Congressman comes to campus to talk policy, inspire civic engagement

first_imgCRES negotiates move to interdisciplinary unit amid student resistance Twitter Facebook Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ printNext year’s midterm elections are still more than a year away, but the candidate who wants to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, is already stumping for votes. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso, stopped by campus Wednesday in an effort to appeal to those who have never voted. He talked with 30 people in the chambers of the Brown-Lupton University Union. “I’m making a bet for those who haven’t voted before,” O’Rourke said. “If we take a chance on them, they’re going to take a chance on us. Everyone deserves to be heard.” O’Rourke is mounting an underdog campaign. The last Democrat to win a senate seat in Texas was the late Senator Lloyd Bentsen who left office in 1993 to become Secretary of the Treasury. Add in that Cruz is an incumbent and the competition gets even harder. In 2016, 87 percent of senators won re-election and it was 82 percent in 2014, according to OpenSecrets.org. The congressman is taking this all in stride, launching a campaign that he said is focusing on the people instead of relying on money from special interests. O’Rourke said that money has a “corrosive” effect on elections so he is choosing not to take any money from Political Action Committees or Super PACs. O’Rourke is instead relying on the people of Texas and their individual donations to his campaign – the average of which is $44, he said. “We’re going to walk the walk, but run it in a different way,” O’Rourke said. “That’s why I’m here right now instead of following a Super PAC.” Anthony Deininger, the President of Young Democratic Leaders which co-sponsored the event, said O’Rourke was important to bring to campus because he is helping to fight the notion that Democrats can’t win in Texas.   “He faces some of the same challenges we do on campus with the state kind of thinking that everything is red,” Deininger said. “I think he is a great model to bring on campus to show the kind of fight that we’re fighting for.” Part of O’Rourke’s underdog candidate model focuses on appealing directly to voters instead of listening to campaign consultants. This is part of the reason he isn’t commissioning any polls. “What would the poll add to what we’re doing?” O’Rourke said. “I’m going to continue to talk about things I think are important. The best way for me to get a sense of what we’re doing is to keep traveling across the state.”O’Rourke said these in-person conversations he’s had on the campaign trail and at his monthly town halls have helped him learn more about his constituents and made him a “much better” representative. His in-person conversations Wednesday took him across a variety of policy issues, including a focus on immigration. O’Rourke talked about the decrease in apprehensions at the border between the year 2000, when there were around 1.6 million apprehensions, and 2016, when there were 400,000 apprehensions. O’Rourke argued that despite the documented increase in border security, members of congress still fixate on talking about border security instead of reforming the immigration system as a whole. Number of Nationwide ApprehensionsInfogram“The rhetoric connected to this versus the facts I am showing you right now is preventing us from going forward,” O’Rourke said. O’Rourke would also like to move forward on green energy, arguing that Texas’s high potential for solar energy brings the conversation to him. “Texas of all places in the world should take the lead on that,” O’Rourke said. “We need aggressive leadership to get us started.” This aggressive leadership is something O’Rourke promised to deliver on if elected, adding that he would never forget the Texans who got him there. O’Rourke said one of Cruz’s weaknesses is he started campaigning for president almost as soon as he was elected senator. O’Rourke took another swipe at his competition when answering a question about Twitter by alluding to when Cruz’s Twitter account liked a tweet which linked to a pornographic video. “I don’t want anyone to tweet for me or like anything for me,” O’Rourke said. “It’s run 100 percent by me.” This direct appeal to voters resonated well with many of those in attendance Wednesday. Graduate Student Joe Love, a registered Texas voter, said he was pleased by the congressman’s conversation.“I was super impressed,” Love said. “He talks about things I am super passionate in. He’s an all around a great candidate from my brief time with him here.” Several other students stopped O’Rourke after the scheduled talking time to go into more detail on a specific issue or to pose for a photo. One supporter questioned the congressman about the size of his bumper stickers, complaining that they were too small to be read from far away. O’Rourke’s campaign manager chimed in to say that new ones were in production and should be out next week.   O’Rourke used the opportunity to encourage everyone in the room interested in politics to get involved in a campaign, adding that he learned so much about politics from his time working on one as a freshly graduated college student.  Getting volunteers involved in politics is one of the main focuses of the other student organizations that co-sponsored the event, Women in Politics / Ignite, a non-partisan group. Women in Politics / Ignite Vice President Rachel Herrera said she hopes by bringing political speakers from both sides of the aisle she is able to convince more people to think critically and get involved in politics. “We like to open up that conversation to everyone because it does create such an important dialogue when you’re able to talk to people from both parties,” Herrera, said. “I’m really proud of how the event went today, we had really good questions from the audience.” O’Rourke ended up offering to be an unofficial campaign advisor to one of the Women in Politics / Ignite members if she decided to run for office. He said the key to a good campaign is getting to know the voters. “Folks just want to know you’re a good person and that they can trust you,” O’Rourke said. “Nothing can replace going and knocking on someone’s door.” Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ Linkedin ReddIt Linkedin Elizabeth Campbell Facebook + posts Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ Breakdown: Cambridge Analytica, information warfare Twitter Previous articleTCU Police are being ‘extra vigilant’ following attack of woman on Trinity TrailsNext articleVolleyball falls in Big 12 opener at West Virginia Elizabeth Campbell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Alumna joins ‘Survivor’ reality show in quest for a million dollars ReddIt Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Elizabeth Campbell is executive editor of TCU 360 and a senior journalism and political science double major. When not in the newsroom, she’s thinking about the news while probably watching TCU football or being a history nerd. Send her a tip if you have a story to share! WATCH: Former Chief of Staff for Obama talks Trump administration, Democrats, liberal arts educationlast_img read more

