Around Whittier

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl eventRent assistance forms available PICO RIVERA – The city’s Housing Assistance Agency will accept applications for Section 8 rental assistance from May 1 through Aug. 31. Eligible applicants may receive federal subsidies on a portion of their rent. To qualify, at least one person in the household must have legal status in the United States and the household must not exceed the low-income guidelines set by the federal government. Applications are available in the Department of Housing Services at City Hall, 6615S. Passons Blvd., or on the city’s Web site, www.pico-rivera.org. For more information, call (562) 801-4347. Forest service to host tour ANGELES NATIONAL FOREST – The U.S. Forest Service will have its monthly naturalist-led tour on Saturday, exploring wildfires, wildflowers and wildlife. Participants will car pool to various forest locations, take short hikes, and discuss how the environment effects the flora and fauna of the local mountains. This is an excellent outing for families, Scout groups, or anyone interested in their local mountains. The tour is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $5 per person. Meet at the San Gabriel Canyon Environmental Education Center, 0.7 miles past the East Fork Bridge on Highway 39 above Azusa. Visitors should bring water, lunch, sturdy walking shoes, sunscreen, insect repellant, cameras, binoculars and dress in layers for the weather. Hiking will not be strenuous but will be over uneven and rocky terrain. Vehicles must be in good working order and have a full tank of gas. For more information on the hike, call Steve Segreto at (909)982-2879. Center to host dance group WHITTIER – The Los Nietos Community and Senior Center will host the La Habra Huff ‘n’ Puffs Senior Dance Group from 11 a.m. to noon Wednesday at the center’s senior wing, 11640 E. Slauson Ave. All are welcome to this music and dance program. For more information, call (562) 699-9898. Library Friends to hold book sale LA MIRADA – The Friends of the La Mirada Library will be selling used books from 9a.m. to 3 p.m. May 6 in the Activity Center building, behind the fire station and next door to the library, 13800 La Mirada Blvd. In addition to the selection of good-quality hardback books and paperback books, a large group of audio and video items will be available. At 2 p.m., the Friends will sell bargain books for $3 each. All proceeds will be used to purchase new books and for other library needs. For more information, call (562) 943-4255. Wills, trusts topics of union meeting WHITTIER – The National Association of Active and Retired Federal Employees, Chapter 333, will hold a meeting at 11 a.m. Thursday at the Palm Park Activity Center, 5703 Palm Ave. Guest speaker Bill Miller will talk about trusts and wills, and Cindy Greer of the Whittier Chamber of Commerce will give a presentation. The meeting is open to former and current federal employees. Sack lunches are suggested. Dessert and beverages will be provided. For more information, call Chuck Carlson at (562)695- 2126. – From staff reports160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! NORWALK – The sheriff’s Norwalk Station is collecting items for the U.S. Marines. From now through May 3, items can be dropped off at the station, 12335 Civic Center Drive. Suggested donations include packets of hot chocolate, wheat crackers, tuna in pouches, baby wipes, razors, pens, soap, sunblock, writing paper and toothpaste. For more information, call (562) 863-8711. last_img read more

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Evolutionists Two-Faced About Academic Freedom

