Evolutionists Two-Faced About Academic Freedom

first_img(Visited 64 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Compare two countries: in one, when their hegemony is threatened, evolutionists plead for academic freedom.  In another, they deny it to those who want a chance to debate evolution.Turkey, with its somewhat secular government but largely Islamic population, has doubts about Darwin.  Leaders there are reluctant to promote evolution, which they consider controversial, as the “glue of all biological sciences,” according to Science Now.  Moreover, the government has (at times) blocked certain educational evolution websites, and thrown roadblocks in the way of evolutionary conferences, on the grounds that “Since evolution is still a debated issue, the degree to which the organizers represent the community/country is very questionable.”  This has angered certain Darwinist academics who were expecting the Turkish government to fund a recent pro-evolution conference for students.   They appealed to freedom of speech and inquiry (similar to academic freedom) in their protest:“It sets a very dangerous precedent,” Akçay says. “Today it might be a summer school that is fairly cheap … but tomorrow it could be a young researcher coming up for tenure. … And this on top of the very worrying and worsening trend in academia and the broader society towards curtailing freedom of speech and inquiry.“But in America, Darwinists are delighted when academic freedom is denied to critics of their theory (see commentary on Evolution News & Views).   Nature breathed a “Whew!” along with the National Center for Science Education when five states adopted science standards that will teach climate science and evolution dogmatically, prohibiting efforts to grant academic freedom to skeptics of those theories.  New science guidelines supported by evolutionists begin the one-sided indoctrination “well before high school.”  They “recommend teaching evolution before students reach high-school biology classes, the point at which many states tackle concepts such as natural selection and adaptation.”In the past two months, education officials in Rhode Island, Kentucky, Kansas, Maryland and Vermont have all approved the standards by overwhelming margins. At least five more states — California, Florida, Maine, Michigan and Washington — may take up the standards in the next few months.“Whew,” says Minda Berbeco, programmes and policy director at the National Center for Science Education in Oakland, California. “So far, so good.” Swift adoption of the guidelines has been surprising but welcome news for many supporters. Evolution has been a controversial topic in US education for decades, stretching back to the 1925 ‘monkey trial’ in Tennessee, where the state prosecuted high-school teacher John Scopes for violating a statute that barred the teaching of evolution. In the past decade, those who oppose evolution have sought to enact ‘academic freedom’ laws that would allow creationism to be taught alongside evolution.The reference to creationism is a bald lie, since none of the bills prescribe teaching creationism.  Instead, they ask for honest teaching of evolutionary theory, including its strengths and weaknesses, or they forbid schools from punishing teachers who do so, such as Eric Hedin, now in hot water at Ball State (see Evolution News & Views).  In any case, evolution is the only theory allowed in the curriculum.  Not even the Discovery Institute recommends bills requiring the teaching of intelligent design.Such hypocrites.  Evolutionists are like Marxists who cry out for freedom until they get power, then they deny it to everyone else.  They’re not even good Darwinists.  They ignore the words of their Prophet Charlie, who taught in his scriptures, “A fair result can be obtained only by fully stating and balancing the facts and arguments on both sides of each question”  (See AcademicFreedomDay.com).  Until and unless we rid science of the Darwin bigots, and require them to debate the evidence, they will continue to behave like the People of Froth, foaming at the mouth against anyone who wishes to break their filibuster and discuss the issues honestly.  What are they afraid of?  Scientific evidence?last_img read more

