Sea Bright Celebrates the Resurrection of Its Library

first_img 1234567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829303132333435363738394041424344454647PreviousNext SEA BRIGHT – Generations of beachgoershave enjoyed taking a book to the beach for some second-hand romance andadventure in the sunshine. The library is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays. Lance “Chick” Cunningham, who owned thesnack bar by the beach, Chick’s Dogs, and another small building nearby, gotinvolved on one of his stops to chat with the women at Hilton’s studio. Mayor Dina Long, council members,longtime library supporters and residents new and old came out last Saturday,March 16, to celebrate the rebirth of their library which, along with manystructures in this seaside borough, was a casualty of Super Storm Sandy in2012. For the crowd of supporters gathered forthe ribbon-cutting last Saturday, the long road to recovery from that loss madethe celebration extra special. But the Borough of Sea Bright has takenthat a step further by bringing an entire library to the beach. The Sea Bright Library and Cultural Arts Center occupies the second floor of the new Sea Bright Pavilion, which also houses borough offices, council chambers, community space and beach badge operations. Then things took a turn that would soundfictional, but file it under nonfiction: a Monmouth Beach philanthropist namedJay Ross offered to build the town a library. “Sarah is the grandmother of thelibrary,” Cunningham said. The JW Ross library and cultural art center was constructed in a southwest corner of the municipal parking lot. “People asked, ‘Why is that library in a corner of the parking lot?’ ” Rooney recalled. “Because that was where Jay wanted it.” The Pavilion rises three stories abovethe municipal parking lot, with glass doors on the library level opening to anexpansive outdoor deck offering cruise ship views of the beach, sea and sky. “The town of Sea Bright came together and voted 2-to-1 to move forward,” Rooney said. A contract for the construction of the pavilion portion of the project was awarded in the spring of 2018. Like grains of sand piling up to make adune, the journey to a town library was a long one for Sea Bright. Nearly four decadesago, local artist Sarah Hilton, who had a studio in town, decided to dosomething about the fact that the town lacked a library. For a town that didn’t have an officiallibrary until 1993, the new facility is a treasure that many Sea Brighters lookupon with personal pride. Like its predecessor, the new library willserve as a crossroads for the community, with up-to-the-minute features like a “cyberbar” where visitors can plug in to recharge their devices, work at computerstations, and space for meetings, like the knitting club local artist MeganGilhool hosts on Monday nights. There are also reading nooks with comfortablechairs and a children’s room with an ocean motif.center_img Hilton, who is a friend of The Two RiverTimes founder Claudia Ansorge, also arranged for the first art exhibit in thesmall building, which featured the profile photos that photographer DannySanchez shot for the paper. It was a big success. After Ross’s death in 2007,philanthropist Franz von Ziegesar funded the expansion of the library in hismemory, increasing its size by 30 percent. “The kids needed something to do,” saidCunningham, who is now head of the borough planning board. “Sea Bright needed aplace to go.” “When we lost our library, it wasdevastating,” said the mayor, who said her son learned to read there as a preschooler.“It truly was devastating for this community.” Photos by Patrick Olivero Cunningham offered space for the libraryin his building, where he’d already put in a few games to keep the kids busy.The library project soon gathered steam. Volunteers lent their time and residentsdonated boxes of books. “We are here to celebrate Chapter Two ofthe Sea Bright Library,” Rooney said. “We have a library that is worthy of ouramazing community,” said Long. “Congratulations, Sea Bright!” By Eileen Moon Ross donated $100,000 for the project.“Jay was not easy to deal with,” Rooney recalled. “But my father could dealwith him.” Five years later, the library washeavily damaged as storm tides and heavy winds swept across Sea Bright,destroying much of the town. The borough held a referendum on construction of the new facility in September 2016, approving a total of $5.3 million toward a $12.73 million project that would include construction of a new municipal, fire, police and first aid complex. The borough anticipated covering the remainder of the costs with FEMA reimbursements and insurance coverage. “Everyone in this town came together andsupported this,” said Charlie Rooney, a councilman whose father, also CharlieRooney, was mayor when the first library was dedicated. This story originally appeared in the March 21-27 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Leafs break camp, begin four game exhibition season Tuesday against Beaver Valley