first_img(Visited 64 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Compare two countries: in one, when their hegemony is threatened, evolutionists plead for academic freedom.  In another, they deny it to those who want a chance to debate evolution.Turkey, with its somewhat secular government but largely Islamic population, has doubts about Darwin.  Leaders there are reluctant to promote evolution, which they consider controversial, as the “glue of all biological sciences,” according to Science Now.  Moreover, the government has (at times) blocked certain educational evolution websites, and thrown roadblocks in the way of evolutionary conferences, on the grounds that “Since evolution is still a debated issue, the degree to which the organizers represent the community/country is very questionable.”  This has angered certain Darwinist academics who were expecting the Turkish government to fund a recent pro-evolution conference for students.   They appealed to freedom of speech and inquiry (similar to academic freedom) in their protest:“It sets a very dangerous precedent,” Akçay says. “Today it might be a summer school that is fairly cheap … but tomorrow it could be a young researcher coming up for tenure. … And this on top of the very worrying and worsening trend in academia and the broader society towards curtailing freedom of speech and inquiry.“But in America, Darwinists are delighted when academic freedom is denied to critics of their theory (see commentary on Evolution News & Views).   Nature breathed a “Whew!” along with the National Center for Science Education when five states adopted science standards that will teach climate science and evolution dogmatically, prohibiting efforts to grant academic freedom to skeptics of those theories.  New science guidelines supported by evolutionists begin the one-sided indoctrination “well before high school.”  They “recommend teaching evolution before students reach high-school biology classes, the point at which many states tackle concepts such as natural selection and adaptation.”In the past two months, education officials in Rhode Island, Kentucky, Kansas, Maryland and Vermont have all approved the standards by overwhelming margins. At least five more states — California, Florida, Maine, Michigan and Washington — may take up the standards in the next few months.“Whew,” says Minda Berbeco, programmes and policy director at the National Center for Science Education in Oakland, California. “So far, so good.” Swift adoption of the guidelines has been surprising but welcome news for many supporters. Evolution has been a controversial topic in US education for decades, stretching back to the 1925 ‘monkey trial’ in Tennessee, where the state prosecuted high-school teacher John Scopes for violating a statute that barred the teaching of evolution. In the past decade, those who oppose evolution have sought to enact ‘academic freedom’ laws that would allow creationism to be taught alongside evolution.The reference to creationism is a bald lie, since none of the bills prescribe teaching creationism.  Instead, they ask for honest teaching of evolutionary theory, including its strengths and weaknesses, or they forbid schools from punishing teachers who do so, such as Eric Hedin, now in hot water at Ball State (see Evolution News & Views).  In any case, evolution is the only theory allowed in the curriculum.  Not even the Discovery Institute recommends bills requiring the teaching of intelligent design.Such hypocrites.  Evolutionists are like Marxists who cry out for freedom until they get power, then they deny it to everyone else.  They’re not even good Darwinists.  They ignore the words of their Prophet Charlie, who taught in his scriptures, “A fair result can be obtained only by fully stating and balancing the facts and arguments on both sides of each question”  (See AcademicFreedomDay.com).  Until and unless we rid science of the Darwin bigots, and require them to debate the evidence, they will continue to behave like the People of Froth, foaming at the mouth against anyone who wishes to break their filibuster and discuss the issues honestly.  What are they afraid of?  Scientific evidence?last_img read more

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American Milking Shorthorn Society National Convention visits Ohio

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Casey Weiss, president of the Ohio Milking Shorthorn SocietyThe American Milking Shorthorn Society recently held its National Convention in Dublin, Ohio just on the outskirts of Columbus. The event took years of planning for the Ohio Milking Shorthorn Association that hosted the event.“We tried to plan a convention that would interest all of our members. We toured Select Sires. We got to see some of the great bulls they offer and learn about their history. We took a trip to the Columbus Zoo too,” said Casey Weiss, president of the Ohio Milking Shorthorn Society. “We had the National Junior Heifer Show at the Franklin County fairgrounds for their first national qualifying show of the year. It was almost like a practice run for the county and state fairs. Then we had the National Sale on Saturday where 50 to 60 of the best Milking Shorthorns in the nation were sold.”The Milking Shorthorn breed does not have large numbers, but fills a unique role in the dairy industry.“Our herds are smaller but more stable than other larger production breeds at this point. A lot of our membership has a large number of Holsteins, for example, and then a few milking shorthorns sprinkled in almost to the point of where the Milking Shorthorns are a hobby. We do have a large number of these animals spread throughout the country in small herds. There is a bit of optimism now because they are popular as 4-H or show animals. Once people get one or two in the herd they are contagious and they end up with a herd of 40 or 50 of them,” Weiss said. “The prices are challenging. Everyone is trying to cut their costs as much as they can while still trying to maintain some level of profitable production. Many Milking Shorthorns are sold for show animals so there is a lot of demand for our females and show age calves. So, during these trying times, we are able to get a premium on some of our breeding stock.”last_img read more

