JUST IN: City of Evansville Parking For Rathbone Revisited

first_imgMayorGood morning.  I left a voicemail with your secretary on Friday (26 July 2019) afternoon and wanted to follow up with you via email.To date I have kept every promise I have made to the City.I have taken a historic landmark that was previously derelict, purchased it for around $2M from a local bank and invested another approximately $2M to successfully restore it to its former grandeur as promised.  Over 90 percent of the approximately $2M renovation budget utilized services provided by local construction, architectural, engineering and other businesses as promised.Despite this am continuing to struggle to open-up the newly renovated units at the Rathbone, due to continuously needing to re-verify with APC that sufficient parking spaces are available.  This despite APC’s 31 May 2019 concurrence at the site review, wherein they acknowledged that the site had sufficient parking to open the majority of the units in the original building.I just need 22 more Certificates of Occupancy to complete the Rathbone’s leasing requirements.  Given my experience to date, I am anticipating having to fight for every inch of ground; and expend even more time and capital to obtain these remaining certificates.Frankly, there are too many City review boards and, those that occur, do not generate clear understanding of the requirements.  The resulting decisions from these hearings are not clearly recorded and/or certified by APC so all parties have a clear understanding of the requirements.  Trying to lock down what APC exactly requires has been a confusing, bureaucratic and cumbersome process.  This entire experience has added unnecessary cost and time delays to my project, which inhibit the downtown redevelopment efforts.  As I previously said, it also wastes taxpayer money by having numerous unproductive APC meetings that resolve little and trigger numerous/excessive City inspections.The time and effort associated with this is ridiculous.  Especially in light of the fact that officials have acknowledged that the parking code is out of date and is currently being updated.  As my existing parking lot at the Rathbone sits over half empty, I struggle to get permission to market and lease up vacant units.  Despite the fact that I have; 1) purchased the adjacent lot, 2) received a change of use to use it as a parking lot, and 3) began the process of clearing this new lot to use as overflow parking.  I only have about 20 of our 57 units rented.  It is extremely unlikely that I will be at full occupancy before I can open the overflow parking, which should be done by the end of September 2019 (at the latest).  By some miracle, even if my team achieved full lease-up, the reality is that over half of my tenants (even the 2 bed units) will only have one car.  So right now, I have over 70 parking spaces for about 15 cars, with an additional 70 plus parking spaces being added in the next 30-60 days, but I am still having to beg APC to open up my vacant units because I don’t have sufficient parking!  This does not even include the overflow parking arrangement I have secured with Culver school; that I had modified and recorded to meet APC’s requirements.There is no reason I should not be able to open up all of my units for lease so long as I keep our promise to open up the additional parking.  So far we’ve kept every promise we’ve made.  Yet, despite this fact, I am still being penalized continuously, while neighboring apartment complexes sit in states of vast disrepair to include cracked parking lots and poor signage.  I am unsure why the City’s enforcement is so arbitrarily placed upon those who are trying to do good for the community while absent for others.  I am hard pressed to see how this benefits the downtown redevelopment efforts.With this said, I am beyond frustrated with APC’s antiquated and bloated bureaucracy.  This process has been so painful I am reconsidering moving forward with my additional $20M anticipated investment in other areas of the City.  To date, I am unsure how many thousands of dollars my investment group has incurred in our ongoing discussions with APC.I am aghast that I am yet again having to ask you for help in addressing this ongoing issue so I can successfully move forward with this small project.  We would much rather be working to do further good for the neighborhood.  Instead, we are still spending our time fighting with City agencies, who should be our partner in these endeavors.