Ryan Walkinshaw – reaching for the stars

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ryan Walkinshaw has a passion for science as well as rugbyBy Katie Field, Rugby World writerRYAN WALKINSHAW is younger and slicker than your average Aviva Premiership chairman but don’t be fooled into thinking he is frivolous or in any way naïve. The 24-year-old Gloucester boss is actually a deep thinker with a wider agenda than rugby and his other sporting business interest, motor racing.Walkinshaw is passionate about physics and taught himself astronomy, cosmology and particle physics after dropping out of his business degree in Newcastle. “I read Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time when I was about 17 and it blew my mind. At school I had thought physics was a bit geeky and not really up my alley but I read that book out of interest one summer and it changed my outlook,” he says.“Most of what I want to do with the money I earn from business is invest in scientific research – space projects. A lot of private firms are involved in that now because governments are not putting the money in anymore.” Walkinshaw is particularly interested in the impact science can have on solving the world’s energy problems.“I have learned a huge amount about nuclear fusion and I believe that’s the way forward if we are going to power our planet without destroying it. Renewable energy sources we are using and looking into now are only half the picture.center_img “At the moment in this country we spend more money every year on buying novelty ring-tones for our phones than we do on nuclear fusion research.”So, while his immediate priority is ensuring Gloucester win some major rugby silverware in the next few years, he has one eye on a much bigger picture, and it can’t be a bad thing for the Kingsholm club to have someone like that at the helm. “I want to have a direct impact on changing the world for the better,” he says. “I genuinely believe if you are not dreaming about tomorrow you are never going to get there.”last_img read more

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Scale of children’s influence on parents’ charitable giving revealed

first_imgScale of children’s influence on parents’ charitable giving revealed Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Individual giving Research / statistics Youth AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis11 Howard Lake | 26 January 2015 | News  77 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis11center_img “‘Pester power’ is often seen as a negative aspect of modern society, but this research shows that children and teenagers can and do influence their parents in positive ways, whether it be persuading them to recycle, get active or even get involved in supporting charities.“Charities simply have to start thinking about children and teenagers not just as the supporters of the future, but as an important part of their supporter base today. The direct impact that young people have on charitable behaviour in adults provides an exciting opportunity for whichever charities can harness this power.”You can download a set of slides for this research from nfpSynergy. A free registration is required.[message_box title=”About the research” color=”blue”]The research was carried out via nfpSynergy’s Charity Awareness Monitor, which regularly surveys a representative sample of 1,000 16+ year olds throughout mainland Britain on charity-related questions. Data was used from the October 2014 wave.Data was only used from those with children under 18 living at home. Data was also used from the November 2014 wave of the Youth Engagement Monitor, which surveys 550 children aged 11-16 annually.[/message_box] Research by nfpSynergy reveals that a quarter of parents give to charity because their children ask them to. The same proportion are also persuaded to fundraise for charity by their children.NfpSynergy surveyed 240 parents in Britain. It found that:• 23% were asked by their children to give to good causes and did so as a result• 23% were asked by their children to take part in a fundraising event• 9% of parents had become volunteers after their children suggested it.NfpSynergy also asked parents about their children’s impact on their lifestyle. It found that, following their children’s suggestion:* 22% of parents had “become more environmentally friendly”• 18% had stopped smoking, eating more healthily or taken more exercise.What the children saidNfpSynergy also asked 550 11-16 year olds whether they had asked their parents to more active in supporting charities and whether they had taken action as a result.• 60% said they had talked their parents into donating• 38% said their parents had fundraised• 24% thought their parents had become volunteers because they’d asked them.NfpSynergy notes that when the survey of parents is broken down to those with 11-16 year old children, the actual numbers are 27% for donating, 25% for fundraising and 9% for volunteering.A good side of pester power?Jo Fischl, Senior Researcher at nfpSynergy, said: Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Seventy-second birthday of Win Tin

first_img On 12 March 2002, journalist and member of the National League for Democracy, U Win Tin, is celebrating his 72nd birthday in detention. According to information obtained from Paulo Sergio Pinheiro, the UN special rapporteur for Myanmar, and from former Burmese political prisoners, Win Tin is currently being treated at Rangoon General Hospital, where he was operated on for a hernia. He will probably soon be returned to Insein prison. Even though his overall condition is stable, a return to prison could endanger his life. Win Tin has suffered, during the 13 years of his detention, from high blood pressure, diabetes and spondylitis (inflammation of the vertebra).Reporters Without Borders (Reporters Sans Frontières – RSF) and the Burma Media Association (BMA) demand that Win Tin be released for medical reasons. The two organizations fear that a return to prison will worsen Win Tin’s fragile health, and hope that the Burmese authorities will show compassion to a sick, 72-year-old man who has spent the past 13 years of his life in prison. Conditions in Insein prison, the country’s main prison where several political prisoners have died in recent years, are not at all adapted to Win Tin’s poor health.On Win Tin’s 72nd birthday, RSF has sent the Burmese embassy in France a petition in favor of his release, signed by more than 2,500 people. RSF will discuss Win Tin’s situation during an oral presentation to the next session of the UN Human Rights Commission. In addition, dozens of European media have sponsored Win Tin, and will raise this issue on his birthday.Former editor-in-chief of the daily Hanthawathi, vice-president of the Burmese Writers’ Association, and member of the board of directors of the National League for Democracy (NLD; the opposition party), Win Tin has been imprisoned since 4 July 1989. He was sentenced to a total of twenty years for sending to the UN special rapporteur for Burma a document on prison conditions and mistreatment in Insein prison. As far as RSF is aware, at least 17 media professionals are still jailed in Burma. RSF is especially worried about journalist Sein Hla Oo, whose sentence ended in August 2001, but who has still not been released. May 31, 2021 Find out more MyanmarAsia – Pacific US journalist held in Yangon prison notorious for torture March 11, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Seventy-second birthday of Win Tin RSF_en Organisation MyanmarAsia – Pacific Receive email alerts Follow the news on Myanmar On the occasion of Win Tin’s 72nd birthday, RSF and BMA demand that the journalist, treated in Rangoon General Hospital, be released for medical reasons. News News RSF asks Germany to let Myanmar journalist Mratt Kyaw Thu apply for asylum May 26, 2021 Find out more News Help by sharing this information May 12, 2021 Find out more Thai premier, UN rapporteurs asked to prevent journalists being returned to Myanmar News to go furtherlast_img read more

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