Tragedy for QPR youngster

first_imgThe father of QPR youngster Michael Doughty has been found dead at his home in Lincolnshire.Nigel Doughty, owner of Nottingham Forest, was 54.He bought Forest in 1999 for £11m and took over as chairman at the City Ground three years later.A lifelong fan, he is estimated to have invested more than £100m of his personal fortune in the Championship club.Michael Doughty, 19, is a product of QPR’s youth system and made his first-team debut in an FA Cup tie against Blackburn last season.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

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Letter: Oakland needs to close the deal on A’s stadium

first_imgOakland needs to closedeal on A’s stadiumIt is getting a little frustrating to constantly see the city of Oakland lag behind on everything from policing to education and now to the win-win that is the building of the new A’s stadium.After two pro franchises have just left the city and the one remaining franchise desperately wants to stay in Oakland. Not only are they going to privately finance their own stadium, but now the A’s are going to build affordable housing at the Coliseum, and the …last_img

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Honours for SA’s finance minister

first_img14 October 2013 South African Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan was on Saturday evening named sub-Saharan Africa’s Finance Minister of the Year by Emerging Markets, a website that provides news and analysis on international economics and global financial markets. “The prudent fiscal policy led by Pravin Gordhan, who became finance minister in 2009 at the height of the global economic crisis, has been praised by analysts, especially since South Africa is more exposed than other emerging markets to dangers stemming from an eventual pullback of quantitative easing by the Federal Reserve,” read the citation by Emerging Markets. In his acceptance speech in Washington, DC, where he has been attending the annual meetings of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Gordhan thanked Emerging Markets for its recognition of South Africa and its economic team, which has kept the South African economy on track during a very difficult time. “Together with our Nigerian and other colleagues, we hope to make Africa a much greater economy.” Gordhan was critical of the sudden change in the narrative on emerging markets, which until the second quarter of this year were praised for managing their economies very well, contributing more than 50% to global economic growth, and for lifting large numbers of people above the poverty line. “Three months later, we are apparently fragile and we are terrible managers of our economies. We, the emerging markets, are here to stay. We live in an interconnected world, and more importantly, we live in an interdependent world. There is no decoupling from you, the advanced economies, and there is no decoupling from us, the emerging markets,” Gordhan said. In his address at the 28th International Monetary and Financial Committee meeting, Gordhan warned that while stronger economic activity in advanced economies would have a positive impact on global growth, it would also have negative spill-over effects on emerging market and developing countries. “Going forward, downside risks remain elevated. In the euro area, recent indicators point towards a re-emergence from the recession, but with its weak banks and high sovereign debt, the euro area remains fragile and vulnerable to sharp shifts in sentiment,” Gordhan said. “The United States has seen several quarters of relatively strong economic activity, and this had a positive impact on global growth. At the same time, however, uncertainty regarding the unwinding of unconventional monetary policies and the threat of potentially devastating budgetary challenges continue to pose serious risks to the global economy.” Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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Internet Explorer, WebGL and a Return to the Bad Old Days

first_imgMost of the response from Microsoft’s competitors regarding “native HTML” is mockery. Some of that is deserved – it’s clearly a marketing buzzword. But where are the substantive responses to Microsoft’s performance claims? Demos aren’t evidence of better performance, and the overall value of a browser is about more than a bunch of fish in a virtual aquarium. But how does the performance of Microsoft’s browser hold up? And more importantly: what does Microsoft’s approach mean for open standards and the future of the Web?What exactly is “native HTML5”? InfoQ has a post looking into it a bit and concludes that it’s about more than just performance: it’s about deep integration into the OS. I’m not too worried about that at this point though. What about Microsoft’s claims – is its implementation on HMTL5 in IE9 and 10 legitimately faster than Chrome or Firefox? My informal testing of IE9 and the IE10 Platform Preview are inconclusive. OF course, IE smokes its competitors with its own demos. But there’s not really enough HTML5 in the wild to make a real-world comparison.So what about standards? If IE can do things that other browsers can’t, what does that mean for developers? If IE’s HTML5 is better, can other browser makers catch-up?Here’s something I haven’t seen discussed in relation to the native HTML5 announcement: WebGL, a standard that enables hardware accelerated 3D animation in HTML5 (you can see some examples here). Unlike WebSockets and other unfinished specs, WebGL is now a complete specification with support from every other major browser. Microsoft, however, has no plans to implement WebGL.Here’s the statement the company gave us this week:Browser vendors are implementing WebGL as a way to get partial hardware acceleration after developers rewrite their code. With Internet Explorer 9, developers receive GPU-powered hardware acceleration without rewriting a single line of code which we feel is a better outcome. We look at the real world patterns of the things developers are building today and want to build tomorrow, and balance this against the risk with including things that will likely change in the future. Sometimes there seems to be a race going on to try to make headlines “by claiming to be first” to implement specifications. We don’t think that is healthy. Interoperability is not about being first. Instead, we wanted to provide a stable platform for the web. We focused on building test suites with the W3C for specs that were considered “done”, but where there were real interoperability gaps. These are not that the “sexy” problems that get talked about.With HTML5Labs.com we are focusing on creating a world-class environment for developer to experiment with emerging web specifications. As an example, we have updated our WebSockets implementations 5 times in just three months.Notice the Websockets mention. Microsoft is obsessed with Websockets, it even created one of those text-to-speech animations to developers how horrible Websockets is and how Microsoft is protecting them from unfinished standards. But it’s a classic misdirection. OpenGL is not Websockets.And judging from the comments on the IE10 announcement on the official IE blog, developers want WebGL.Internet Explorer General Manager Dean Hachamovitch told CNET last year. “I think it’s different markup. You’re telling developers, ‘Go write something else.’”In other words: Microsoft thinks it knows what developers want better than they do. I suppose it’s the Steve Jobs approach – maybe it will work for them. Native HTML is arguably “better,” and maybe Microsoft can force other browser makers to support hardware acceleration and lower level OS integration to speed up rendering and animation without the need for WebGL.That, or Microsoft is ignoring an accepted standard in favor of its own technology – and setting the groundwork for the “bad old days” of Web fragmentation all over again. I wrote earlier about the mixed messages Microsoft is sending – on the one hand saying that developers should be able to write markup once and run it anywhere, and on other saying developers should create alternate versions of their sites for non-IE9+ browsers.It’s a shame. IE9 and 10 look to be great browsers. But the harder I look at what Microsoft is doing, the harder it is to believe that its browser strategy is developer friendly.Combine this with Chrome’s Native Client and the ongoing war over a video codec standard and I think we’ll see a return to the bad old days soon.Disclosure: Microsoft paid for Klint Finley’s travel and lodging to attend MIX, and MIX is a ReadWriteWeb sponsor Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid Related Posts klint finley Why You Love Online Quizzescenter_img How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Tags:#Analysis#hack last_img read more

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VLE #MFLNchat recap

first_imgBy Molly C. HerndonThe Personal Finance Virtual Learning Event, held June 2-4, featured daily Twitter chats focused on the topics discussed in that day’s webinar. The webinar speakers were on hand to answer questions and to dig deeper in to the topics discussed in the 90-minute sessions. Here, you can view all the tweets shared during these daily chats, including great discussion on promoting positive financial behavior change and resources to share and use with clients.last_img

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