***Highest Regards,ShannonShannon Huffer Esq.Broker, Attorney, Investor, Entrepreneur FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Developer of Rathbone Frustrated With APC’s Antiquated And Bloated BureaucracySubject: Rathbonecenter_img Councilman Weaver,The Site Review Committee met with the owner/developer in March of 2018 that our office had set up to help introduce the project, the ownership team, and the agencies that were involved in the permitting process.  At that time, the owner described the project and what their proposed uses were for the building.  Based on the information received, each agency laid out what items would be expected to be presented at the Site Review meeting for approval.  In addition, some of the main items discussed where the parking requirements, variances that could be requested, sewer/water/grease trap items, redevelopment approval, etc.  All agencies involved in the process were there to help this project through the necessary requirements along with providing detailed information from each agency.  On October 29, 2018, 7 months later, the first set of plans were submitted for review by the Site Review Committee, i.e. Phase 1 of the project.  During a walkthrough by the Building Commission, Fire Department, and the Area Plan Commission, it was discovered that the owner had already done some extensive work without having any permits.  Even though this activity had happened, the Site Review Committee moved forward to try and keep this project on track.  On November 7, 2018, an Improvement Location Permit was issued for the project so that it could continue to move forward.  At that time, several items were discussed with the owner including parking requirements for future Phases along with items required by the Evansville Water & Sewer Utility since the facility did not have easements for the sanitary sewer system.  Since that time multiple sets of plans along with multiple different scenarios have been presented to the agencies that sit on Site Review.  On February 25, 2019, Phase 2 of the project was submitted for Site Review Approval.  During the time between Phase 1 and Phase 2, a variance request was approved for parking on the project which would relax the number of required parking spaces from 122 to 86, which allowed for additional units to go in along with 4 hotel units and office space.  Based on the plans that were provided, which showed an additional parking lot to be built to meet the variance approval, a permit was issued on February 28, 2019.  The existing parking lot that is currently in place has a total of 71 parking spaces.  Based on the variance that the owner requested and showed on the plan that was provided and approved by the BZA and the Site Review Committee, the additional parking lot would provide the 86 spaces required.  To date, that parking lot has yet to be built and has been shown on several different locations on the site. In addition, the shared parking agreement with Culver school that was recommended by the City government to help the owner in their future plans has yet to be provided for approval.  By no means has any agency tried to slow this project down, and in fact, each agency has tried to help nail down a moving target.To date, the Area Plan Commission has approved each request for a Certificate of Occupancy after the proper information has been submitted.  If you would like to discuss this project in more detail, I would be happy to meet and pull all the information on the project along with the multiple sets of plans that we have had to work with.Additionally, since I have become the Area Plan Commission Director, the parking requirements in the downtown business district have been eliminated for all commercial developments and the residential component has been greatly reduced by the addition of the ability to share parking or to be within 300’ feet of a public parking area.  The Arts Overlay Zone, Jacobsville Overlay Zone, and West Franklin Street Overlay Zones have been created, have helped reduce parking requirements and have been completed through a properly vetted process by the entire community.  Pushed for the last several years, we have finally received funds this year by the County and City Councils to hire a consultant to update our antiquated codes.  I could not agree more that this review has needed to occur.  We look forward to working with everyone through this process, which should include our entire community since it will affect everyone!Thank You,Ronald S. London, P.E., CFM– Executive DirectorFOOTNOTE: IT SEEMS LIKE AREA PLANNING COMMISSION EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, RONALD LONDON LETTER WAS MOTIVATED BY THE ATTACHED LETTER POSTED BELOW WRITTEN BY SHANNON HUFFER , ESQ., Shannon Huffer Esq.Broker, Attorney, Investor, Entrepreneur OF THE RAthborne THAT WE POSTED SEVERAL DAYS AGO.last_img read more