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Brazilian Army Trains Journalists to Work in Conflict Zones

first_imgBy Nelza Oliveira/Diálogo July 14, 2017 The Brazilian Army hosted a training session at the Joint Peacekeeping Operations Center of Brazil (CCOPAB, per its Portuguese acronym) from June 19th-23rd, in Deodoro, Rio de Janeiro, to prepare journalists to work in conflict zones. The course brought together 38 media professionals from across Brazil, including reporters, photographers, cameramen, producers, and editors from radio, television, newspapers, and websites, including a member of Diálogo. “The course was organized to provide journalists with the knowledge they need to work in armed conflict zones where there are United Nations (UN) peacekeeping forces. Members of the press will undoubtedly end up using much of the information provided in their life, in their daily routine,” explained Brazilian Army Major Anderson Félix Geraldo, the training coordinator. “The course is divided into lectures and practical training. The training’s objective is to provide press professionals with information and the precautions they need to take to report safely in those operational environments,” Maj. Félix added. The course, titled Preparation Phase for Journalists and Press Officers in Conflict Zones, is offered every year at CCOPAB. It was created in 2010 with the mission of preparing service members, police officers, and civilians from Brazil and partner nations to work in UN peacekeeping missions. The site is also called the Sérgio Vieira de Mello Center, in honor of the Brazilian diplomat in the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees killed in a 2003 attack in Baghdad. Journalists are selected based on an analysis of their application, or at the Brazilian Army’s invitation. Among the topics addressed in lectures by civilian and military personnel, most of whom have experience in UN peacekeeping missions, are: Analysis and Mitigation of Risk in Journalistic Coverage, taught by Captain Jorge Smith, a guest instructor from the Chilean Army; Communication and Negotiations, with Brazilian Army Sergeant Major Ádamo Adriano de Paulo, covering kidnapping and hostage crises, negotiation, and survival in captivity; and Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law, taught by military prosecutor Najla Palma. “Unfortunately, we have seen that being a journalist is one of the most dangerous professions in the world. Furthering the protection of these professionals is now on the international agenda, especially combatting the impunity for crimes committed against them,” Palma said. “It’s through journalists’ work that we are often able to prevent new international rights violations from happening, and we can bring them to light or scream to the world that violations are happening,” he said. Overcoming fear The journalists’ limits were tested on the outside activity field. At the Firefighters Special Instruction Center, trainees not only learned basic firefighting techniques, how to move around in a collapsed structure, first aid, and prehospital care in remote environments, but they also underwent a panic-control test. Groups of four students entered a warehouse with a dark, maze-like internal structure full of smoke and obstacles, simulating a place on fire with sounds inherent to these types of situations, like screams and sirens, from which they had to find a way out. At the Special Instruction School, trainees learned safety procedures followed at places with mines or chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear agents. They also experienced what it is like inside a room with tear gas. The journalists first entered with masks, then took off the protective equipment to learn what the gas felt like, and to control the panic. Next came the second part of the exercise – entering without a mask and putting on the equipment inside the gas-filled room. “Terrible, terrible, terrible! I’m feeling it on my skin, in my eyes,” said Gabriela Pavão, a journalist with the news site G1 in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, while running with open arms against the