Arcata coach Ryan Bisio’s position in jeopardy after school board vote

first_imgArcata >> Arcata High School head basketball coach Ryan Bisio may be out as the Tigers head coach after the Northern Humboldt Union School District’s Board of Trustees voted to leave him off the list of approved coaches for the upcoming winter sports season.Bisio, who has compiled a 68-19 record in three seasons as the Tigers head coach, was removed from the school’s ‘Changes of Certified and Classified Personnel’ list presented to the school board at a meeting on Tuesday at the McKinleyville …last_img

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2016 Ohio Crop Tour I-71 Day #1

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest       Presented by AgroLiquidMarion CountyCorn Summary: As we wrap up Day #1 we continue to see some better corn and substantial moisture. This 20 inch field was planted April 25th and there is very little disease and some pest pressure (see picture below). Ear fill was solid and so was the yield guess at 171.Soybean Summary: Even though this field was just across the lane it was planted a full 31 days later than the corn. They have turned out to be a nice even, healthy stand with some blooms yet to go. Canopy height was 38 inches and first node showed up 4 inches high. We rate this field as Good with a great chance of turning to Excellent.Marion CountyMarion CountyMarion CountyMarion CountyWyandot CountyCorn Summary: This was by far the muddiest field we’ve been into today. Still some standing water in some parts. Still a good amount of N in these stalks. Very light GLS below the ear but virtually nothing above the ear. The ears didn’t match the look of the stands. Pollination issues prove that this rain is way too late here. Our yield estimate is 154.Soybean Summary: Plenty of moisture for these beans and this great looking stand will use it as pods continue to fill out. Canopy height was 32 inches and the first node was about 3 inches high. We are noticing a lot of marestail this year as many farmers looked like they just let them go. We rate this field as Good.Wyandot CountyWyandot CountyWyandot CountyWyandot CountyCrawford CountyCorn Summary: Pretty nice field here. A little disease pressure but no insect pressure to speak of. Ear fill was average but the kernels were on the small side. The crop is green and the ground is in great shape. The number we came up with here is 165.Soybean Summary: The soybeans looked really healthy, but they are not as heavily podded as you might expect. Bean leaf beetle and Japanese beetle were munching on this field. Canopy height was 40 inches and first node height was 2 inches. The population was about 160,000, with some spots a bit lower due to skips. We rate this field as Good.Crawford CountyCrawford CountyCrawford CountyCrawford CountyHuron CountyCorn Summary: If the yards in this area are any indication, rain has been very timely this year (see picture below). The corn here wasn’t all that tall, but after our yield calculations we are pretty sure it is just that type of hybrid. The ear fill here was too good. This farmer should have pushed pops (29,000) a little more here. The leaves are showing some corn borer pressure, but from a health standpoint this is one of the best fields we’ve been in. Our yield guess is 163.Soybean Summary: This field was planted in 15 inch rows and they also look healthy but short. Pods were just starting to fill. Canopy was 30 inches high and the first nodes were 3 inches off the ground. Disease and insect pressures were low but this is just an average looking field. We rate it as Good.Huron CountyHuron CountyHuron CountyHuron County Ashland CountyCorn Summary: Not a lot to say about this corn. Populations were pushing 35,000 and that explains the tip-back, a good thing in this case. Ear fill was good and very little pressures noticed. More dry dirt here. Yield estimates at 205…best so far on this leg of the tour!Soybean Summary: As far along as the corn field was, the beans were not. As you can see by the picture below, this was planted into stubble. Some plants only had one pod so far, but the health of this field promises some nice potential. Canopy height averaged 26 inches and first node was 4 inches up. We rate this field as Good.The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins visited with one of the tour scouts, Pickaway County’s Bill Black at this stop.                                      