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U.S. birth weights dip

first_imgThirteen-pound babies may make headlines, but they aren’t the norm. In fact, U.S. infants are getting smaller, according to researchers at the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute’s Department of Population Medicine, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School. Their findings, published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, suggest that birth weights in this country have declined during the past 15 years.The study analyzed data on birth weight, maternal and neonatal characteristics, obstetric care, and other trends from the National Center for Health Statistics Natality Data Set, looking at 36,827,828 U.S. babies born at full-term between 1990 and 2005. Birth weight — a combination of fetal growth and length of gestation — was recorded in grams. The investigators teased out certain factors, including the mother’s age, race or ethnicity, education level, marital status, and tobacco use, as well as the amount of weight the women gained during pregnancy and how early in pregnancy they received prenatal care. They also considered the women’s risk of conditions such as hypertension and use of obstetric procedures such as induction of labor and Caesarean delivery.Their findings came as a surprise. “Previous studies have shown that birth weights have increased steadily during the past half century,” said Emily Oken, Harvard Medical School assistant professor of population medicine. “We expected to see a continuation of those increases.” Higher birth weights have been attributed in part to women’s increasing age and weight and decreased smoking.Instead, Oken and her colleagues found that birth weights had decreased by an average of 52 grams (1.83 ounces) between 1990 and 2005. Decreases were especially notable after 1995.In contrast to previous research findings, birth weights fell even further in infants born to a subset of women considered to be at low risk for small babies. Mothers who were white, well-educated, married, didn’t smoke, received early prenatal care, and delivered vaginally with no complications had babies who weighed an average of 79 grams (2.78 ounces) less at birth during the study period.The causes of this decline remain unclear. In addition to declines in birth weight, average gestation length among these full-term births also dropped by more than two days. “A logical conclusion might be that trends in obstetric management, such as greater use of Caesarean delivery and induction of labor, might account for these decreases in birth weight and gestation length,” said Oken. “However, our analysis showed that this was not the case.”While the decline may simply represent a reversal of previous increases in birth weights, it may also be cause for concern. Babies born small not only face short-term complications such as increased likelihood of requiring intensive care after birth and even higher risk of death, but they may also be at higher risk for chronic diseases in adulthood.Future research may identify factors not included in the current data that might contribute to lower birth weight, such as trends in mothers’ diets, physical activity, stress, and exposure to environmental toxins. “There’s still a lot we don’t know about the causes of low birth weight, said Oken. “More research needs to be done.”The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.last_img read more

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Of two minds

first_imgWe resolve to exercise more, but end up in front of the TV at the end of the day instead of at the gym. We promise to clean up our diet and then overindulge at the office holiday party. We pledge to put money away for retirement, but end up maxing out credit cards that charge 14 percent interest.According to David Laibson, Robert I. Goldman Professor of Economics at Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), we struggle with ourselves in these ways and others because of the conflict between our two minds — one patient and forward-looking, another impatient and bent on immediate gratification. Laibson presented this model of “multiple selves” to an enthusiastic audience that filled Yenching Library on Dec. 2 for the 2010-11 Mind Brain and Behavior Distinguished Harvard Lecture.Laibson began his presentation by engaging the audience in an experiment: Imagine you’re at a spa right now. You’re offered two options—a 15-minute massage now or a 20-minute massage in an hour. Both are free. Which would you choose? About a third of the audience chose immediate gratification.Then Laibson made one change to the scenario. Imagine that the clerk at the spa offers you