Brian said. “If you can improve the organic matter in your soil a little every year, eventually, you will get there.”TILL NO MOREAs for tillage, don’t even talk to Martin about it. He is not a fan.He admitted that, in some areas of the country, it’s necessary to break up and redistribute heavy residue. But, not in his area, where lower yields produce less residue. There also are long frost-free periods during winter when residue can decay. Here, he said, “Recreational tillage is not as common as it used to be, and tradition is not an excuse to continue to till. It’s not ideal, and it’s not the way I operate.”And, don’t even suggest to a soil geek that it’s occasionally necessary to use a moldboard plow for anything. “We are trying to improve filtrations rates with changes in soil structure, not destroy structure,” Brian said.The closest the Martins come to tillage is to repair ruts from fall harvest or in heavily compacted areas. They also occasionally use a three-point ditcher on their flattest ground to get water to move off the field as fast as possible. No worries about losing soil in the process: “When the slope is zero to 1%, erosion is not an issue,” Brian said.(AG/SK)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Will Apple’s FCPX Z-Depth Patent Revolutionize the Industry?

first_imgApple’s latest patent – Z-depth in Final Cut Pro X – looks to introduce light field technology to the world of video editing.Apple just recently filed a patent for a new Z-depth image segmentation workspace inside FCPX. The patent was non-specific about the way in which Apple is looking to implement the technology into their high-end editing software, but the implications are huge for the future of video editing.Z-Depth/Light-Field TechnologyZ-Depth mapping is an incredibly important imaging technology that is currently limited to still photos only for consumers. In a nutshell, z-depth relates to the physical distance between the camera and the objects it’s shooting. To capture images with z-depth data, users have to use a special device called a light field camera.A light field camera is different from a traditional digital camera because, in addition to capturing light, it can record where the light is coming from and how far the source of the light is for each pixel. There have already been some pretty significant advancements in this technology.Notably the new Lytro ILLUM which allows users to take a picture and then focus in post. Here’s a quick demo of how this technology works:You can actually buy a Lytro ILLUM for $1,299 online. However, no such technology is available for video, at least not yet. This is where Apple’s patent comes into play. With the acquisition of LinX Imaging and PrimeSense, Apple is likely trying to prepare their high-end editing platform for the inevitable day when light field video hits the market. Photo via Patently AppleApple’s patent is specifically for a technology to take the information from a light field camera and break it down into separate layers across z-space. To visualize depth, Apple has patented a new version of a histogram that will display depth information along a graph.ImplicationsAdjustable FocusThere are huge implications to having access to z-depth information. Notably, if users shoot their video using a light field camera they could potentially change the focus of their video in post-production. Didn’t nail focus correctly on set? Don’t worry – you can literally fix it in post. Apple’s patent features what looks like a slider-based depth control which could be used to adjust focus with ease.Customizable Depth of FieldIt’s also rumored that users will be able to change the size of the depth of field in post. This could have great implications for filmmaking, as you can pin-point exactly how large your depth of field needs to be by adjusting a simple slider. In addition, users would gain control over the size and potentially shape of their bokeh using such technology.Easy KeyingIn terms of keying and rotoscoping, the addition of Z-Depth technology into editing softwares, not just FCPX, would mean users could key out a subject based on position in relation to the camera, not just color. So if your subject was 4 feet away and the background was 10 feet, you could hypothetically just erase anything further than 5 feet away. This technology could replace green screens ,and it seems like Apple’s patent is hinting that FCPX will gain this ability.Simplified CompositingThis technology could also have huge implications for the compositing world, as footage with depth information already stored inside could be easily integrated into 3D modeling and compositing softwares. While FCPX isn’t an ideal software for compositing, it’s safe to assume that other softwares will be getting similar light-field technology very soon.When will we see this technology?It’s hard to say when we can expect to see this technology inside of FCPX, especially considering light field cameras aren’t video-ready yet. If and when this technology does hit, we can expect there to be a huge demand for such control, especially in the professional filmmaking world. Currently light field video cameras are only available in laboratory settings.Want to learn more about light-field cameras and z-depth mapping? Check out a few of these resources:Apple to Bring Z Depth Mapping to Final Cut Pro X – Patently AppleHigh-Speed 3D Light Field Video Cameras – RaytrixLight-Field Camera – WikipediaWhat do you think of this new technology? Could it revolutionize the film/video industry? Share your thoughts in the comments below.last_img read more

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Social media turns on AFN for signing MOU with Canada

first_imgTodd LamirandeAPTN National NewsThe Crown and the Assembly of First Nations held its first permanent high level meeting Monday.During a photo op of the meeting, the prime minister and national chief of the Assembly of First Nations signed a memorandum of understanding.It spelled out a list of shared priorities they agreed to work on.The reaction to the signing on social media was swift and largely [email protected]last_img

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