Round-up: Bees & QPR deals close, loan exit, Whites want striker, Lapthorne wins

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesBrentford and QPR are both close to making signings ahead of next week’s transfer deadline.The Bees have agreed a deal to sign PSV Eindhoven winger Florian Jozefzoon, who is set to undergo a medical.Brentford, who are not currently interested in signing Chuba Akpom on loan despite being linked with the Arsenal youngster, remain interested in a potential deal to sign Sergi Canos from Norwich.QPR are close to completing the signing of midfielder Sean Goss from Manchester United despite interest from a number of clubs.Embed from Getty ImagesWest London Sport recently revealed Rangers were looking to sign the 21-year-old and later revealed that an offer had been accepted by United.West London Sport also revealed that QPR would listen to offers for Ariel Borysiuk and subsequently revealed that his former club Lechia Gdańsk wanted to sign the Polish midfielder on loan.Borysiuk’s move is now close to going through – and the deal to sign Goss could be completed by the weekend.Meanwhile, Darnell Furlong is close to signing the new contract he was recently offered by QPR.Embed from Getty ImagesFulham, who on Tuesday agreed a deal to sign Werder Bremen midfielder Athanasios Petsos on loan, are also looking to sign a striker.The Whites would like Middlesbrough’s Jordan Rhodes but the current asking price of £9m is too high.In cricket, fast bowler Tom Helm, who extended his contract with Middlesex this week, has been described by boss Angus Fraser as “one of the most exciting young cricketers in the country.”And in wheelchair tennis, Eastcote’s Andy Lapthorne got his Australian Open quad singles campaign off to a winning start.   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Read More →

American Milking Shorthorn Society National Convention visits Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Casey Weiss, president of the Ohio Milking Shorthorn SocietyThe American Milking Shorthorn Society recently held its National Convention in Dublin, Ohio just on the outskirts of Columbus. The event took years of planning for the Ohio Milking Shorthorn Association that hosted the event.“We tried to plan a convention that would interest all of our members. We toured Select Sires. We got to see some of the great bulls they offer and learn about their history. We took a trip to the Columbus Zoo too,” said Casey Weiss, president of the Ohio Milking Shorthorn Society. “We had the National Junior Heifer Show at the Franklin County fairgrounds for their first national qualifying show of the year. It was almost like a practice run for the county and state fairs. Then we had the National Sale on Saturday where 50 to 60 of the best Milking Shorthorns in the nation were sold.”The Milking Shorthorn breed does not have large numbers, but fills a unique role in the dairy industry.“Our herds are smaller but more stable than other larger production breeds at this point. A lot of our membership has a large number of Holsteins, for example, and then a few milking shorthorns sprinkled in almost to the point of where the Milking Shorthorns are a hobby. We do have a large number of these animals spread throughout the country in small herds. There is a bit of optimism now because they are popular as 4-H or show animals. Once people get one or two in the herd they are contagious and they end up with a herd of 40 or 50 of them,” Weiss said. “The prices are challenging. Everyone is trying to cut their costs as much as they can while still trying to maintain some level of profitable production. Many Milking Shorthorns are sold for show animals so there is a lot of demand for our females and show age calves. So, during these trying times, we are able to get a premium on some of our breeding stock.”last_img read more

