Houston-area Episcopal Latino mission feeds thousands feeling coronavirus impact

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Health & Healthcare AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 COVID-19, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Posted Apr 3, 2020 Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Rev. Pedro López, vicar of Iglesia Episcopal San Pedro in Pasadena, Texas, helps distribute food during its food drive.[Diocese of Texas] Iglesia Episcopal San Pedro, in Pasadena, Texas, fed over 2,300 people through its feeding and assistance ministry on April 1. San Pedro’s nonprofit organization, North Pasadena Community Outreach, or NPCO, partners with the Houston Food Bank to host a weekly food pantry. Normally NPCO distributes food to around 200 families as well as offering benefits assistance. However, the novel coronavirus pandemic has resulted in a nearly 250% increase in the numbers of those served.“Many of our families are especially vulnerable because they work jobs without wage protection and job security. When so many employers cancel on their housekeepers or workers, families lose their income,” said the Rev. Pedro López, vicar of San Pedro. “The situation is even more devastating for refugees and undocumented immigrants who will not be eligible for financial assistance from the government,” López added.San Pedro’s feeding ministry was made possible through the participation of over 20 volunteers. “Most of these volunteers are young adults from the church community who are themselves out of work,” said the Rev. David Goldberg, curate. “They stepped up to help when we sent many of our regular volunteers home because their age made them especially at risk.” Volunteers are required to practice social distancing, wear masks and gloves, and avoid close contact with clients.While the food pantry was open, 446 cars followed a mile-long trail that wound through three school parking lots and down a nearby thoroughfare. “I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Celia Curiel, site manager. “Normally we see a couple of hundred families, but many of these people have never been here before. I’ve even seen friends and fellow parishioners here for the first time. So many people are struggling.”Iglesia San Pedro is located in an industrial suburb of Houston. The neighborhood consists of mostly immigrant families, many of whom suffer from the effects of endemic poverty. According to the Episcopal Health Foundation, the average life expectancy in North Pasadena is more than 20 years below the average in more affluent Houston-area neighborhoods.“The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated existing vulnerabilities. This makes the work of Houston Food Bank partners, like San Pedro, all the more important,” said Houston at-large City Councilman David W. Robinson. “I have been so impressed by the willingness of religious communities, including and especially Episcopal churches, to do God’s work, even as they responsibly close their doors for Sunday worship.” New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Houston-area Episcopal Latino mission feeds thousands feeling coronavirus impact Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

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PPP files no-confidence appeal at CCJ

