Register to Vote Online. Everybody’s Doing It.

first_imgRegister to Vote Online. Everybody’s Doing It. By: J.J. Abbott, Deputy Press Secretary SHARE Email Facebook Twitter   SHARE  TWEET Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf September 21, 2016 The Blog,  Voting & Elections A half-million people rarely would agree on anything. But that’s the number of people who’ve used Pennsylvania’s online voter registration (OVR) application since it launched last August.That’s more than the populations of Allentown, Erie, Reading, Scranton, Lancaster and Harrisburg combined.The OVR application site at register.votesPA.com registered its 500,000th user on Saturday, September 17 at 4:05pm. The 500,000th applicant was a resident of Lancaster County.To date, approximately 58 percent of users have been eligible citizens registering for the first time, while the remaining 42 percent were voters making updates to their existing voter registration, such as a change of name, address or party affiliation.Governor Wolf has made it a priority to make it easier for Pennsylvanians to participate in the electoral process.In addition to OVR, Pennsylvania recently launched 2Vote, a voter registration text messaging service. Simply text “PA” to “2Vote” (28683) on a smartphone and you’ll get the tools you need to register, locate your polling place, contact election officials and more – delivered right to your smartphone.To learn more about online voter registration, check the frequently asked questions at votesPA.com.To register to vote like hundreds of thousands of your fellow Pennsylvanians, go to register.votespa.com and fill out the application before the deadline on October 11.last_img read more

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MBB : Cohen: Boeheim’s apology for insensitive comments on allegations comes too late

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ It’s about time the finger was pointed in the right direction.The three self-inflicted jabs at his own chest during the press conference after Syracuse knocked off No. 10 Florida finally expressed the sentiments long overdue from Jim Boeheim.‘I believe I have misspoke very badly in my response to the allegations that have been made,’ Boeheim said. ‘I shouldn’t have questioned what the accusers expressed or their motives. I am really sorry that I did that, and I regret any harm that I caused. It was insensitive to the individuals involved and especially to the overall issue of child abuse.’As Boeheim read from a written statement Friday night — doing so for the second time in as many games — his words seemed sincere. Speaking slowly and with clear difficulty following Syracuse’s 72-68 win over the Gators, Boeheim issued an apology for his comments made ‘without thinking’ last week following allegations of sexual abuse against then-associate head coach Bernie Fine.He was sorry for calling Bobby Davis and Mike Lang — both of whom were former SU ball boys when Fine began allegedly molesting them — liars. He was sorry he spouted off at the mouth and said they were only looking for money in the wake of the Penn State scandal.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textI’m sorry, too. I’m sorry his apology is eons too late.Let’s put aside the fact that Boeheim’s baseless comments never should have been uttered to begin with. That goes without saying.But Boeheim had since Sunday, when Syracuse University Chancellor Nancy Cantor made the decision to fire Fine, to step forward and publicly state that his remarks were ludicrous. That he didn’t seem pompous. Like he wasn’t capable of admitting his brash insensitivity.The chances have been there, too. The statement Boeheim issued following Fine’s firing said he regrets any comments that ‘might have inhibited’ anyone with information from coming forward or that ‘might have’ been insensitive to victims of abuse.Then, after Tuesday’s game against Eastern Michigan, it was Boeheim saying his statements were made based on the information he knew at the time.Never did he take full responsibility for speaking brazenly about the plight of alleged victims of whom he knew nothing about.‘What I said last week was out of loyalty,’ Boeheim said. ‘I reacted without thinking. I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. I’m trying to learn from my mistake, and this has been hard for me.’Boeheim said after the game against Florida that he spent Thursday afternoon at the McMahon/Ryan Child Advocacy Center in Syracuse talking with the director and several other people at the nonprofit organization dedicated to putting a stop to child abuse.He vowed to do more going forward to help raise awareness and get the message out about child abuse. He said the issue of abuse is the ‘No. 1 thing’ that the Syracuse community should be concerned with.And that’s all great. It’s great that Boeheim finally seems to get it. His words seemed genuine. And his tone of voice relayed a message indicative of legitimate introspection. Kris Joseph attested to that. Having been around Boeheim for four years, he said any apology from the head coach must have been real.‘If he apologized, it’s because he really meant it,’ Joseph said. ‘He’s loyal, he’s an honest man. So if he said it, then he meant it.’But the fact remains that Boeheim will never be able to go back in time. He cannot take back what he said, and he cannot undo any emotional damage the remarks may have caused to the accusers.He said the situation has been ‘everything’ for him this week and admitted that he didn’t really think about Friday’s game in the days leading up to it. He could focus in practice, he said, but outside the gym it consumed him.As he did during his press conference Tuesday, Boeheim repeated that his forthcoming remarks were of his own desire, that no one from the university or elsewhere told him what to say or to say anything at all.But it appears that maybe it’s time for someone to realize that Boeheim must be controlled.No one shushed him last week, and we saw the results. No one made him apologize this week, and by the time he chose to do so, it was beyond late.Boeheim has admitted that sometimes he says more than people would like him to. Isn’t that enough of a cue for someone to step in?‘I think in the comments it shows what I’ve learned,’ Boeheim said.We’ll see.Michael Cohen is the sports editor for The Daily Orange, where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at [email protected], or on Twitter at @Michael_Cohen13.  Published on December 2, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @Michael_Cohen13center_img Commentslast_img read more

