Jeff Van Gundy: Warriors feel ‘picked upon’ and so do NBA referees

first_imgThere’s a storm a’brewing says Jeff Van Gundy. Between the Warriors and NBA referees. Between NBA referees and the Warriors. Between NBA referees and the league’s rank and file.“I do think the Warriors right now feel as they’re being picked upon,” Van Gundy said on a recent appearance on the Joe, Lo and Dibs show on 95.7 The Game. “And I think the NBA officials think that they’re being attacked, not just by the Warriors, but throughout the league.”To illustrate the dynamic, we return you to …last_img

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2016 Ohio Crop Tour I-71 Day #1

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest       Presented by AgroLiquidMarion CountyCorn Summary: As we wrap up Day #1 we continue to see some better corn and substantial moisture. This 20 inch field was planted April 25th and there is very little disease and some pest pressure (see picture below). Ear fill was solid and so was the yield guess at 171.Soybean Summary: Even though this field was just across the lane it was planted a full 31 days later than the corn. They have turned out to be a nice even, healthy stand with some blooms yet to go. Canopy height was 38 inches and first node showed up 4 inches high. We rate this field as Good with a great chance of turning to Excellent.Marion CountyMarion CountyMarion CountyMarion CountyWyandot CountyCorn Summary: This was by far the muddiest field we’ve been into today. Still some standing water in some parts. Still a good amount of N in these stalks. Very light GLS below the ear but virtually nothing above the ear. The ears didn’t match the look of the stands. Pollination issues prove that this rain is way too late here. Our yield estimate is 154.Soybean Summary: Plenty of moisture for these beans and this great looking stand will use it as pods continue to fill out. Canopy height was 32 inches and the first node was about 3 inches high. We are noticing a lot of marestail this year as many farmers looked like they just let them go. We rate this field as Good.Wyandot CountyWyandot CountyWyandot CountyWyandot CountyCrawford CountyCorn Summary: Pretty nice field here. A little disease pressure but no insect pressure to speak of. Ear fill was average but the kernels were on the small side. The crop is green and the ground is in great shape. The number we came up with here is 165.Soybean Summary: The soybeans looked really healthy, but they are not as heavily podded as you might expect. Bean leaf beetle and Japanese beetle were munching on this field. Canopy height was 40 inches and first node height was 2 inches. The population was about 160,000, with some spots a bit lower due to skips. We rate this field as Good.Crawford CountyCrawford CountyCrawford CountyCrawford CountyHuron CountyCorn Summary: If the yards in this area are any indication, rain has been very timely this year (see picture below). The corn here wasn’t all that tall, but after our yield calculations we are pretty sure it is just that type of hybrid. The ear fill here was too good. This farmer should have pushed pops (29,000) a little more here. The leaves are showing some corn borer pressure, but from a health standpoint this is one of the best fields we’ve been in. Our yield guess is 163.Soybean Summary: This field was planted in 15 inch rows and they also look healthy but short. Pods were just starting to fill. Canopy was 30 inches high and the first nodes were 3 inches off the ground. Disease and insect pressures were low but this is just an average looking field. We rate it as Good.Huron CountyHuron CountyHuron CountyHuron County Ashland CountyCorn Summary: Not a lot to say about this corn. Populations were pushing 35,000 and that explains the tip-back, a good thing in this case. Ear fill was good and very little pressures noticed. More dry dirt here. Yield estimates at 205…best so far on this leg of the tour!Soybean Summary: As far along as the corn field was, the beans were not. As you can see by the picture below, this was planted into stubble. Some plants only had one pod so far, but the health of this field promises some nice potential. Canopy height averaged 26 inches and first node was 4 inches up. We rate this field as Good.The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins visited with one of the tour scouts, Pickaway County’s Bill Black at this stop.                                      