a 15-minute massage in one week at 2 p.m. or a 20-minute massage on the same day at 3 p.m. Although the interval between the massages was the same, the audience unanimously chose to wait the extra hour and get the 20-minute treatment.For traditional economists, this result makes no sense. “According to classical economic theory, consumers should discount future benefits at a constant exponential rate,” Laibson said. “The value of a reward should decline at a constant rate, regardless of the horizon.” Translation: If an earlier massage is preferred today than it should also be preferred in a week.Yet Laibson presented study after study that contradicted this prediction. Dutch workers choose healthy snacks one week in advance, then flip-flop and choose chocolate on the day of delivery. Students choose lowbrow movies to watch tonight, but schedule highbrow films for a week from now.“Research shows that there’s a high rate of discounting in the short run, then virtually no discounting as people look further into the future,” he said. “A student thinks about when to do a problem set. ‘If I do it today, I pay full price in terms of the psychological effort. If I move it one day into the future, it becomes half as miserable in expectation.’ But then the student reaches the day of action, and postpones the work once again.”Laibson said that the source of this internal struggle lies in two parts of the brain that literally sit on top of one another. The mesolimbic dopamine reward (MDR) system is concrete and immediate. This part of the brain will “gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today,” as Popeye’s sidekick Wimpy used to say, because Tuesday doesn’t really matter.Above the MDR system, though, is the prefrontal cortex (PFC). This part of the brain sees tomorrow essentially the same as it sees today. The PFC is that voice in your head telling you that the cupcake you want to scarf down at the holiday party is going to wind up around your midriff, so better steer clear. It’s the part of us that nutritionists and counselors are speaking of when they tell us to “eat mindfully.”“The cortical system has an ability to wait and weigh benefits,” Laibson said. “There’s very little discounting. The PFC is the part of the brain that says we shouldn’t mortgage the future for the present. The MDR discounts rapidly. It puts a lot of weight on the present, but little on the future.”Brain scans provide more evidence. In one study, participants were broken up into two groups. One group was asked to choose between a $20 Amazon.com gift certificate in a month and a $30 gift certificate in two months. Another was offered the same set of choices, only the time frame for the two gift certificates was now and one month. Pictures of the brains of participants offered the immediate gratification consistently showed activity in the mesolimbic area. Those offered choices in the future showed much less MDR activity.“The patient brain seems to be discounting about 1 percent per minute,” Laibson explained. “But the impatient brain has a 4 percent minute-to-minute discount rate. The combined function produces paradoxical behavior.”So, how can we quiet the part of our brain that wants to blow up our holiday budget and put that iPad on the credit card? Laibson had no easy answers, but quoted another study that may help households and policymakers create systems that reinforce the patient brain.Participants were given a budget and asked to spread their money over two accounts. Both paid 22 percent interest. One was a “freedom” account. People could withdraw and spend money whenever they liked. The other was a “commitment” account. Here people were allowed to set their own withdrawal date. In one arm of the study, the early withdrawal penalty was 10 percent; in a second arm it was 20 percent; and in the third arm of the study no withdrawals were allowed before the early withdrawal date. People in the “no withdrawal” arm put a much larger percentage of their money into the commitment account than those who faced a 10 or 20 percent penalty for early withdrawal.As it happens, 10 percent is precisely the penalty savers are charged for withdrawing money from a standard 401(k) retirement plan. With this in mind, Laibson left the audience with a question that gave a nod to the midterm elections and opposition to government social welfare efforts.“If people want commitment — and they seem to want it — what kind of system should we build?” he asked. “What would the world look like if people could build their own commitments? These are the questions that we should be answering if we’re not comfortable with the heavy-handed paternalism that Americans seem to reject.”last_img read more