wind to reduce the gas’s effects. “I think the importance of this training is that we really learn that there is equipment like this [protective masks], that allows us to do our job in a conflict zone, in an area with gas, for example, with the safety that we need. At the time we get desperate but then see that the equipment really keeps us safe,” she added after recovering from the exercise’s effects. During instruction on an obstacle course in a built-up area at the Army’s Training Assessment Center, journalists simulated an advance in an armed conflict zone accompanied by UN service members. Using vests and helmets with sensors that detect when and where they were hit by bullets, the trainees crossed an urban area under crossfire. Visiting Carana Course organizers even created a fictional country to make the training more realistic. They called it Carana, a former French colony experiencing an armed conflict, with different ethnic groups fighting for control of a territory and power. The social and political developments of Carana’s history were shared with the students through the newspaper Carana’s News. On the penultimate day of training, journalists were thrust into the midst of a humanitarian crisis, with a UN mission attempting to enforce a peace agreement signed between the country’s government and rebel forces. Before beginning the mission to reach the Team Site where the UN observers are, and conducting an interview, the journalists also learned from Brazilian Army Captain Lucas Barros de Souza about types of weapons and their effects, and from Brazilian Army First Sergeant Allan Barbosa Alves how to prepare field rations consumed by service members on the mission, promptly served as the meal of the day. All this was done while wearing a nearly 15-kilogram bulletproof vest and a 2-kilogram protective helmet. Journalists arrived exhausted at Carana. According to Brazilian Army Colonel Carlos Augusto Ramirez Teixeira, the commander of CCOPAB, that’s the idea, so that trainees learn to respond well to risky situations under stress, in addition to making them aware of the conditions in which service members operate on missions. In a 2-kilometer square area, organizers set up four highly realistic scenarios of Carana, where journalists would have to put into practice everything they had learned over the previous few days. The exercise even included the soundtrack of what Carana’s urban area might sound like. Service members acted convincingly, wearing carefully applied makeup. The movie-like simulation involved 60 service members, 75 percent of CCOPAB’s staff, generators, military tents, trucks, ambulances, armored vehicles, and medical supplies. Trainees pass through an obstacle course in the midst of a shootout and provide first aid to victims of a car accident and mine explosion until they reach the Team Site. There are other surprises on the road to Carana, but the Brazilian Army prefers to keep them secret in order to not interfere with future courses. Suffice it to say that they involve a lot of shock, blood, adrenaline, and realism. “One of the really cool things about this course is it puts us in a practical situation, a reality that we’d otherwise unlikely experience without already being in a real-world situation. So, you get that feeling, a preliminary experience, in case you ever face a situation like that someday, it’s really important,” explained Tiago Eltz, a journalist from TV Globo. According to Lieutenant General Otávio Santana do Rêgo Barros, the head of the Army’s Public Relations Office, this interaction between service members and journalists, resulting from the training, is beneficial to both sides. “We equip the journalists to conduct themselves properly in conflict environments, whether that is one here in our country or another one outside of our country. And the best way for us to get our message across, whether the news is good or bad, and if it is bad to refute it, is through this transparent interaction with the journalists,” summed up Lt. Gen. Rêgo Barros.last_img read more

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4 ways to crank your creativity up to eleven