Read More →

UK riots: Losses estimated at around 100 million pounds

first_imgStores smashed and looted by rampaging mobs, buildings in flames – the damage was to London and other English cities, but the images were beamed around the world.Four days of riots have already cost businesses and insurers hundreds of millions of dollars. The cost to Britain’s reputation – and its lucrative tourist trade in the run-up to the 2012 Olympic Games – may be incalculable.London’s historic centre, visited by millions of tourists a year, has been almost untouched by the riots which hit a handful of inner-city and suburban areas. That hasn’t stopped images of flaming buildings and shattered shops under headlines like “London’s burning” flashing around the globe.”People read that there are riots in London, they think people are rioting on Tower Bridge or in front of Parliament,” said Tom Rees, senior travel and tourism analyst at market research firm Mintel.”The impression people are getting in other countries is that a lawless state existed in London for a few days,” he added. “The impression could be fostered that it’s just not safe, and that’s a tremendous problem for tourism.”So far there is little hard data, but Rees said there are anecdotal reports about people cancelling trips to London.”I think there is certainly going to be a damaging short-term impact on arrivals,” he said.Patricia Yates of Visit Britain said tourism businesses had seen “concern from some consumers” but not yet cancellations.Most tourist attractions have been unaffected by the rioting. Museums, art galleries, and West End theatres have remained open – though several smaller theatres in riot-hit London neighbourhoods cancelled performances on Tuesday.advertisementThe sports industry has been hit, with a soccer match scheduled for Wednesday between England and the Netherlands at London’s Wembley stadium cancelled to free up police officers for riot duty. Britain’s soccer authorities said they were in talks with police to see whether this weekend’s season-opening matches of the Premier League could still go ahead in London.Tom Jenkins, chief executive of the European Tour Operators Association, said the images of riots looked bad, but the disturbances would have little long-term impact on Britain’s resilient tourism industry.”My members move tens of thousands of visitors in London every day and I haven’t had any reports of anyone being caught up in it,” he said.”We’ve had major terrorist bombings, we’ve had sustained IRA campaign, we’ve had riots before. London is one of the most vibrant and safest places a tourist could go to. And that remains the case.”Aside from the impact on tourism, the riots have hurt a huge range of British businesses, big and small.The looters’ targets ranged from corner stores, stripped of booze, cigarettes and candy, to chains selling youth-friendly gear such as sportswear retailer JD Sports, music-seller HMV.A huge warehouse in north London owned by Sony Corp. subsidiary Sony DADC was torched on Monday, destroying thousands of computer games, DVDs and CDs – including the stock of a distributor for dozens of independent music labels.Domino, one of the labels affected, said the new single by British band Arctic Monkeys will only be available for download only because it has no physical copies to ship to stores.Colin Stanbridge, chief executive of the London Chambers of Commerce and Industry, said the riots could not have come at a worse time – less than a year ahead of the 2012 Olympics and with Britain’s economy still fragile after a prolonged recession.”At a time when the capital’s businesses should be focusing on growth and job creation, the riots have prevented them from going about their day-to-day business,” he said. “Many firms have had to put contingency plans in place, with some forced to close early in order to save their property from possible criminal damage.”The Association of British Insurers says insurance companies are expecting losses of “well over” 100 million pounds ($160 million) from the mayhem, although Rolf Tanner, spokesman for insurance giant Swiss Reinsurance Company, said all estimates of the cost of the damage are premature.”The unrest has so far hit mainly the poorer areas of London and other cities, where insurance density and insured values tend to be lower than the country average,” he said.Most retailers hit by looting will be covered by insurance policies, but James Lowman, chief executive of the Association of Convenience Stores, said some small shopkeepers “might be uninsured or underinsured.”He said those retailers can use a piece of 19th-century legislation called the Riot Damages Act to claim money back from the police for failing to protect them – but only if they apply within 14 days. Lowman said his association was trying to get the government to extend that period.advertisementHe is more worried about the long-term effect on small businesses, should trouble and fear persist.On Tuesday stores in many parts of London closed early or even boarded up their windows from fear of violence that never materialized.Lowman said that trade from shutdowns can’t be claimed back from insurers. And small stores can’t afford the private security guards employed by larger retailers.”In Northern Ireland, which had trouble with riots for many years, there is evidence there that sometimes retailers just give up,” Lowman said. “And that’s tragic.”last_img read more

Read More →