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Celebrating 50 years of practice

first_img Celebrating 50 years of practice Florida lawyers recall the profession a half century ago Britt Dys Assistant Editor From human cannon balls to judicial canons, and the evolution of the language of math to the logic of law was how the journey began for a few of The Florida Bar’s 50-year members.They all became Florida lawyers in 1954, but traveled many different paths to get there. Rene Zacchini, a circus star turned judge; Stephen Grimes, a math wiz who reached the Florida Supreme Court; and Manuel Zaiac, a Cuban immigrant, are just three of the 69 members of the graduating class of 1954 who were honored at The Florida Bar’s 50-Year Member Luncheon June 25, during the Bar’s Annual Meeting (after this News went to press).Zacchini, a former circuit judge, came from a legacy of trapeze artists and human cannon balls. But he traded physical for verbal gymnastics when he decided to become a lawyer. His family shot to fame as the “The Flying Zacchinis” starring with Ringling Brothers and later headlining their own carnival.It was decided by Zacchini’s father that of his five children, the last two would go to college.Since he was the youngest, it was deemed that his future profession would not include a safety net. But that didn’t stop him from performing with his family on semester breaks from college.After completing law school in 1954 he was drafted into the army — and back into the acrobatic life. Zacchini completed basic training, and because of his family background in entertainment, he spent most of his time doing shows in special services.“I was doing an act with my brother,” he said. “A comedy trampoline act that together with other acts was sort of a variety show.”He traveled with a unit entertaining troops at various bases across the country and overseas in the Far East. Of his time under the big top he said, “I had a wonderful time in that business, but I felt at that time that the law profession was something that was appealing to me, and that’s what I did.”After his tour of duty, Zacchini set up an office in Tampa and later served for four years as a state representative for Hillsborough County.Lonely Work In the 1970s he was a judge of the 13th Circuit, and although he maintains that it was interesting work, he missed the camaraderie of lawyers.“It was a very somber type occupation. You know when you’re a lawyer you have a bunch of friends — comrades in the profession,” Zacchini said. “But when you become a judge, it’s not the same anymore because in a sense you’re sort of isolated with the other members of the bench.”Since hanging up his robe, Zacchini has noticed some changes in the profession.“When I first started practicing, there was absolutely no advertising permitted. It was unethical and you weren’t allowed to do it,” Zacchini said. “It went from nothing to people being on the back of phone books, and television ads several times a day. For my taste, I think it’s stretching it a bit.”Advertising would be all right if, in a tasteful manner, it lets the general public know what sort of services are available, Zacchini said.“But some people, like in all other things, they overdo.”Now he is content living in Sarasota with his “little boat,” glad that he no longer has to put in the strenuous hours the profession requires. He has been retired now for almost 20 years.Still Going Strong July 1, 2004 Assistant Editor Regular News Celebrating 50 years of practicecenter_img While sandy beaches and blue waters may bring happiness to most, fellow 50-year member and former Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice Stephen Grimes said, “I really don’t know how to retire. I get edgy just sitting around. I don’t really want to spend all my time doing leisure things.”That was apparent during recent oral arguments when Grimes represented The Florida Medical Association.Striking up a match of tennis can only keep him busy so long, and he doesn’t like to sit around the house without a constructive task, “I get discontented and want to do something.”After retiring from the court, Grimes returned to work at Holland & Knight in Tallahassee— his same employer out of law school — except back then it was called Holland Bevis McCrae & Smith and it was in Bartow.It was not “an instantaneous revelation” that lured Grimes away from his accounting books in college, but a “gradual realization” that the law interested him.“The more courses I took the majesty of the law and the logic of it appealed to me. . . the logic of the law to resolve disputes,” he said.He may not be able to define the catalyst that inspired his career, but Grimes is concise when describing how the practice of law has changed over the span of the last 50 years. He said that in some ways the practice of law has become more complicated. Grimes noted the numbers. More people — more law.“There is so much more government regulation and people rubbing against each other creates conflict,” he said.Lawyer advertising is also a source of regret for the former justice, “I think that the public is probably dis-served rather than served by it.”Another concern is how the adversarial nature between lawyers has grown over the years, saying that “often times there is a little more hostility in litigation then they used to be.”But he is quick to add that he is still proud of the bar and of lawyers’ place in society.“There have been many changes and not all of them happy changes; nevertheless, I think that society is well-served by the lawyers we have.”Grimes summed up his sentiment of the profession of law: “I think without lawyers our country, well, we just couldn’t have the freedoms that we have.”From Cuba to Florida Manuel Zaiac’s family moved to Florida from Cuba in 1945. He said his mother visited Miami Beach in the 1930s and liked it. She thought that the U.S. would be a nice place to raise a family.With a mind geared toward number crunching in college, Zaiac became a CPA before becomming a lawyer. He said his father, who was in real estate and before that a merchant, gently suggested the idea of law school: “We could use an attorney (in the family); what do you think?”Not all students are meant to survive the rigors of law schools, according to Zaiac, and the good teachers weed out those who don’t have the capacity to be lawyers. He had a pleasant experience while in law school at the University of Miami, but Zaiac said the tougher the professor the better.“Some of the professors were tough as hell, but, well, that’s expected. You’ve got to shake the tree a little bit to get rid of some of the guys who can’t cut it,” he said.A seasoned professor himself, having taught 45 years in the accounting department at UM, he has seen a greater number of women entering the legal profession through the decades.“Tremendous increase, and very welcome increase from the female sex,” he said. “I think they’re smart. I think the girls are going to take over.”During his career as an attorney, his knowledge of statutes has helped him achieve some noble deeds. He is most proud of playing an instrumental part in having the Cuban expropriation losses accepted by the Internal Revenue Service.“That saved the Cuban immigrants millions of dollars,” Zaiac said, adding the way it works is that “if a Cuban comes to the U.S., with no intention of going back, green card or not, any property confiscated by the Cuban government after he touches American ground is really an American taxpayer’s assets. So he’s entitled to the loss.”Although Zaiac enjoys listening to classical music and fishing in his spare time, don’t expect him to retire any time soon. His wife won’t hear of it, he says. If he hangs around the house too long, she claims it drives her crazy.“My wife says that if I retire she’ll divorce me,” he said.Anyway, Zaiac says practicing law is the salve to a quick and robust mind. “It keeps me young — it keeps me on the ball.”last_img read more

