Hundreds of Donegal families cannot afford to lose the services of ParentStop – Donegal Senator

first_imgA Donegal Senator has stated that the hundreds and hundreds of Donegal families who have benefitted from the ParentStop service over the last 13 years, cannot afford to lose it.Senator Pádraig Mac Lochlainn was appealing to the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Katherine Zappone directly during a special debate on the matter in the Seanad today.ParentStop supported over 400 Donegal families last year and has announced that it will have to close its doors at the end of this year, due to an ongoing lack of secure funding resources for the service. Senator Mac Lochlainn said: “This is a vital service for so many families across the county. Established in 2005 from within the community of Donegal and funded from 2007 to date, the team at ParentStop have been a safe space for parents struggling with their responsibilities for a variety of reasons. They are a free and voluntary service operated on a not for profit basis.“It is a self-referral service for families but a range of professionals and officials have referred struggling families to the service including teachers, counsellors, health care and social care professionals as well as family court judges.For years now, they have struggled to find the necessary funding from government agencies to sustain what has been a growing service and they have been forced into this announcement that they will have to close their doors”.“Today I appealed to Minister Zappone to meet with the board of ParentStop and to work with the HSE and other government departments and agencies to find a sustainable funding solution that will keep the doors open. I am pleased that the Minister has confirmed that she will meet the board of ParentStop later this month and that Tusla and the HSE are working on a joint funding proposal. “It is critical now that these efforts succeed and that the hundreds of Donegal families who rely on ParentStop are not abandoned by the state”.Hundreds of Donegal families cannot afford to lose the services of ParentStop – Donegal Senator was last modified: November 5th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Parentstoplast_img read more

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Fishing the North Coast: Rain will kick-off late run of fall kings

first_imgThe season’s first sizeable storms are finally filling our local rivers with fresh rainwater. And that means hard-charging, fresh from the salt king salmon – big and bright – will be making their way up all of our coastal rivers starting now. So, if you see a family member duck out early on Thanksgiving Day, or fail to show up, now you’ll know why. A steady stream of drift boats heading north on hwy.101 is also a pretty good indicator.The Smith and Chetco should be fishable on Friday, but both …last_img

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Where Are You on YOUR Cultural Competence Journey?