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details This is Spinal Tap. Just like a Spinal Tap amp, a creativity setting of “eleven” is surely better than “ten.” Right? Who knows really, but the point is, if you’re struggling to feel creative, you may be looking for a few tips to get the ideas flowing again. Here are four ways to crank that creativity up to eleven…Get sweaty: A good workout can be as good for your brain as it is for your body. Getting your blood pumping may be just what you need to get your thoughts flowing. Pop on some headphones, put on some good tunes, get your heart rate up, and watch your mind transform.Get uncomfortable: Every once in a while, you have to leave your comfort zone. Maybe you’re not initially stoked about the thought of waking up early in order to change your routine, but that change in your schedule may help get those creative juices flowing just the way you want.Get some face time: When you’re stuck, you may have the same thoughts circling round and round in your head. Spend some time with a friend or family member who supports you. It’s always a good idea to have someone to bounce ideas off of.Get away: Sometimes, our brains need a break. A great way to do this is to transport yourself to another place. Whether it’s a beach vacation or weekend Netflix binge, some time “away” may be just what you need to get your brain working the way you want it to again.last_img read more

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Russia coronavirus cases top 500,000

first_imgRussia, the country with the world’s third-largest coronavirus outbreak, passed the symbolic milestone of 500,000 confirmed cases on Thursday, after the capital lifted tight lockdown restrictions this week.The latest figures took the country’s total to 502,436 cases, after 8,779 new cases were recorded in the last day, a government website said.The most cases were reported in the two largest cities of Moscow and Saint Petersburg and their surrounding areas. The capital confirmed 1,436 new cases on Thursday as the numbers of new infections have significantly fallen this week.Moscow lifted restrictions including compulsory travel passes on Tuesday, a move welcomed by residents who rushed out to enjoy the streets and parks.Many other regions are lifting lockdown restrictions as Russia is preparing to hold a July 1 national vote despite the pandemic.   President Vladimir Putin is seeking public backing for constitutional amendments that would allow him to stay on at the Kremlin beyond his current term. Russia has confirmed a total of 6,532 COVID-19 deaths, a far lower mortality rate than in other countries with large outbreaks.Critics have cast doubt on the low official mortality rate and accused authorities of under-reporting to play down the scale of the crisis.Russia attributes its lower virus death figures to mass testing which has identified many cases with mild or no coronavirus symptoms. The health ministry is now adjusting how it reports numbers to include all deaths believed to be related to the virus even if the direct cause of death was another condition or the patient tested negative.Moscow reported Wednesday that it saw 5,260 such deaths in May.Former finance minister Alexei Kudrin, a liberal politician known for his outspoken comments, said Russia’s health system requires more funds and modernization in many regions.”Medicine is significantly underfunded even according to the current norms and also it needs a serious overhaul,” Kudrin, who heads the Audit Chamber that examines government spending, said in an interview with TASS state news agency.”We will carry out a check and show these figures,” he added.Nevertheless the economist said Russia “is not doing a bad job with the pandemic,” crediting the role of the military, which has built emergency facilities.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Record economic slumps hit Europe in face of resurgent virus