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Column: Cleaning up the mess in boxing’s heavyweight class

first_imgMagic win 6th straight, frustrate Heat in crucial East showdown Trump tells impeachment jokes at annual turkey pardon event View comments Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess There’s no lack of good, possibly even great, fighters. But so far — for reasons that start with greed and go beyond the fighters themselves — there’s been a lack of great fights.“My aim was always to be the undisputed champion,” said Lewis, who now works for Fox Sports as a ringside analyst. “These boxers now aren’t really talking about that.”That could change if fighters, their promoters and the various television platforms somehow find a way to work together. But that was unlikely to begin with, and even more unlikely now that the major participants in the heavyweight sweepstakes have aligned themselves with promoters and broadcasting platforms that don’t play well together.Anthony Joshua versus Deontay Wilder is the fight everyone wants to see. Tyson Fury is right in the mix, and there are a number of fringe title contenders who on the right night might make heavyweight history.But a highly anticipated rematch between Wilder and Fury of their December draw is off because Fury signed with Top Rank and ESPN while Wilder is fighting — at least for now — under the Showtime banner. Wilder against Joshua seems to be even further from reality as the two camps can’t agree on broadcasters, terms or even if they really want to fight each other.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles MOST READ Colombia protesters vow new strike after talks hit snag Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Bloomberg: US would benefit from more, not fewer, immigrants Wintry storm delivers US travel woes before Thanksgiving So Joshua is fighting at Madison Square Garden in June, but instead of Wilder he’s got an opponent in Jarrell “Big Baby” Miller who is a decent fighter but hardly a household name. Wilder is fighting Dominic Breazeale on May 18 at Barclay’s Center in Brooklyn, while Fury returns to the ring June 15 against Germany’s Tom Schwarz in Las Vegas.And we’re suddenly no closer to a first undisputed heavyweight champion since Lewis beat Evander Holyfield 20 years ago to win all the belts.“The heavyweights nowadays, they want to be undisputed but the business machine takes over and managers take over,” Lewis said. “They want longevity, but they’re basically slowing down the process.”The staggering number of sanctioning organizations remains mostly the same since Lewis’ day, which by itself makes unifying any title — much less that of the coveted heavyweight division — difficult. But the process is an even more daunting task now, with television networks and streaming services vying to represent fighters who figure to deliver eyeballs to whatever screen they’re on.That has already disrupted the middleweight division, where a third fight between Canelo Alvarez and Gennady Golovkin was put on hold after Alvarez signed what is claimed to be a $365 million deal with the streaming service DAZN. Golovkin finally followed Alvarez earlier this month, signing his own deal with DAZN that could possibly pave the way for the third fight in September.Joshua is also with DAZN, while Wilder — who has fought mostly on Showtime — is pondering his next move. Fury, though, recently upended talks for a rematch with Wilder of their December fight by signing with Top Rank, which has a long-term deal with ESPN.Fox, meanwhile, has ties to Wilder through its deal with Premier Boxing Champions, which also represents Efe Ajagba, the Nigerian heavyweight who has created buzz in his short career by knocking out pretty much everyone who has gone into the ring with him.The explosion of boxing across networks and streaming platforms should ultimately be good for the sport because of the interest being generated. But it also threatens some awfully good potential matchups because there are too many competing interests outside of the fighters themselves.And that concerns Lewis, who is rooting for the best meeting the best.“I look at it differently. I would want them as soon as possible,” Lewis said of the top fights. “But they can do what they want. It’s their era.” Google Philippines names new country director Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones talks with boxer Deontay Wilder before the IBF welterweight championship boxing bout between Errol Spence Jr. and Mikey Garcia on Saturday, March 16, 2019, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Richard W. Rodriguez)Lennox Lewis always wanted to fight everybody, and did so often enough to become the last person to hold all the major heavyweight titles at the same time.That meant Riddick Bowe, even after Bowe threw a title belt in a garbage can to avoid him.ADVERTISEMENT It also meant Mike Tyson, even after Tyson threatened to eat his children.“Just prison talk,” Lewis said. “At the time I didn’t even have any children.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsThe best fighting the best. That was always Lewis’ philosophy, and it culminated in a 2002 annihilation of Tyson that cemented his legacy as an all-time heavyweight great.It’s also what makes it painful to look at the mess that is the heavyweight division today. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krausslast_img read more

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