first_imgEach team had a practice before being allowed to scrimmage in front of a team of some of the best hockey minds in Nelson.“Final decisions will be mine but I can’t give 47 players a good look so having another set of eyes is good,” Maida explained, looking to the likes of former Nelson co-coach Simon Wheeldon, Mario DiBella from the Kootenay Ice Major Midget coaching staff and Greg Andrusak, just to name a few of the evaluators, to help out.First up for Nelson defending KIJHL champion Beaver Valley Nitehawks for a 7 p.m. puck drop.Wednesday the teams play game two of the series at the Hawks’ Nest in Fruitvale.Maida said fans would see a mix of veterans and rookies for the two games against the Nitehawks as Maida and assistant coach Stu Linnen assess the players.Some of those rookies include goalie Adam Maida, forwards Nolan Percival and Matt MacDonald along with defencemen Justin Post and Cole Arcuri.After Wednesday’s game Maida plans to make another round of cuts before settling on the bulk of this coming season’s roster for the final two-preseason games Sunday in the Sunflower City and, at home, Tuesday, September 11 against Castlegar Rebels.The Leafs open the regular season schedule Friday, September 14 at home against Murdoch rival Castlegar.CAMP NOTES: Two grads of Nelson Minor Hockey — Adam DiBella and Isaac MacLeod — skated with the Leafs during the weekend. DiBella was preparing for junior A camp while MacLeod, fresh off winning the NCAA Division One Men’s title in the spring, is heading back to Boston College. . . .The Leafs traded defenceman Walker Sidoni to Beaver Valley prior to camp for forward Jacob Boyczuk. . . . No word on how many players in Junior A camps may be back in the Green and White sooner than later. Maida said its possible between one and five of players off last year’s squad that was knocked out in the first round of the playoffs for the second straight season could be back. According to Leaf head coach Frank Maida Stage one of Training Camp 2012 is now complete after the team finished off three days on the ice Sunday at the NDCC Arena.Stage two begins Tuesday night at the NDCC Arena when the Leafs begin the four-game Kootenay International Junior Hockey League exhibition schedule.“Camp went very well,” Maida told The Nelson Daily Monday.“We got to see a lot of players. Some of the players stepped it up during the weekend, made it difficult for the evaluators and made it to stage two of (training) camp.”A total of 47 players attended Nelson’s training camp beginning last week. The players, starting out with physicals, were divided into three teams.last_img read more

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Head coach Maida gets stamp of approval from Leafs brass

first_imgHead coach Frank Maida looked like a magician in November when the Leafs raced to the top of the Murdoch Division.However, after the Leafs lost at home to the Castlegar Rebels prior to the Christmas break the Leafs looked anything like a well-oiled machine as the Green and White dropped down the Murdoch division faster than a pair of cement skates in Kootenay Lake.Nelson finished third behind winner Castlegar Rebels and Beaver Valley Nitehawks despite having the opportunity to clinch the division weeks before the regular season concluded.Still the Leaf executive thought there were more positives than negatives during the recent Kootenay International Junior Hockey League season and voted during a Tuesday night meeting in favour of extending the coaching contract head coach Frank Maida.  “We are excited to extend the coaching contract for another season,” said Leaf president Russell Stocks in a prepared statement. “We look forward to continuing our efforts with Coach Maida to build championship quality and high character teams on and off the ice for the fans of Nelson.”Maida, at the helm the past two seasons when Nelson was knocked out of the first round of the Murdoch Division semi finals by Castlegar Rebels in 2012 and Beaver Valley Nitehawks in 2013, will definitely have an edge when he goes player shopping during the spring recruiting season as Nelson will host the 2014 Cyclone Taylor Cup.The host club gains an automatic bye into the tournament that includes winners of the KIJHL, Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League and Pacific Junior Hockey League.The tournament, Stocks said the franchise is already started preparations to host, is held in April.The preliminary round begins the Thursday night with the top two teams in the round robin draw meeting in the Cyclone Taylor Championship Sunday afternoon.Current KIJHL champ, Castlegar Rebels, begins the 2013 Cyclone Taylor Cup Thursday against host Glacier Kings in Comox.PJHL Champ Richmond Sockeyes meet Island winner Victoria Cougars in the opening match Thursday.last_img read more

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