Deep Darkness — Geocache of the Week

first_imgMediterranean sea sideGorgeous viewsThis geocache is located in Islas Baleares, Spain in the western Mediterranean Sea near the eastern coast of the Iberian Peninsula. This idyllic area has everything you could ever dream of: beaches, prehistoric ruins, gorgeous countryside, and of course, awesome geocaching.Awesome geocachingThis geocache is in a former military zone which is now used by the public as a recreational area. It’s not suitable for little kids, people with claustrophobia, or people with nyctophobia (fear of the dark), but if you’re up for a hair raising adventure next to a beautiful ocean view (and who isn’t besides children, or people with claustrophobia, or people with nyctophobia), then this is your cache.Former military zoneAre we sure we want to do this?Got claustrophobia?Normally for Geocache of the Week, we highlight several logs written by geocachers to give robust first-hand accounts of what it’s like to actually be there. This cache offered many amazing logs, but one in particular had to be shared in its entirety. And now ladies and gentlemen, without further ado, we present to you a log by Jessex:We were looking forward to this cache. After hiking to the GZ, and looking down the shift, Mrs J says, “I’m staying up here.” Mr J got down to the first platform and started down the next ladder. With scenes from various catacomb films flashing in my head, I stopped. I swear I heard something evil in the darkness and I climbed as fast as I could back to daylight. Mrs J was kind but I was disappointed in myself, I knew I had get this cache.Down I went, ignoring the images of zombies, murderers and maniacs in my head. With my light in my pack, I descended into the darkness, the worst part when my body was in the tunnel but my head still in the shaft. As soon as I could I looked both ways down the tunnel, hoping to alleviate my fears of impending death but, alas, I could see nothing but darkness. With feet finally on the ground and light on, I could now see there was no danger, at least for as far as my light shone, 20 feet or so. Trying to remember the way from the cache page, with my back to the ladder and went right.There was a door to the left very close by, I thought how wonderful. Entering the room it grew in size as the light revealed it, I knew this was not the right place. The only option was a small door with the words “dead end” written above it, emphasising the DEAD. This tunnel was hacked from the rocks and led downward. I thought to myself, “There’s no way in hell am I going down there!” if I had no scruples, I would have high tailed it out of there and logged a find, but damn my morals, I walked into the abyss.Next I did something I knew I shouldn’t, I looked behind me. There was nothing there, of course, but now I was even more aware of the enveloping darkness and dread. At the T junction I went left as instructed but moved a bit too fast to see the cache, I had to go back and search more slowly. Eureka, I found it. But how to hold the light, cache and find a pen and open the cache without losing control. I managed but just barely. I took a TB, closed up the cache and redid it, without any monsters getting me.I noticed a light further down the tunnel, I thought I may have an easier way out. Managing to squeeze by the boulder blocking the exit and climb a little only to see I was deeper than I thought. I could not risk climbing the cliffs back to Mrs J, on fear of plummeting to my death. Dread overtook me as I realised I must leave the glorious sunshine and descend once again into the realm of the dead.Stiff-lipped, I slid into the tunnel and began walking into the darkness. My light was fading and I was sure I saw a being walking toward me, I sped up hoping to get to the turn before it did. I turned right and headed up the incline of jutting rocks, hearing something behind me, I refused to look, focusing on the tunnel ahead. At the door I closed it as far as I could, concentrated on getting to the ladder. Looking right, I saw the big room again, only this time a sinister feeling overtook me. I heard the door I had just shut begin to open. Don’t look, don’t look. Just get to the exit. I put the light into my pack, walking the last few steps in only the light offered by the ladder shaft. Up the ladder, up the ladder.I am not fit, and am carrying extra weight, but fear and adrenalin are great helpers. Up to the platform, listening to heavy breathing, was it mine or the monster’s? Legs don’t fail me now! The last few rungs almost got me but finally I was bathed in light and arms of Mrs J. We did it, mission accomplished!Favourite point, thanks.Jessex (UK)Stay strong, geocachersYou’ll be fineJust a little furtherWhich tunnel is the correct one?Is that a dead end?Jose was hereIs this the cache?Light at the end of the tunnelAnd a little turtle friend to comfort you on a job well doneContinue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.Share with your Friends:More Location:Islas Baleares, SpainN 39° 28.425 E 002° 29.127 TraditionalGC1QC0Vby Balla & Silly SharePrint RelatedI FEEL sLOVEnia: Brand New Geocaching Country Souvenir for SloveniaNovember 16, 2015In “Community”Our Newest Geocaching Country Souvenir: TürkiyeDecember 7, 2015In “Community”Summer vacation inspiration — Es Pontas (GC20APF) — Geocache of the WeekJuly 24, 2013In “Community” Difficulty:2Terrain:3last_img read more

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They’re Looking Back

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now You’re using social media tools to look at your prospective clients. You’re using things like LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook to get an understanding of who your prospective client really is, what they’re thinking about, and how you might make a connection. And that’s all well and good; you should be doing those things.But while you’re using the social tools to research your prospects, it’s important to remember that this channel works both directions. You’re looking at your prospective clients, and they’re looking back at you.When you send that LinkedIn connection request to your prospective client, they’re pulling up your profile to review it before they accept. They’re trying to get some understanding as to why you want to connect with them, what you want from them, and how you might be valuable.They’re looking at your picture. They’re checking out your headline and your job title. They’re looking at who else you’re connected to. And they’re looking at your recommendations. If your connection invite indicated that you share a group, they’re looking at what groups you belong too. They’re researching you.Your LinkedIn profile, your Twitter feed, your Facebook page (and all your other social tools) are your own personal About page.What does your About page say about you? Does it indicate that you’ve got business acumen and deep situational knowledge? Does it indicate that you’re a value creator with the ability to help your perspective client improve their business? Does it give them some indication of your past successes and what your great interests are? Or is it really an incomplete resume?You’re looking at your prospective clients. And they’re looking back. What do you want them to see?last_img read more