Ashland CountyAshland CountyAshland CountyAshland CountyWayne CountyCorn Summary: This is one of the healthiest corn fields we have seen. It is also the driest dirt we have been into. This area has received some of the rains over the past couple of days, but have been dry recently. Population here was 29,000 and ear fill was excellent. Our yield check is at 168.On a side note, the field across the street was planted into wheat stubble. The farmer told us that the wheat was harvested for feed on the dairy in mid May and planted to corn shortly thereafter. You can see some pics of that field below as well.Soybean Summary: Although this field was in really good shape, it is still not as good as our Delaware County stop. Japanese and Bean Leaf Beetles along with some grasshoppers were feeding here. Canopy height was 40 inches and the first node height was 2 1/2 inches high. Pods are starting to fill and we rate this field as excellent!Wayne CountyWayne CountyWayne CountyWayne CountyHolmes CountyCorn Summary: As far as views go, these contour strips are nice to look at. There is no doubt this field was planted when it was wet. Planting date was May 20th. Pollination issues are as bad as we have seen and to make matters worse, tip-back has begun to set in. You’ll see in the picture below that both Northern and Gray are here too. The dry summer has kept disease and insect pressures at bay. Our yield guess is an even 100.Soybean Summary: Also planted when it was wet. Marestail was present, as was some disease and Japanese Beetles and Green Stink Bugs. Canopy height was only 24 inches tall and there weren’t many pods to count. We rate this bean field as Fair.Holmes CountyHolmes CountyHolmes CountyHolmes County Richland CountyCorn Summary: Not only did this field look extremely healthy, but the N was still really good here. Every stalk had a nice ear on it, but our samples were all 12 around. The yield calc here is at 164. Planting date was the 3rd week of May.Soybean Summary: Soybeans were just as clean and there were more blooms here yet to be podded than we have seen so far. Canopy height was 36 inches and the first node height was 2 inches. Ranks up there with the best beans thus far. We rate these as excellent.Richland CountyRichland CountyRichland County Knox CountyCorn Summary: This field was planted during the last week of May and before these latest rains, this area was over an inch deficient from the 10 year average. Ear fill was good and our pop number was anywhere from 31,000 to 33,000. No disease pressure and very little insects noticed here. This plot looked healthier than our previous stop and our yield guess is 152.Soybean Summary: These beans were nice and still growing. They were planted thick and the pods looked A-O.K. Canopy height was about 38 inches and the first node was 4 inches up. We rate this field as good.Knox CountyKnox CountyKnox CountyKnox CountyMorrow CountyCorn Summary: The signs of stress are easy to see in a good part of this county. The field we scouted, planted on May 25th, looked good from the road, but once we plucked some ears we realized that the yield is not going to be great. Very light disease above the ear and the stalks were firing throughout. Our yield check pegged this field at 142 bushels per acre.Soybean Summary: The picture below show just how results will vary based on the soil type. Compared to Delaware and Licking Counties, these beans were shorter, with a canopy height of 26 inches. First node height was about 2 inches. Little disease here but the insects were feeding pretty heavy here. Stalks were very lightly podded and we rate this field as good.Morrow CountyMorrow CountyMorrow CountyMorrow CountyLicking CountyCorn Summary: Overall the quality in this corn was really good and the disease pressure was much less than our first stop. The one thing that hurt this field was quite a few skips in the rows were in and that will take a hit on our estimate. Insect and weed issues were non existent and the health was very good. Field was planted on May 14th. Our estimate for this corn comes in at 146 bushels per acre.Soybean Summary: Some of these canopy heights were close to 40 inches high and as you can see in the pictures below, there are still blooms on the top and more potential left. Disease pressure was light, but we did see some bean leaf beetle feeding throughout the field. This area received over 2 inches of rain in the past 4 days and that will really help as these beans finish out. We rate this field in excellent condition.Licking CountyLicking CountyLicking CountyLicking CountyDelaware CountyCorn Summary: Our first field of corn was planted April 18th in 20 inch rows. This very nice stand was populated at 29,000. Tip-back was noticed here and about 20% of the ears were beginning to droop, something we may see a bit more of on this tour. Northern was evident below the ear and some N was missing. Yield estimates here were a solid 190 bushels to the acre.Soybean Summary: Disease and insect pressures were very light. Very little white mold and a few grasshoppers and beetles. First nodes were an inch off the ground and the pods were filling nicely. The canopy height was 36 inches. Field was planted April 26th. We rate this field good to excellent.Delaware CountyDelaware CountyDelaware CountyDelaware Countylast_img read more