Ashland CountyAshland CountyAshland CountyAshland CountyWayne CountyCorn Summary: This is one of the healthiest corn fields we have seen. It is also the driest dirt we have been into. This area has received some of the rains over the past couple of days, but have been dry recently. Population here was 29,000 and ear fill was excellent. Our yield check is at 168.On a side note, the field across the street was planted into wheat stubble. The farmer told us that the wheat was harvested for feed on the dairy in mid May and planted to corn shortly thereafter. You can see some pics of that field below as well.Soybean Summary: Although this field was in really good shape, it is still not as good as our Delaware County stop. Japanese and Bean Leaf Beetles along with some grasshoppers were feeding here. Canopy height was 40 inches and the first node height was 2 1/2 inches high. Pods are starting to fill and we rate this field as excellent!Wayne CountyWayne CountyWayne CountyWayne CountyHolmes CountyCorn Summary: As far as views go, these contour strips are nice to look at. There is no doubt this field was planted when it was wet. Planting date was May 20th. Pollination issues are as bad as we have seen and to make matters worse, tip-back has begun to set in. You’ll see in the picture below that both Northern and Gray are here too. The dry summer has kept disease and insect pressures at bay. Our yield guess is an even 100.Soybean Summary: Also planted when it was wet. Marestail was present, as was some disease and Japanese Beetles and Green Stink Bugs. Canopy height was only 24 inches tall and there weren’t many pods to count. We rate this bean field as Fair.Holmes CountyHolmes CountyHolmes CountyHolmes County Richland CountyCorn Summary: Not only did this field look extremely healthy, but the N was still really good here. Every stalk had a nice ear on it, but our samples were all 12 around. The yield calc here is at 164. Planting date was the 3rd week of May.Soybean Summary: Soybeans were just as clean and there were more blooms here yet to be podded than we have seen so far. Canopy height was 36 inches and the first node height was 2 inches. Ranks up there with the best beans thus far. We rate these as excellent.Richland CountyRichland CountyRichland County Knox CountyCorn Summary: This field was planted during the last week of May and before these latest rains, this area was over an inch deficient from the 10 year average. Ear fill was good and our pop number was anywhere from 31,000 to 33,000. No disease pressure and very little insects noticed here. This plot looked healthier than our previous stop and our yield guess is 152.Soybean Summary: These beans were nice and still growing. They were planted thick and the pods looked A-O.K. Canopy height was about 38 inches and the first node was 4 inches up. We rate this field as good.Knox CountyKnox CountyKnox CountyKnox CountyMorrow CountyCorn Summary: The signs of stress are easy to see in a good part of this county. The field we scouted, planted on May 25th, looked good from the road, but once we plucked some ears we realized that the yield is not going to be great. Very light disease above the ear and the stalks were firing throughout. Our yield check pegged this field at 142 bushels per acre.Soybean Summary: The picture below show just how results will vary based on the soil type. Compared to Delaware and Licking Counties, these beans were shorter, with a canopy height of 26 inches. First node height was about 2 inches. Little disease here but the insects were feeding pretty heavy here. Stalks were very lightly podded and we rate this field as good.Morrow CountyMorrow CountyMorrow CountyMorrow CountyLicking CountyCorn Summary: Overall the quality in this corn was really good and the disease pressure was much less than our first stop. The one thing that hurt this field was quite a few skips in the rows were in and that will take a hit on our estimate. Insect and weed issues were non existent and the health was very good. Field was planted on May 14th. Our estimate for this corn comes in at 146 bushels per acre.Soybean Summary: Some of these canopy heights were close to 40 inches high and as you can see in the pictures below, there are still blooms on the top and more potential left. Disease pressure was light, but we did see some bean leaf beetle feeding throughout the field. This area received over 2 inches of rain in the past 4 days and that will really help as these beans finish out. We rate this field in excellent condition.Licking CountyLicking CountyLicking CountyLicking CountyDelaware CountyCorn Summary: Our first field of corn was planted April 18th in 20 inch rows. This very nice stand was populated at 29,000. Tip-back was noticed here and about 20% of the ears were beginning to droop, something we may see a bit more of on this tour. Northern was evident below the ear and some N was missing. Yield estimates here were a solid 190 bushels to the acre.Soybean Summary: Disease and insect pressures were very light. Very little white mold and a few grasshoppers and beetles. First nodes were an inch off the ground and the pods were filling nicely. The canopy height was 36 inches. Field was planted April 26th. We rate this field good to excellent.Delaware CountyDelaware CountyDelaware CountyDelaware Countylast_img read more