first_imgIn a sign of the trade-offs being forced on governments, Britain imposed new lockdowns in several northern counties Friday, just as Western Europe announced historic economic slumps that would have been nightmare scenarios at the start of the year. France’s economy contracted by 13.8 percent in the April-June quarter, mirroring similar devastation in Spain (18.5 percent), Portugal (14.1 percent) and Italy (12.4 percent). Europe as a whole saw gross domestic product (GDP) fall by 12.1 percent in the eurozone and by 11.9 percent across the Union bloc.”It is a shocking drop, but completely understandable as the economy was shut for a considerable period,” noted Bert Colijn, senior economist at ING Bank. Devastating economic data poured in Friday as nations counted the cost of efforts to contain the coronavirus pandemic, even as fresh spikes forced countries including Britain to put the brakes on a return to normality.Six months after the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a global emergency, the novel coronavirus has infected more than 17 million people and killed nearly 674,000, according to an AFP tally. As global daily cases approach the 300,000 mark, the impact is being felt in every sphere of life, with elections postponed in Hong Kong – the latest blow to its democracy activists – and the annual Muslim hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia performed with radically reduced numbers. Meanwhile, in the United States – the world’s biggest economy and hardest-hit nation – jobless Americans were bracing for an end to extra unemployment payments after Congress failed to reach a deal on extending benefits.It came just a day after the US posted a second-quarter GDP drop of 9.5 percent from the same period a year ago, the worst it had ever recorded.On Friday, the country recorded 1,442 new deaths, taking its overall death toll to 153,268.Billion-dollar pharma dealsOne sector that is not struggling is pharmaceuticals, as the world pins its hopes on the race for a vaccine. Pharma giants Sanofi and GSK announced they will receive up to US$2.1 billion from the US government to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. Sanofi has also struck a deal with the EU for 300 million doses if the treatment works. And the US-German pharma team-up of Pfizer and BioNTech signed a deal with Japan to provide 120 million doses of their vaccine contender.They kept the size of the deal under wraps, but the US government recently put the cost of 100 million doses from those firms at almost $2.0 billion.But many businesses are in freefall, with airline conglomerate IAG, the owner of British Airways, posting a first-half loss of 3.8 billion euros ($4.5 billion) and UK bank NatWest sliding into the red, while Dutch airline KLM and Swedish truck maker Scania each said they were shedding 5,000 jobs.Fresh lockdownsWhile strict European lockdowns were effective in bringing cases and deaths under control, an uptick in cases means the restrictions are far from over, even if they have become more localized and specific.Britain was the latest to impose new measures Friday, banning different households from meeting indoors across Greater Manchester, and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire. With large Muslim populations in those areas, the ban was painfully timed, on the eve of the Eid-al-Adha festival. “We take this action with a heavy heart, but we can see increasing rates of COVID across Europe and are determined to do whatever is necessary to keep people safe,” British Health Secretary Matt Hancock said on Twitter.Britain also delayed plans to reopen casinos, bowling alleys and skating rinks, due to begin on Saturday, while also putting off plans to resume indoor performances and increase stadium crowds. The sacred hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia has been held with 10,000 Muslim faithful allowed, instead of the roughly 2.5 million that attended last year.Pilgrims were brought in small batches into Mecca’s Grand Mosque, walking along paths marked on the floor, in sharp contrast to the normal sea of humanity that swirls inside its walls.Germany added three northern Spanish regions to its list of high-risk destinations, including the tourist hotspots of Barcelona and the beaches of the Costa Brava, meaning anyone arriving from those areas will have to produce a negative coronavirus test or go into quarantine for 14 days.Denmark reversed its stance on face masks, recommending them on public transport, while Colombia hits 10,000 deaths.”The pandemic is a once-in-a-century health crisis, the effects of which will be felt for decades to come,” WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Friday at a meeting to assess the situation six months after declaring a global emergency.Tedros has warned that young people should take greater efforts to stop the spread of the disease, and a new study found that hundreds of children in the US state of Georgia had contracted the virus at a summer camp last month.Topics :last_img read more

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Wolf Administration Highlights Investments to Bolster STEM Education