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Farm Service Agency highlights from 2017

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Through the work of dedicated staff in over 2,100 county and state offices, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) provides vital farm safety-net assistance to agricultural producers across America.“We’ve seen recent challenges in farm income and commodity prices,” said Robert Johansson, Acting Deputy Under Secretary for the Farm Production and Conservation mission area. “The ‘safety net’ provided in the 2014 Farm Bill has helped producers withstand economic losses as well as losses resulting from natural disasters. Loans for operating expenses, farm purchases and other purposes help current producers stay in business and allow a new generation of farmers and ranchers get their start.”Agriculture demands working capital. According to Johansson, FSA provided credit, either directly or guaranteed through commercial lenders, to 120,000 family farmers across the country.In fiscal year 2017, USDA Farm Loan Programs pumped $6 billion in support to a diverse group of producers across America. That was the second highest total in FSA history. Over $2.5 billion of that total was direct and guaranteed operating loans, and another $3.5 billion was allocated for direct and guaranteed farm ownership loans. This additional financing enabled farmers and ranchers across the country to access capital to start their operations, or to expand their existing operations. The new lending continued the recent growth in FSA’s farm loan portfolio.FSA highlights from the year include:Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage (ARC/PLC) and Conservation Reserve Program (CRP):USDA is issuing approximately $8 billion in payments under the ARC and PLC programs to agricultural producers who suffered market downturns in 2016.In 2017, FSA distributed $1.6 billion in CRP payments to over 375,000 Americans for doing their part in improving water quality, reducing soil erosion and increasing wildlife habitat.Disaster assistanceIn response to Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, USDA announced special procedures to assist producers in states and territories who lost crops or livestock or had other damage to their farms or ranches. Also, because of the severe and widespread damage caused by the hurricanes, USDA provided flexibility to assist farm loan borrowers. FSA dispatched additional staff to the affected areas and, in response to a request for assistance, rolled out a special program providing vouchers to dairy herd owners in Puerto Rico who used the assistance to purchase feed.USDA also provided extensive assistance for a variety of other disasters throughout the country, including drought in the northern high plains, wildfires in the west and central plains, floods, tornados, freezes and other storms. For example, in July, USDA authorized the use of additional CRP lands for emergency grazing and haying in and around portions of Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota affected by severe drought. USDA also added the ability for farmers and ranchers in those areas to hay and graze CRP wetland and buffer practices. This followed a previous action in April and June to assist the area and provided livestock producers with an additional feed source. In October, FSA teamed with other USDA agencies to provide assistance to wildfire-damaged areas of northern California, including loans and other disaster assistance programs.New farmersIn August, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue signed a Memorandum of Understanding with officials from SCORE, the nation’s largest volunteer network of expert business mentors, to support new and beginning farmers. The agreement provides new help and resources for beginning ranchers, veterans, women, socially disadvantaged Americans and others, providing new tools to help them both grow and thrive in agri-business.Johansson said these accomplishments are in line with Secretary Perdue’s goals of maximizing the ability of the men and women of America’s agriculture and agribusiness sector to create jobs, prioritizing customer service every day for American taxpayers and consumers and ensuring the food we produce meets the strict safety standards we’ve established while always remembering that America’s agricultural bounty comes directly from the land.last_img read more

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PM Modi’s Nagpur visit cancelled due to ‘heavy rain forecast’

first_imgPrime Minister Narendra Modi’s scheduled visit to Nagpur on Saturday has been cancelled, a press release issued by Maha Metro said on Friday evening. Mr. Modi was to inaugurate a new segment of Nagpur Metro and some other projects during his visit to Nagpur. A press release by Maha Metro, which is executing the metro project, said that due to the heavy rain forecast by the Meteorological Department, the Prime Minister’s visit to Nagpur on September 7 has been cancelled. Inauguration of the new ‘Aqua line’ of Nagpur Metro stands postponed, it said.last_img

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