first_imgYours in learning,Brigitte Scott, Ph.D.Director of Program Development and EvaluationMilitary Families Learning [email protected] We are just a week away from the start of the virtual conference! Are you ready? No matter where you are with your own cultural competency skills, this conference and all those participating in it are here to support you and your growth. Cultural competence is a journey—a commitment to exploring ourselves, the world around us, our actions in it, and how our actions impact others. No matter where you find yourself along your cultural competence trajectory, this year’s conference will have so much to offer you. Building our cultural competence takes a multi-pronged approach to learning and behavior change. As I’ve been speaking with presenters and watching the conference sessions unfold, I am reminded that one of the many ways we can think about building cultural competence—no matter our previous experiences with it—is to think about hard and soft skills.As professionals, we all work to build both hard and soft skills in our daily activities at work and in our communities. Hard skills are things that we can learn, measure, and test; they are often skills that we need to do our jobs and do them well. This year’s conference is certain to support us in building our hard skills around cultural competence: we’ll be learning and talking about key terms such as privilege and oppression, power, micro-aggressions, and disparities. We’ll better understand the difference between equality and equity, learn about the social and medical models of disability, and take a hard look at data that shed light on inequities from several angles. We’ll walk away with assessment tools and frameworks that will help us provide the best possible services to the diverse families we work with. All of this knowledge will inform our daily activities and support increased cultural competence in our professional responsibilities, helping us to become successful allies and advocates. But so much of building our cultural competence lies in soft skills—those skills that are important to us as individuals, define who we are, and provide insights into our personalities, our priorities, and our authentic selves. These are leadership and communication skills; things like creativity, how we handle conflict, and how we make decisions; and include qualities such as flexibility, confidence, and work ethic. Though not an exhaustive list, these are some of the soft skills we’ll have opportunities to explore and develop over the course of the virtual conference, with the hope that we’ll be prepared and motivated to continue the journey long after the conference is over. We’ll engage in self-reflection, sharing, authentic communication, handling conflict, and practicing awareness. While we won’t get to exchange knowing nods or have coffee in person, we will have plenty of opportunities to interact with each other. We’ll have the usual chat box during the conference sessions, and the ability to private message friends, colleagues, and new additions to our professional networks. But this year, to support the building of those essential soft skills, we have a few more opportunities for you to take advantage of. Have you seen or are you already participating in the Storytelling for Cultural Competence pre-conference journaling activity to begin practicing self-reflection and awareness? You can start this journaling experience at any time. It is self-paced, and will continue throughout the conference. You’ll notice guiding questions that you’ll see in each conference session as well as in the conference journal, providing opportunities for you to reflect on prior knowledge, and help you get ready to contribute to meaningful conference conversations. Have you had a chance to sign up for and participate in the conference forum, where you can share and dialog with others? This is a forum open to conference participants only, and will be a private and safe space to share experiences, network, and reflect. Throughout the conference, we’ll be here participating along with you in our own journeys of cultural competence. But we’ll also be here to see what our learning network can offer those of you who are really looking to continue your journey with those you’ve engaged with during the conference. What WILL happen after the conference when you take all you’ve learned back to your workplace? What will it be like? Will you get to practice your new skills? Will you have support? We don’t know the answers to those questions, but as educators and professionals committed to high-quality professional development opportunities, we want to be there with you to find out. We want to know what we can do to help. And so after the conference, we’ll be looking for ideas from you: What do you need? How can we assist you? One of my most favorite things about my job is that I get to think about how we can help you—help each other—be lifelong learners. I want to know what we at the MFLN can do to help you on your learning paths with the resources we have. Don’t be shy! Let us know!One more exciting bit to share is that my colleague Alicia Cassels has developed a wonderful podcast series called Show Up Inspired. Her podcasts focus on how professionals can bring their best selves to our work. Cultural competence, hard skills, soft skills—these are all a part of that. But so is self care. So is building our personal networks. So have a listen on your commute, or while you work out, or fold laundry. Alicia will be continuing to develop this podcast series this year, with the idea that it will be appealing to all our network participants, much like having an issue-based conference on cultural competency. So please, join us, whenever you can, however you can. “Bring” your colleagues, spread the word, and maybe even reserve a conference room for your department so you can all participate together. We’ll be offering free continuing education credits to social workers, case managers, and registered dietitians for most of the sessions. I hope to see you next week, and look forward to learning not just with you, but from you.last_img read more

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In a Single Second You Can Decide – Episode 90

first_imgIt may take 90 days to create a habit, but it only takes one second to decide. You can decide right now to do what is going to have the greatest impact on your future, or you can decide to choose comfort.Subscribe to My YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/iannarino_Bio: Anthony Iannarino is a bestselling author and internationally recognized speaker on sales, success, personal development, leadership, and entrepreneurship. Anthony’s 3 privately held staffing firms generate annual revenues of $50M. These firms serve some of the most well-recognized brands in the United States. Anthony speaks to and provides transformational workshops to sales organizations throughout the world.His blog, www.thesalesblog.com, is read by 60,000 people each month, and he has published there daily since 2009. His widely acclaimed Sunday newsletter reaches 80,000 people.Anthony has continually been named one of the 25 most influential people in the world in sales and marketing._Subscribe to my Sunday Newsletter for Exclusive Content: https://thesalesblog.com/newsletterRead the Daily Blog: https://thesalesblog.comListen to the In the Arena Podcast: http://apple.co/2jlSKMr_Stay Connected Online:LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/iannarinoTwitter: http://www.twitter.com/iannarinoFacebook: http://www.facebook.com/thesalesblogInstagram: http://www.instagram.com/iannarinoSnapChat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/iannarinoSolutions Staffing: http://www.solutionsstaffing.comIannarino Fullen Group: http://www.iannarinofullen.comlast_img read more

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