Honours for SA’s finance minister

first_img14 October 2013 South African Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan was on Saturday evening named sub-Saharan Africa’s Finance Minister of the Year by Emerging Markets, a website that provides news and analysis on international economics and global financial markets. “The prudent fiscal policy led by Pravin Gordhan, who became finance minister in 2009 at the height of the global economic crisis, has been praised by analysts, especially since South Africa is more exposed than other emerging markets to dangers stemming from an eventual pullback of quantitative easing by the Federal Reserve,” read the citation by Emerging Markets. In his acceptance speech in Washington, DC, where he has been attending the annual meetings of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Gordhan thanked Emerging Markets for its recognition of South Africa and its economic team, which has kept the South African economy on track during a very difficult time. “Together with our Nigerian and other colleagues, we hope to make Africa a much greater economy.” Gordhan was critical of the sudden change in the narrative on emerging markets, which until the second quarter of this year were praised for managing their economies very well, contributing more than 50% to global economic growth, and for lifting large numbers of people above the poverty line. “Three months later, we are apparently fragile and we are terrible managers of our economies. We, the emerging markets, are here to stay. We live in an interconnected world, and more importantly, we live in an interdependent world. There is no decoupling from you, the advanced economies, and there is no decoupling from us, the emerging markets,” Gordhan said. In his address at the 28th International Monetary and Financial Committee meeting, Gordhan warned that while stronger economic activity in advanced economies would have a positive impact on global growth, it would also have negative spill-over effects on emerging market and developing countries. “Going forward, downside risks remain elevated. In the euro area, recent indicators point towards a re-emergence from the recession, but with its weak banks and high sovereign debt, the euro area remains fragile and vulnerable to sharp shifts in sentiment,” Gordhan said. “The United States has seen several quarters of relatively strong economic activity, and this had a positive impact on global growth. At the same time, however, uncertainty regarding the unwinding of unconventional monetary policies and the threat of potentially devastating budgetary challenges continue to pose serious risks to the global economy.” Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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Corn Harvest Cab Cam — Schmitmeyer Farms, Mercer County

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Ag Net crew visited the farm of the Schmitmeyer family for the first week of Feeding Farmers in the Field, fall 2016 edition. Corn harvest had just begun on their Mercer County farm south of Celina at the time OAN’s Joel Penhorwood visited with Pat Schmitmeyer about their yield, operation, and more.last_img

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Cinema 4D Video Tutorial: Write-On Effect

first_imgIn this exclusive tutorial, we show you how to create a custom write-on effect in Cinema 4D.Write-on effects are really cool in 2D, but in the following tutorial we will take the effect to a new dimension. If you’re a 3D designer, chances are you often create 3D text. So instead of simply having your text stay still, why not have it animated?In this video tutorial I demonstrate how to create an animated write-on effect in Cinema 4D, along with a pretty clever shatter effect. The tutorial covers:Choosing FontsUsing SweepsUsing the Bend EffectUsing CamerasUsing the Shatter EffectYou can also download the project file using the following download link.[maxbutton id=”22″]If you have any questions regarding this tutorial please feel free to ask in the comments below!Check out more Cinema 4D Video tutorials in the Cinema 4D section of the PremiumBeat blog.last_img read more

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Plus the Value You Add

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now Despite how common it is, of the toughest challenges a sales person (or sales organization) can face is having a product or service with the same cost basis as their competitor’s. You each pay the same price for the component parts that make up what you sell, whatever that may be. The difficulty is caused by the fact that your prospective clients know that your cost basis is the same, resulting in a lot of pressure on your pricing.Costs + The Value You AddBut the difference between your price and your competitor’s price is only one thing: the difference in the value that you add. Your price is X plus the value that you add. Your competitor’s prices is X plus the value that they add.Your job as a sales person (or as a sales organization) is to focus on creating the value that makes you worth paying more to obtain.This doesn’t mean that it’s ever easy to compete in this situation. But it does mean that some of your competitors will choose to subtract value in order to capture market share. Instead of trying to be best-in-class, world-class, or exceptional in any way, these sales organizations will subtract value in an attempt to be just good enough. They treat their offering as if it’s a commodity, and so some segment of your market (probably too larges a segment) will choose to believe that you sell as a commodity.The UpsideThere is an upside to this problem. The subtraction of value creates dissatisfaction.If your prospective clients suggests that price is most important, you can test that theory by asking them if they’re willing to give up service, support, the business results they really need, or any of the things that make you a strategic partner. Invariably, mature business people will answer that all those other factors are important to them, and probably more important than price.But you will run into the rare few who will say the price is the most important factor of all. They suffer under the persistent delusion that they can have all of the things that come along with the higher price by still choosing the lowest priced provider. These dream never come true, and the people and companies by this way suffer from an equally persistent dissatisfaction. And when the pain is great enough, they mature and make the necessary investments.Your price is X plus the value you create. It has nothing to do with your competitor’s price. The case that you need to make is that you can and will create the additional value you are trying to capture.last_img read more

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