Brand champions will be rewarded

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Brand champions will be rewardedOn 12 Mar 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. With the growing importance of risk management capital, HR has a vital roleto play in protecting the profile of its firm as an employer of choiceThis is the first year listed companies have to report risk in accordancewith the Turnbull recommendations that became part of the Stock Exchange’scombined code in 1999. Few have noticed this piece of corporate red tape and yet it could lead to achange in HR managers’ responsibilities. Plcs that rely on their relativemarket position to drive sales and attract recruits and investors now have toevaluate and consider their brand, its value and the risks to it. Private companies, charities and government organisations must take noticeof the risks to their brand, especially as they often do not have the sameresources as their public counterparts to invest in brand development. HR will have to take on a more defined brand manager’s role: developing andpromoting a brand leader’s position as an employer of choice. Risk to the brandas an employer is rapidly becoming the big management challenge of the decade. This is especially so as businesses are increasingly reliant on the peoplethey employ and the brand image they build as the primary ways of increasingthe value of their business. Reputation, perception and employee motivation arecited as some of the most significant risks in a survey linked to Turnbull. The need for HR managers to perform as brand champions for employers has ledto increased demand for perception audits that can help organisationsunderstand their people’s motivation and levels of satisfaction. These auditssupport a strategic and long-term approach to the recruitment and retentionissues surrounding the high talent that organisations need to impress. Many HR managers and directors are, for the first time, talking with theirPR and marketing personnel about branding as an employer. This is leading to arefocus of recruitment methods, advertising and web strategies, with humancapital at their heart. There will be challenges ahead, especially for companies confident of theirmarket strength. It no longer follows that the brand leader for products orservices is an employer of choice in a sector. If complacency sets in and brandleaders assume they will have the pick of the best candidates, they may missthe very people they need to help maintain their market-leading position. A medium-size company, or one struggling at the bottom of a particularmarket, can build a strong brand as an employer and attract better people toallow it to punch above its weight. The top brands have the most to lose. The impact of a brand leader nothaving the best staff can be devastating. In a world where perception isreality, a brand leader modestly under-delivering is likely to attract far moreattention than a brand wannabe vastly over-performing. When Plcs report risk to their business in accordance with the Turnbullrecommendations, or when such reporting becomes normal – as inevitably bestpractice dictates – those that have made a start in brand building will beahead of the game. Turnbull means that HR needs to understand the risks inherent in recruitmentand retention and their potential impact on brand. But it is also anopportunity – it could give HR a bigger role to play at board level, wherechampioning the brand as an employer of choice is set to become a key function.By Sherilyn Shackell,  managingdirector of Highfield Human Solutions last_img read more

Read More →

OUSU election changes

first_imgNominations opened on Thursday for the forthcoming OUSU elections, after the introduction of electoral reforms to attempt to encourage increased voter turnout.Candidates will have three weeks to campaign after nominations close, with the election to be held during 6th week. Plans for this period include an increased number of hustings both within common rooms and at neutral venues, with the hope that this will motivate those who attend to cast their electronic vote in a few weeks time.    Campaign rules are also set to make it easier for candidates to publicise themselves. Rules restricting the use of social media have been relaxed, whilst candidates are now allowed to interact more with the student press. In addition slates (where candidates run together but each must be elected individually) can now contain four candidates, providing one of these is standing for the position of Vice President for Graduates. The previous limit was of three sabbatical officers per slate.   Returning Officer, Jonathan Edwards, told Cherwell that there is really no limit to how candidates could promote themselves, “The starting point for the campaigning rules is that anything which is not actually prohibited is allowed. The main restrictions are an expenditure limit, intended to ensure fairness and limitations on the use of email, primarily to avoid election-related spam.” He described the campaigning rules as “liberal,” although practices such as false-statements, bribery and intimidation are treated as ‘illegal.’   In last year’s election, just 23% of undergraduates made the effort to vote. However OUSU hope that this year their increased promotion of the elections will see this number increase substantially. They have taken out full page advertisements in the OxStu, will be publishing manifestos free of charge and have already emailed students to tell them that an election is coming up. OUSU also intends to publish election details more extensively on its website, to encourage a greater interest in the election process.    Jacob Diggle, standing for President, explained why this election should capture the imagination of Oxford students, “This year will see at least three full slates of candidates, including presidential candidates from non-traditional backgrounds,” suggesting, “This will hopefully help to improve engagement and help students to feel the power of their choice.” He urged all undergraduates to take interest because this election could change “how you are taught, where you live, who you can turn to if something goes wrong.” Diggle concluded, “OUSU elections are very important because they will decide the future direction of the student union – a body with real powers to shape every student’s experience.”   However, many undergraduates did not share Diggle’s enthusiasm about the forthcoming election. George Heppel, a Mansfield 2nd year, commented, “It’s a popularity contest. Who can honestly say they’ve read any of the manifestos of any of the candidates? The only reason anyone votes is because they’re friends with them, or a friend of a friend, or are in the college, or they’ve been pestered into voting.”Martha Mackenzie, current OUSU President urged students to vote for reasons greater than personal pressure, claiming, “Student politics can be very important. Whomever is elected in the upcoming contest will represent students not only to the most important members of the University but often also to the outside world, they will also be charged with making sure your student experience is the best it possibly can be. Furthermore, Oxford is in the privileged position that it is able to really contribute to national debates and has the power to effect substantive change.”   Meanwhile Ben Manley, a Worcester fresher, was not even aware that there was an election coming up. He responded to the question “What do you think OUSU does for you” with the answer “Not a clue.” Another student explained why this may be the case, “The general feeling among Oxford students is that OUSU is not important to us. The elections are never well publicised and are certainly much less significant than JCR Bench elections in colleges,” continuing, “The JCR Bench at my college has a much bigger impact upon my university experience.” To such criticisms, Mackenzie asserted, “Without a student union there would not be anyone representing students to the University and the departments. Crucial decisions are constantly made at this level, particularly decisions that will seriously impact upon the student experience. Similarly the central union provides a significant amount of services and support that allow common rooms to work to the best of their ability. Both these factors make it all the more important that OUSU is working as hard as it possibly can to reach out to students and work to make its priorities relevant.”last_img read more