first_img…asks court to urgently review Appeal Court’s “absolute” majority decisionOpposition Leader and General Secretary of the People’s Progressive Party (PPP), Bharrat Jagdeo through his Attorneys on Tuesday filed a notice of application for special leave to the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ), in relation to the decision of the Guyana Court of Appeal on the no-confidence cases.The Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) is Guyana’s final court of appealThe application was filed by Douglas Mendes, Devesh Maharaj, Anil Nandlall, Kandace Bharath, and CV Satram. The named respondents in this matter are: Attorney General Basil Williams, Speaker of the National Assembly, Dr Barton Scotland, and Minister Joseph Harmon, a representative of A Partnership for National Unity (APNU).The application is seeking an order to grant Jagdeo special leave to appeal the majority judgement of the Court of Appeal of Guyana delivered on March 22, 2019 by acting Chancellor Yonette Cummings-Edwards, Justice Rishi Persaud, and Justice Dawn Gregory.Further, the Attorneys are seeking an order to treat the hearing of the application as urgent and a further order for an expedited hearing of the application. Also, it is seeking an order directing that the hearing of the application for special leave to appeal be treated as the hearing of the appeal against the majority judgment, and that certain orders be made in the appeal.This includes an order setting aside or reversing the majority judgement of the Court of Appeal of Guyana and resorting to the decision of the acting Chief Justice Roxane George made on January 31, 2019; a declaration that the resolution of the National Assembly is valid; and a declaration that the no-confidence motion moved by Jagdeo was validly passed on December 21, 2018.Jagdeo, through his attorneys, is also seeking a declaration that puts to rest that 33 votes/members constitute a majority of all the elected members of the National Assembly within the meaning of Article 106 (6) of the Constitution of Guyana. The application is also seeking costs.Nandlall has said that there would be a case management conference conducted by the CCJ on Friday morning in respect of this matter. He said, “We expect that directions will be given by the Court, which will bring about an early hearing and determination of the appeal”.RulingThe acting Chief Justice, in January, upheld the December 21, 2018 passage of the no-confidence motion, ruling that in Guyana’s 65-member National Assembly a majority is 33. This, however, was appealed by Attorney General Basil Williams.But while Justice Persaud has dismissed the appeal and concurred with the ruling of the High Court, his colleague appellate Judges allowed the State’s appeal.Both Justices Cummings-Edwards and Gregory opined that while 33 was the majority of the 65-member National Assembly, the successful passage of a no-confidence motion required an “absolute majority” of 34 and not the “simple” 33 majority that has been used to pass ordinary business in the House.Following the ruling, Jagdeo stated that the Constitution of Guyana is pellucid on what number of votes is needed for the passage of a no-confidence motion; it is a majority of all elected parliamentarians – the majority of 65 is 33 votes.According to him, the Constitution is clear in saying that the vote is valid if a majority of all elected parliamentarians – 33 parliamentarians – cast their vote in favour of the passage of a no-confidence motion.He added that all right-thinking Guyanese would conclude that 33 is the majority of 65 – a conclusion that was extensively addressed by the acting Chief Justice in her ruling.“No strange mathematics can change what is in the Constitution … a majority of all elected members in the National Assembly is 33,” Jagdeo said.He explained that the argument about a vote of 34 being needed was not the argument he expected to be used by the Appeal Court to overturn the ruling of the Chief Justice (ag).The Opposition Leader noted that in 2014, when the Alliance For Change (AFC), supported by APNU, advanced a no-confidence motion against then President Donald Ramotar, it was done with the explicit acknowledgement that AFC and APNU had the 33 votes that were needed for their no-confidence motion to be successful.He added that prior to the December 21, 2018 vote, the coalition Government boasted that it had 33 votes, and, therefore, the no-confidence motion could not be passed with a vote of 32.After the vote, according to him, both President David Granger and Prime Minister Moses Nagamootoo accepted that the PPP/Civic no-confidence motion was validly passed in the House.In addition, Attorney and social commentator, Christopher Ram posited that the Court made a grave error of unquestioning acceptance of decisions and principles from afar with no regard that, at best, they could be of no more than persuasive value.In the process, he added, Friday’s decision marked a turning point in Guyana’s jurisprudence, introducing a harmful level of uncertainty into constitutional and statutory interpretation in local courts. In this regard, he stated that the Court was “wrong” in its interpretation of what constitutes a majority in the National Assembly.last_img read more

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Rules of Thumb for Ductless Minisplits

first_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. Since 2008, when Carter Scott built a pioneering Massachusetts house that was heated and cooled by just two ductless minisplits, GBA has endeavored to publish reports from the field to guide people designing homes that are heated and cooled by ductless minisplits. We’ve learned a lot on this topic since 2008.My article on Carter Scott’s approach to heating and cooling was called “Just Two Minisplits Heat and Cool the Whole House.” Since that article was published, builders, engineers, and researchers have shared their minisplit experience and data. Carter Scott has given technical presentations at several conferences (including the Westford Symposium on Building Science and NESEA’s BuildingEnergy conference); energy consultant Marc Rosenbaum has written several valuable articles on the topic for GBA (including “Minisplit Heat Pumps and Zero-Net-Energy Homes” and “Practical Design Advice for Zero-Net-Energy Homes”); and researchers Kohta Ueno and Honorata Loomis have published useful monitoring data (“Long-Term Monitoring of Mini-Split Ductless Heat Pumps in the Northeast”).We now have enough information on the use of ductless minisplits to heat and cool cold-climate homes to set out some rules of thumb. The nine rules of thumb that I present below are based on the work of Scott, Rosenbaum, Ueno, and Loomis, to whom I am indebted. 1. Design your building to have an excellent thermal envelope If you want to heat and cool your building with just one or two point-source heaters, you want an above-average thermal envelope. That means that the building needs a very low rate of air leakage; above-code levels of insulation; and high-performance windows. 2. Consider snow loads when placing outdoor units If you live in snow country, your outdoor unit needs to be protected by a roof — but not a roof that inhibits… center_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberslast_img read more

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VLE #MFLNchat recap

first_imgBy Molly C. HerndonThe Personal Finance Virtual Learning Event, held June 2-4, featured daily Twitter chats focused on the topics discussed in that day’s webinar. The webinar speakers were on hand to answer questions and to dig deeper in to the topics discussed in the 90-minute sessions. Here, you can view all the tweets shared during these daily chats, including great discussion on promoting positive financial behavior change and resources to share and use with clients.last_img

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