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Bicyclist Killed in N. Lindenhurst Car Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County police are investigating a car crash that killed a bicyclist in North Lindenhurst Tuesday  night.Police say at 9:25 p.m. a 61-year-old West Babylon man was riding his bicycle southbound on Wellwood Avenue when he attempted to cross Berry Street, and his bicycle collided with a 2006 Volkswagen also traveling southbound on Wellwood Avenue.The man was transported via North Lindenhurst Rescue to Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip where he was pronounced dead. The victim’s name is not being released pending notification of family members.The driver of the vehicle, Michael Edwards, of Wheatley Heights, remained at the scene. Edwards, 36, was not injured and there were no charges filed.The vehicle was impounded for a safety check and the investigation is continuing.Detectives are asking anyone with information about the crash to call the First Squad at 631-854-8152.last_img read more

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Elmont Crash Leaves Teen Dead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 19-year-old Queens woman died when she was hit by a vehicle in Elmont on Tuesday night.Nassau County police said Amaya D. George was walking across Dutch Broadway when she was struck by a Lexus at 9:30 p.m.The victim was taken to North Shore Long Island Jewish Hospital, where she died.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation but have deemed the crash to be non-criminal.last_img

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Sage advice from the business titans of “Shark Tank”

first_img 20SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Wendy Moody Wendy Moody is a Senior Editor with CUInsight.com. Wendy works with the editorial team to help edit the content including current news, press releases, jobs and events. She keeps … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details “Shark Tank”, the Emmy award-winning reality television series, returns this weekend with its ninth season. For those not familiar with the hit show, it showcases aspiring entrepreneurial contestants who pitch their business ideas to millionaire (or billionaire in some cases) “shark” investors. Many of us that watch the program may not dream of starting million-dollar business ventures, but we can gain much from the business advice shared by its enormously successful “shark” panel.Great ideas capture attention, but expertise is everythingContestants approach the panel with their initial business pitch, hoping to make a great first impression. Those that stand out immediately grab their audience’s attention and leave them wanting more. While this is an extraordinary first step in standing out from the crowd, smart businesspeople understand that the idea is not enough. In order to prove they are worth investing in, they must demonstrate their knowledge in what exactly it will take to see their venture to fruition.Egos are second to customer satisfactionProfessional businesspeople who have seen success have obviously showcased the moxie and strength needed for getting ahead. But, many also possess too-high opinions of themselves and their endeavors. When an arrogant contestant approaches the “sharks,” it is often instantly apparent that their ego is an issue and the customer comes second. While it’s important they be confident in themselves and their work, demonstrating a real interest in and true understanding of their target market is essential to establishing loyalty and trust.A plan for business growth is invaluableHaving a great idea and earning the interest of potential investors is noteworthy, but to actually sustain their support and the resources needed it’s essential to have a strong business plan in place. To really get others behind their work, professionals must constantly be looking to the next level. Even if the “sharks” are initially fascinated by a potential business idea, if they are not provided with a solid framework for every aspect of the company’s business model (often including, manufacturing, distribution, and pricing), their interest diminishes almost immediately. This is a lesson to professionals to keep looking ahead and to always map out exactly what it will take to meet their objectives.last_img read more

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Safeguard your members’ confidentiality

first_imgData breaches, hacked, stolen data and identity theft are all terms we’ve become accustomed to hearing.Unfortunately, it can be difficult to repair the damage these can cause to your reputation — especially if data compromises occur with social security numbers, birthdates, addresses or account numbers.Credit unions can perform a review of daily practices to help minimize the risks and protect member information from fraudsters. Unfortunately, member information can be easily compromised, and it often happens inadvertently. It can leak during business-hour conversations in public areas, through after-hours access to information. And, sometimes, it’s even leaked right in front of members.To help keep your members’ confidentiality secure, consider these tips: 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Keep member information confidential. Don’t leave member loan files, account cards or deposit slips on your desk or at your teller stations.Keep private conversations about members private. Avoid discussing members’ business in front of other members or use the other members’ names.Maintain detailed, documented procedures for identifying members over the phone and online. continue reading »last_img read more