Read More →

Iheanacho undergoes concussion protocol

first_imgRelatedPosts Aguero could be out of action until November, Guardiola says David Silva recovers from COVID-19 EPL: Vardy primed for another prolific season after brace at West Brom Kelechi Iheanacho will be available for Leicester City’s clash with Norwich after undergoing a concussion protocol. The striker was substituted at half-time during Saturday’s defeat to Manchester City after a collision with visiting goalkeeper Ederson, who caught Iheanacho on the chin and throat with his fists. After an assessment, Iheanacho briefly returned to the pitch before being taken off at the interval. Manager Brendan Rodgers praised his forward’s courage and said he is his “normal self”, but because of the possibility of a concussion, Iheanacho has had to go through a six-day programme, which meant he was withdrawn from contact sessions in training. “There’s an enhanced care procedure in place but he’ll be available for Friday,” said Rodgers. “We’ve gone through the protocol from the game, so he’s obviously not in contact but he’s been training and working, he’s done similar to what all the players have done who have been in contact. When the time comes, he’ll have passed through the procedures. “He felt he could maybe have gone on, but he looked a bit groggy at half-time. I always have to go with the medical team, and the advice was he was better coming off. “But he’s recovered well. He’s been his normal self but we have to take care, which is the right thing to do. “After the game, we were showed it again, and it’s not something you want to see again. The run, and the courage he showed, was absolutely incredible. He’s a tough boy.” Iheanacho has scored eight goals and set up four more in his 15 appearances across all competitions this season.Tags: Brendan RodgersEdersonKelechi IheanachoManchester Citylast_img read more

Read More →

Scouting Louisville and its high-powered offense with Syracuse cornerback Keon Lyn

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ For the past two games, Syracuse defenders have watched opposing teams run the ball down their throats without reprieve. First it was South Florida, with mobile quarterback B.J. Daniels running the zone option to perfection. Next came Munchie Legaux and Jordan Luallen, tormenting the SU defense once again en route to a 35-24 win.This week Syracuse takes on Louisville, a team ranked No. 11 in the country and in the Top 10 in the Bowl Championship Series standings. The Cardinals’ quarterback, Teddy Bridgewater, is arguably the best player in the Big East as just a sophomore. He is mobile, but has emerged as more of a pocket passer in 2012.The media caught up with Syracuse cornerback Keon Lyn, a native of South Florida where Bridgewater went to high school, to talk about defending the league’s top player during this week’s interview session.Q: Talk about what you’ve seen from Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater on film and what it is that makes him so successful. What do you have to do as a defense to combat that?Lyn: That offense, they do a lot of shifts and adjustments, and get our eyes bad and get us lined up wrong. But we’ve just got to come prepared and be sound. You’ve got to communicate out there as a defense. It’s a great team, they’re undefeated and their quarterback is playing great. You’ve just got to be sound. You can’t make no mistakes against teams like these.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textQ: They have some good skill players and wide receivers that are tall and fast. What do you have to do to nullify their advantage there?KL: Just don’t overthink it, because we’ve seen great receivers all year. Just go out there and play your game. Be patient and win at the line of scrimmage. Just win before the snap. Know your assignment and just take one play at a time and you should be fine out there.Q: Louisville runs a little bit of the zone read but not as much as your previous two opponents, who both ran for over 200 yards. Are you guys glad to see that go away a little bit, or would you like another crack at it?KL: You’re kind of glad that they don’t do it that much. Two weeks straight we’ve struggled with it, so I wouldn’t just throw it out at the easy for Louisville. They might come out and try to run a zone read and see what they can do with it at first before they go back to their regular things. You just have to be prepared for anything. They’ve got a great quarterback, great receivers, great running back. They play sound football.Q: When you were playing high school football at Miramar High School in South Florida, did you play against Teddy Bridgewater?KL: Teddy is from around the same area, and I knew Teddy. But we didn’t play against each other. I didn’t play my 11th-grade year, and we played (his school) Miami Northwestern. But I didn’t play football that year. … I know Teddy very well. We’re close off the field and on the field.Q: Is there anything from what you knew about Bridgewater back then that you can tell some of the other guys in the SU secondary, or is he totally different now under Louisville head coach Charlie Strong?KL: He don’t make the same mistake twice. He’s a great player. He can create plays with his feet, too, and in the pocket. He’s becoming a great player, and he knows the game inside and out having a year under his belt with his offense. He’s probably going to be one of the best players — even though he is now, he’s one of the best players now — he’s probably going to be the best player in the Big East next year. Comments Published on November 9, 2012 at 12:13 am Contact Michael: [email protected] | @Michael_Cohen13last_img read more

Read More →