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How To Download And Install Apple’s iOS 8 Beta

first_imgTags:#app development#Apple#iOS#iOS 8#iOS 8 beta#iPad#iPhone#iPod Touch#WWDC#WWDC 2014 Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Apple’s annual gift to iPhone and iPad developers is ready for a summer of design and development, bug testing and quality assurance programs. The iOS 8 beta is now available for download.See also: Apple’s iOS 8: What You Need To Know About Its New FeaturesThis year, iOS 8 beta is packed full of features. Before digging into the 4,000 new application programming interfaces in the iOS 8 beta, we know that Apple has added a ton of new capabilities to its the games development stack, added health and fitness features and iCloud “extensibility” features. The iOS 8 beta may not be as dramatic as the complete redesign of the operating system featured in iOS 7 in 2013, but there is more than a lot to dig through before the new iPhone comes out later this year.See also: What Developers Need To Know About iOS 8Below are some of the basics of what you’ll need to know to load the new iOS and start building apps.Before Downloading The iOS 8 BetaBefore you get started, here are several items you should have on hand:An iOS developer account. These cost $99 a year and are available through Apple’s developer website.A development device specifically for use with the iOS 8 beta. You really shouldn’t use your a personal device you rely on; beta versions of operating systems can be buggy and crash.Worse, you might lock yourself out of your device. Apple will release several versions of iOS 8 beta throughout the summer; older updates are eventually phased out, and if you’re still running one when that happens, your phone will basically shut down—as happened to many users last year with the iOS 7 beta.A device that supports the iOS 8 beta. At the moment, that would be the iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C, iPhone 5, iPhone 4S, iPad Air, iPad Mini (both generations), 4th generation iPad, 3rd generation iPad and the iPad 2. The iPod Touch 5th generation is also supported. iOS 8 beta does not support the iPhone 4.The identifier for your device. For instance, an GMS iPhone identifier is A1533, A1547 or A1530. You will need this to know which version of iOS 8 beta to download. You can determine your iOS device identifier here for iPhones and here for iPads.Your device’s Unique Device Identifier (UDID). This is a string of 40 numbers and letters that serves as a kind of serial number for your iDevice. You will need to register your developer device in the iOS Development Center using the UDID, and you can’t complete the iOS 8 beta installation without authenticating the device this way.A backup of your device to iTunes and/or iCloud. Just in case the device crashes so badly you have to start from scratch, you can stash a backup in iTunes for a quick recovery. Also note that all documents on iOS 8 test devices need to be backed up to the new iCloud beta environment for both iOS 8 beta and Mac OS X Yosemite.Apple says that once you download iOS 8 beta, you will not be able to downgrade to earlier versions of iOS. There are ways around this (and we’ll outline them in a later post), but be prepared to be stuck in the beta until the end of the summer, when Apple releases the Gold Edition of iOS 8 shortly before the next iPhone comes out.Preparing For The iOS 8 BetaHere are a few things to note before you download the .dmg file of iOS 8 beta:Have the most current version of iTunes downloaded and ready.Charge your battery. There’s nothing worse than borking a download because you ran out of juice.Download And InstallOn your Mac, go to the iOS Development Center and download the appropriate version of the iOS 8 beta. This will take a few minutes.Open the .dmg file and find the .ipsw file. It should be the only file in the .dmg package.Connect your developer device to your computer and launch iTunes.Click on the iPhone button in iTunes. This will bring up your stats (such as memory use and serial numbers). Go ahead and back up your phone to iTunes now if you haven’t done so already.Press the option button (right click) to update the operating system in iTunes. It’s better to choose the “update” option in iTunes than the “restore” option. A window will open where you can choose the iOS 8 beta .ipsw file. Download it (which will take about 10 minutes).Wait patiently.That is how you officially get the iOS 8 beta. You will likely notice that the beta OS is kind of slow, eats your battery a little quicker than you are used to (especially on older devices), and is generally sort of buggy. This is why you don’t put beta operating systems on your personal devices.A Few Notes Of CautionIn 2013, the iOS 7 beta was extremely popular among both mobile developers and ordinary consumers. The popularity was due, in part, to the big iOS redesign that people just had to see for themselves. It’s also a sign of the democratization of technology, as the spread of tools and know-how enable larger numbers of people to take control of their devices.Last year, that trend turned out to be problematic for many iOS beta users (and, generally, for Apple as well).If you’re not a registered Apple developer and still want to download the iOS 8 beta, plenty of websites around the Internet have historically offered to give you access to the new operating system. These sites ask for your device’s UDID and use it to get you access to the beta software, usually for a fee of between $10 and $30.It’s not clear that this particular trick will still work this year. Apple released a new developer agreement with iOS 8, so these third-party sites might run higher risks offering access to the beta software. That being said, people tend find ways around those sorts of restrictions.While the cheaper fees here might seem like a good deal, doing business with these sites aren’t usually a good idea. In addition to the normal risks involved with putting a not-ready-for-prime-time operating system on your phone or tablet, you’d also be giving some anonymous third party your UDID. That identifier could be used to track you, to advertise to you and possibly even to deliver remote malware to your device.In other words, it’s generally not a good idea to share your iPhone’s UDID. You also won’t get access to the iOS Developer Center, which would let you install subsequent, and presumably less buggy, updates to iOS 8 beta. Don’t forget that as Apple rolls out new versions of the beta, it discontinues old versions; you risk lockout if you don’t update when that happens.So proceed at your own risk. And if you have any doubts, you might want to err on the side of caution and wait for the official release of iOS 8 later this year, lest you find yourself dealing with a balky, prone-to-crashing phone all summer—or worse. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementcenter_img dan rowinski Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

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