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Generika-Ayala caps return to spotlight with third-place finish

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netGenerika-Ayala salvaged third place honors on Saturday night after crushing an uninspired Cignal HD, 25-12, 30-28, 25-13, in the Philippine Superliga at SM Mall of Asia Arena.It was a remarkable finish for the Lifesavers, who the past few years were in the doldrums but very quickly turned things around when they started beating top teams on their way to the semifinals.ADVERTISEMENT Without a legitimate superstar to build on, Generika-Ayala took everyone’s attention when it defeated title contender F2 Logistics in the preliminary and then ranked third entering the quarterfinals.“Everything is because of our determination to win,” said Generika top spiker Patty Orendain, who led her team with 16 points.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefShe got enough help from fellow low-key teammates Angeli Araneta, Ria Meneses, Mika Lopez and Fiola Ceballos.Generika coach Sherwin Meneses lauded the players’ willingness to play their respective roles. Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue MOST READ Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Lacson: 2019 budget delay due to P75-B House ‘insertion’ PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening Doroy stays in top 10 Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño “We are very happy, all of us, this is our best Christmas,” said Orendain in Filipino. “Our coach said together we can accomplish things as long as we have teamwork.”The Lifesavers totally dominated the match except for the brief juncture in the second set where they yielded three set points. They out-attacked the HD Spikers, 40-32 and stymied the opposition’s offense with 11 kill blocks compared to three by Cignal.Cignal came out cold in the opening set and after putting up a fight in the second frame, also went out with the same lethargy, giving away a total of 25 points off errors.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion View commentslast_img read more

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Artist researcher displays Newfoundlands connections to slave trade

first_imgST. JOHN’S, N.L. — An art installation at this year’s Bonavista Biennale is shining a light on a dark corner of Newfoundland’s history — slave ships that were built on the island during the 1700s.Camille Turner, a Toronto-based artist and academic, was intrigued when she heard the largely untold story of Newfoundland-built slave ships, and she was surprised to find so many ships documented in a database of expeditions.Her installation laid out in the historic saltbox Mockbeggar Plantation Fish Store in Bonavista, N.L., includes a display of 19 cards, each commemorating a slave ship built in Newfoundland.“I didn’t expect to see this at all,” Turner said of the number of ships. “That was really quite something.”Turner’s travelling Afronautic Research Lab, on display until Sept. 15., functions as a reading room on Canada’s links to slavery, displaying records such as newspaper clippings from Canadian slave owners who were hunting down runaway people.The research lab has visited cities across the country, and Turner said each place adds another element to the narrative. On its second stop in Newfoundland, she decided the ships would be her way into the story.Each ship has a unique tale of its own. One involves free Africans liberating the kidnapped people, another is recorded as sailing with mostly children on board. Turner drew her work from a Harvard University database which compiles records of slaving expeditions between 1514 and 1866.Information on the expeditions varies, but crucially missing are identifying details about the trafficked people and their lives.“Sometimes it has how much money they made selling these people, but it doesn’t have any single name of any of the people that were part of this trade,” Turner said in a recent phone interview from Los Angeles. “They weren’t really mentioned as people but as cargo.”Turner’s installation also includes a video, filmed at the venue and in Bonavista’s rugged Dungeon Provincial Park, showing her interact with artifacts. The dimly lit room where the installation is displayed gives visual context to the stories.“I keep it deliberately dark because that’s what it’s like trying to do this work, trying to do this research, and trying to shine light on something that’s being silenced,” Turner said of her exhibit’s aesthetic.Visitors are often surprised by what they discover. Turner said people can spend a long time going through the material and taking notes on the unknown chapters of their local history.The stories Turner showcases would be nearly impossible to research with the province’s own records, she said, as Memorial University’s database does not extend far enough back. Many of the documents came from British shipping records.Turner’s aim is to bring these hidden stories to the forefront and map the global connections of the inhumane practice.In her Bonavista installation, a heavy stone sits in the middle of the floor. The accompanying video shows Turner carrying it into the space. It represents the stone ballasts that ships left behind on the African continent once their weight was replaced with stolen people.“I use the stone as a symbol to talk about the missing people,” Turner said.Stones and ships aren’t the only symbols of Newfoundland’s involvement in the slave economy.Salt fish was exported in large quantities to the British West Indies where plantation owners sought cheap and protein-rich food for slaves. According to the Heritage Newfoundland and Labrador website, annual salt fish exports to the British West Indies between 1817 and 1833 averaged 127,000 quintals (a quintal was the standard measure of 112 pounds of fish.)And elsewhere in Atlantic Canada, research is also pointing to the slave economy’s powerful role in the region’s history and development.A report from Dalhousie University released last week details the racist and pro-slavery sentiments of the university’s founder and a number of past presidents. It also traced the presence of enslaved black people in the region and discussed how taxes on trade with the slave economy supported Nova Scotia’s public funds in the 1800s.For her part, Turner said she hopes her exhibit keeps travelling the country to keep the narrative expanding, revealing hidden truths about familiar places.“Everyone sits in this history, and we sit in it differently. To gain some sort of understanding of where we are in this history is really important, and how this history shaped this place,” she said.Holly McKenzie-Sutter, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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