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Men’s volleyball falls to third-ranked BYU squad

first_imgThe unranked men’s volleyball team fell in three sets to No. 3 BYU on Friday, but it was not as easy of a victory as some might have thought if they casually glanced at the matchup on paper. Ultimately, almost all of BYU’s players on the court contributed to make every play look like a perfect dig, an on-target set and point-earning kill.“If they pass great, the advantage is definitely on their side of the net simply by virtue that they have a strong attacker in every position,” head coach Jeff Nygaard said before the game.Both BYU and USC started the game missing key players. For the Trojans, rising transfer outside hitter Gianluca Grasso, who has been putting up consistent, strong numbers since joining the team a few weeks ago, was out due to a sprained ankle. His absence was clearly felt as USC was only able to put up 36 total kills to BYU’s 45. For the Cougars, junior opposite and kill leader Ben Patch had to miss the game for an undisclosed injury, but missing Patch did not keep BYU from staying strong across the front.BYU opposite Tim Dobbert and outside hitter Jake Langlois put up a combined 23 kills, with Dobbert hitting at .500 percent. The team also maintained their consistency with the help of libero Erik Sikes’ match-leading 12 digs and middle blocker Price Jarman’s match-best five blocks.“I’m happy for the guys and their performance as a team,” BYU head coach Shawn Olmstead said. “Tim did a great job tonight, and Jake was aggressive in all areas. It was good to get some reps for the others as well, and they did a good job in that role.”The game started out with USC taking control and leading 11-5 in the first set. The Trojans were in rhythm and appeared to be playing with ease. However, BYU slowly crept back and duked it out with the Trojans at the net to eventually take the set with three consecutive points to end it 27-25. From there, BYU surged ahead with USC right on its heels, but it would be the Cougars again that pulled ahead far enough that USC couldn’t catch them at the end of the second set. By the third set, BYU had hit its stride and held the lead for the entirety of the set to finish out the game with the victory.Across the board, the Cougars outdid the Trojans in almost every category. They ended by hitting .352 to USC’s .168, nine blocks to four, 36 digs to the Trojans’ 27 and four aces to one. Part of this could be attributed to their predominantly upperclassmen starters, who have been with the program and in the system for longer than the Trojans’ younger team. “The more mature you are,” Nygaard said, “the more experience you have, the more comfortable you are in your own skin and the more comfortable you are with whatever is thrown your way.”last_img read more

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