Read More →

Can Team India end 24-year wait and win cricket World Cup 2007

first_imgICC World Cup 2007Finally, there they all are now. This peculiar congregation of multimillionaires, accountants, teachers, students, policemen and forklift driver. Blessed by Buddhist monks, sent off by Bollywood stars, showered with rose petals, attended to by masseurs and biomechanists, some propped up by mental skills coaches and psychologists and,ICC World Cup 2007Finally, there they all are now. This peculiar congregation of multimillionaires, accountants, teachers, students, policemen and forklift driver. Blessed by Buddhist monks, sent off by Bollywood stars, showered with rose petals, attended to by masseurs and biomechanists, some propped up by mental skills coaches and psychologists and others by blind faith and optimism.In the place where Bob Marley wrote, “One love/ One heart/ Let’s get together and feel alright,” brotherly love is going to be in short supply for seven weeks. Even in its shortened version, cricket seems to have a special ability to stretch time.Team India celebratesYes, West Indies’ own Cup is prolonged, unwieldy, overgrown. But more than most in decades past, this World Cup is more open, more unpredictable, more vulnerable to future shock. Two-time world champions Australia have lost six of their last seven ODIs. The “flightless” Kiwis’ build-up to the Cup included successful chases of totals above 335. Twice. In three days. Then they lost a warm-up game to Bangladesh. The pundits are now talking about ODI totals of 500 and cricket, it seems, can hardly wait. New Zealand’s Jacob Oram was ready to amputate a broken finger to make it to his team’s playing XI (only joking, he said later, probably after a severe phone call from Mrs Oram). The Dutch are so excited that they’ve taken unpaid leave from work and bought flight tickets with their own cash.Alright, alright, enough of the others, what about us? Could India possibly win and put an end to 24 years of yearning?It’s better to be sitting down now. Yes, India could. And no, their new “zero distraction, performance-enhancing” kit is not the cause. The World Cup 2007 is a lottery and India is chockful of high rollers willing who will get only this last gamble.The Form Book of TeamsClick here to EnlargeIt’s like Sachin Tendulkar says, “To win the Cup it’s not that you must play good cricket for 8-10 months. It’s just a matter of 8-10 important games.” Tendulkar is in his fifth World Cup and among the Indians, there is an entire generation that will not be back in 2011. Legspinner Anil Kumble will give up the short game after West Indies, his fourth Cup. For captain Rahul Dravid and Sourav Ganguly, three strikes is all they will get. After scoring 36,235 ODI runs and taking 579 ODI wickets, their collective achievements from 1,247 ODIs are all going to come down to 8-10 games.Between them, (with some help from Virender Sehwag and VVS Laxman) Dravid and the three other greybeards own most of Indian cricket’s major records. Runs, wickets, captaincy, team victories. Everything except cricket’s biggest prize.Captain Dravid consistently stamps on any suggestion that the World Cup is the one yardstick to judge a player by. “What about Ian Botham? He didn’t win a World Cup; isn’t he remembered as a great player?” But ask this unsentimental man about what the World Cup is like and he is willing to break from prose and flirt a little with poetry. “The air around a World Cup is different. There’s no other cricket going on elsewhere. You think the eyes of the world are on you.” Guess what, Rahul? They are.These four men are also the keepers of the flame. They are the last of the active India players who have memories of what owning the World Cup meant to the Indian on the street. Because on June 25, 1983, they were the Indian on the street, ordinary kids watching their elder brothers cry and their fathers dance. Ajit Wadekar says this is India’s best-ever team to go to a World Cup.Tendulkar remembers the thrill of being allowed to stay up late to join the celebrations with older boys in the neighbourhood. The Kumble household didn’t have a TV but the news reached them via firecrackers. Dravid got an ice-cream as a special treat, and a ten-year-old Ganguly went running through the roads of Behala with the Indian flag in his hands.India is a different nation now, more impatient, less tolerant; its cricket more ruthless, less innocent. But the idea of winning the World Cup still turns its knees to water.India’s cricket is less innocent today than it was in 1983 but the Cup is still its Holy Grall.”People still remember that team,” says Kumble as the greyer, plumper heroes of 1983 do their quadrennial rounds on TV. “I would definitely like to have a trophy that I can say I was a part of winning. That’s what gives you the most satisfaction. Even though most of the time in India individual performances are highlighted.” Most of the time, but never with the World Cup. Never.The quartet of emperor, worker bee, problem solver and maverick are still trying to crack the chemistry of the Cup. Kumble looks at Australia and says, “The ability to get out of tough situations more than most teams, quality players and backing the same side. Recently, they’ve changed their side and they’ve lost.”MR CONSISTENT: Will Dravid repeat Kapil’s feat?It is not just greatness that wins World Cups. After all there were mostly mortals amongst the boys of 1983. It is not merely sweat, because today everyone sweats. It is not merely planning. Everyone has computers. It is not gee-whiz coaching, because at their peak, the West Indies didn’t need any coaches and Bob Woolmer has gone empty-handed twice already.It is talent, sweat, preparation, all this and more because the prize they are all shooting for is more than a shining trophy. It is sporting immortality itself. Sehwag, Zaheer Khan Yuvraj and Harbhajan Singh finalists in 2003, came close enough to smell it. They will look upon their oldest colleagues, understand their urgency and know that soon, time will press upon them too.Average age of the teamsAustralia: 30.75South Africa: 30.02Sri Lanka: 29.25New Zealand: 28.71Pakistan: 27.73England: 27.69India: 27.68West Indies: 26.67Ajit Wadekar has called this the best Indian team to go to the World Cup. It doesn’t guarantee anything but India can look at what they have in the West Indies and feel secure. The fizz of youth, the zen of experience. Check. Hunters and collectors with the bat. Check. Pace, swing, spin. Check, check, check. India is also not the Dad’s Army it’s been made out to be (see box). If Dravid & Co are the brains and nerves behind the enterprise, men like Yuvraj, M.S. Dhoni and Irfan Pathan must supply its lung power.Six months ago, thanks to a kink in the ICC calendar, all the world’s teams met in the Champions Trophy and the old order was well in place. England couldn’t play, India had mood swings, and Australia won. Six months later, there is mayhem. The form guides show a churning amongst most sides barring South Africa who have impressively stayed on top. Even this can be explained by the fact that during this period, excluding four ODIs, South Africa have mostly stayed at home. Australia look mortal. The rest of the field believe they are in with a shot.This is not a jousting-of-nobleknights sort of World Cup. This is going to be a dogfight.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

Read More →