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Ronald Korotaj: “Tourism is a young calf that can give a lot more milk”

first_imgThe Croatian hotel industry is the ‘locomotive’ of tourism and the overall economy, and its importance is not yet sufficiently understood, not even at the level of the Government, which takes small but still insufficient steps for a better investment climate and business sector, he said on Thursday. of the Congress of Hoteliers, the president of UPUHH, Ronald Korotaj, writes Lider.The two-day congress is organized by the Croatian Hotel Employers’ Association (UPUHH) and brings together numerous domestic and foreign hoteliers, representatives of tourism, state and financial institutions, consulting companies and others to discuss global trends and challenges, problems and ideas for better hoteliers.Due to the large share of tourism in GDP, which is significantly contributed by hoteliers with investment and overall business, tourism should be discussed at every session of the Government, which is seen as an ‘old cow that needs to be milked to the end’. ‘a young calf that can give a lot more milk’ ‘ Korotaj expressed himself pictorially.Among the measures advocated by hoteliers, he singled out, among other fiscal relief, better regulated labor legislation, adequate law on tourist land and 10 percent VAT, because it turned out that only with such a rate, investments accelerate. “Although the investment climate in Croatia is not yet good, hoteliers still have to continue investing because the market demands it, especially since ten new hotels appear in the world every day, which is more than 3600 a year. Investments are therefore necessary in Croatia to catch up with the world. “said Korotaj.Kristjan Staničić, Director of the Main Office of the Croatian Tourist Board (HTZ), also points out that the Government must recognize tourism and hospitality as the most important economic sectors, which need a stable legal and fiscal framework for further growth and development, and the CNTB will do everything it can to better promotion and positioning in the markets. The necessary synergistic approach of all in the community was considered important for this development by the Deputy Mayor of Zagreb Olivera Majić, who pointed out that more than 80 percent of overnight stays in Zagreb were realized in its 62 hotels, as well as that investments in new and renovation of existing hotels are being prepared. the capital. Envoy and advisor to the Croatian President Davorin Štetner warned of the problem of emigration, which is detrimental to finding labor for tourism and construction, without which there are no new facilities. “The most important thing is a stable regulatory framework, not that the rules change every year, with the example of reducing corporate taxes being a good direction for cutting and other levies because that would generate more revenue and we believe the government can. ” considers Stetner.Noting that Croatia is highly sought after by tourists, but also has a large public debt and still unfavorable financing conditions with costs up to five times higher than, for example, in Germany, Tomislav Čorak from the consulting company Boston Consulting Group believes that one of the solutions for ‘easier’ investing was a model of public-private partnership and ‘crowdfunding’, which is poorly applied in Croatia, and would be good, especially for tourism in cities and in smaller amounts. “Tourist demand for Croatia has grown 50 percent faster than globally in five years, and there is no doubt that it is an attractive destination, it may no longer need large promotional spots, but the problem is that in the last few years the increase in overnight stays was close to 10 percent , and the increase in the number of beds in hotels is only 2,5 percent. This indicates that we have entered this period a little unprepared for so much demand, hotel beds are now very much lacking, because without it there is no stronger season extension or higher revenues and this increased demand should be better used for investment in hotels.said Corak, reports Lider.The second day of the 20th UPUHH Congress began with the presentation of an analysis of the work of the Croatian hotel industry in the last 3 years, presented by the President of UPUHH Ronald Korotaj. The Croatian hotel industry grew by 2017 percent in 8,75, and our camping industry achieved almost the same growth. At the same time, Korotaj said, “private accommodation in Croatia has grown in double digits.” Tourism library.The President of UPUHH presented and commented on other figures related to the work of the Croatian hotel industry in the last 3 years.Business Review 2017Utilization of hotel capacities taking 9 months a year 2017. From June to September 5 stars 86-89%4 stars 83-86%3 stars 62- 85%Average price (euro) per room in 2017:2017. Stars June July August September                                 5 154 200 205 1434 89 129 137 793 75 105 112 63 Average room occupancy per room availability (revPar) in 2017:2017. Stars June July August September5 133 168 172 1284 73 111 125 683 61 93 99 54 Total revenue (euro) per room (TRevPAR) in 2017:2017. Stars June July August September5 193 232 239 1894 112 157 174 1023 87 126 133 77After the analysis, Ronald Korotaj concluded that it is up to all of us to take advantage of the opportunities provided by tourism. “We have difficulties, but let’s finally solve them, that is, the government should start listening to us!”- said Korotaj, and warned of a big problem due to lack of manpower. ” The Croatian Employment Service should establish a special office that would deal only with tourism. They must not think that they are the purpose of their existence and not the hotel industrySaid Korotaj.Source: Lider / Tourism library&lt;br /&gt;<br />
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