first_img Education,  Innovation,  PAsmart,  Press Release,  Public Health,  Schools That Teach Harrisburg, Pa. – State Education Secretary Pedro A. Rivera hosted the Conrad Weiser High School (Berks County) Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) team at the Capitol today, emphasizing that the team’s patent-pending medical technology is a fitting example for Governor Tom Wolf’s PAsmart initiative, a new $30 million program to improve STEM and computer science education and other jobs training opportunities.“Increasing opportunities for young people to prepare for careers in the fast-growing STEM fields is one of my top priorities,” said Governor Wolf. “With my PAsmart initiative, we are investing in the amazing capacity of our children and creating a talented and skilled workforce that we need now and in the future.”As part of the school’s Science Research Institute, the five-member team developed patent-pending medical technology designed to treat wounds and heal tissue. They designed a wound measurement app to record and document patients’ wounds. The captured image is then transferred to a 3D-printer for generating a personalized bioactive glass-embedded bandage. The bioactive glass composition helps to prevent infection and promote healthy cell proliferation.Secretary Rivera added that through the governor’s PAsmart initiative, Pennsylvania is investing $30 million in workforce development, including $20 million for STEM and computer science learning. The initiative encourages employers to collaborate with schools to develop educational programs that prepare students for in-demand jobs.“Expanding access to computer science and STEM programs prepares our students to succeed in an ever-evolving workforce,” Rivera said. “By connecting business and industry leaders with educators in our classrooms, we ensure our students are learning the skills that are in demand by Pennsylvania employers, specifically STEM and computer science professions.”Pennsylvania is a leader in STEM education, with the third largest number of nationally-recognized STEM ecosystems and producing the fifth highest number of STEM graduates. Regarding computer science, the commonwealth recently became one of a fewer than a dozen states to endorse computer science education standards. In June, PDE hosted the Computer Science for All Summit to engage hundreds of the state’s educators and administrators in developing and implementing innovative approaches to teaching computer science.Throughout the summer, PDE leaders are visiting educational camps, libraries, and colleges to highlight the importance of STEM education as part of the #SummerOfSTEM tour.For more information about this grant or Pennsylvania’s education policies and programs please visit the Department of Education’s website at www.education.pa.gov or follow PDE on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.NOTE: Video, audio, and photos from this event will be available for download later today in an email from the Pennsylvania Internet News Service (PINS). To register for PINS emails contact, [email protected] Wolf Administration Highlights Investments to Bolster STEM Education July 18, 2018center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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UK roundup: BT Pension Scheme, Accenture, HM Treasury

first_imgThe £40bn (€56.5bn) BT Pension Scheme (BTPS) has re-appointed Accenture to provide its administration system for its 300,000 members, extending the current arrangement for another eight years.Accenture has been the scheme’s provider since 2000, when the BT Group and Accenture launched a joint venture, with the outsourcing firm providing pensions administration alongside HR services such a payroll, training and recruitment.The scheme began reviewing the arrangement in 2013 and has appointed Accenture for an additional eight years.Accenture does not market itself as a third-party administrator to other UK pension schemes. It provided the service to BTPS as part of the wider deal with BT.However, it said it would continue building its capability to provide additional features to BTPS’s members, and grow its business in the UK.Chairman of the scheme, Paul Spencer, said the company was appointed on new terms after a full review of the market.“This new contract provides for further investment in the administration function to continue to enhance the service provided to members,” he said.In other news, the UK government has begun consulting with the pensions industry on whether to cap or ban charges placed on defined contribution (DC) pension scheme members when they transfer out a scheme.Since April, when HM Treasury brought in new freedoms to DC savers to access their savings as cash or income drawdown, the government grew concerned providers might restrict access by adding charges.HM Treasury is also assessing whether to cap fees by assessing what may be “excessive”, and whether charges deter members from accessing savings.The consultation runs for 12 weeks.Malcolm McLean, senior consultant at Barnett Waddingham, criticised the government consultation for being non-specific on what charges and controls it wanted to identify or implement.“[It is] more a case of kicking the ball down the road, pending further evidence, than anything else,” he said.last_img read more

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Random drug-testing bill set to be voted down by Government parties

first_imgNZ Herald 6 September 2018Government parties are set to vote down a bill that would introduce a random drugs test for drivers, prompting a call by the Automobile Association to come up with an urgent alternative to address a growing problem.“The AA has been calling for action on drugged driving since 2011,” said motoring affairs general manager Mike Noon, “and we urge the Government to announce its plan of action as quickly as possible.”Parliament began debating the Land Transport (Random Oral Fluid Testing) Amendment Bill last night which would allow the police to flag down any rider or rider for a saliva test for the presence of THC (cannabis), ecstasy or methamphetamine.But when the vote is held on September 19, Labour, the Greens and New Zealand First will vote it down.Family First has added its voice of support for roadside drug-testing of drivers, and called on the Government to change its mind and support the member’s bill.“We should take every measure possible to protect families and to reduce the road toll,” said national director Bob McCoskrie.READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=12120432&ref=twitterlast_img read more

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Italian Cup: Juventus, AC Milan cruise to last eight

first_imgShorn of stars Juventus, AC Milan still cruise in Italian Cup https://t.co/vv5mHOcw1B #FOOTBALL pic.twitter.com/srzDb5psld— Mr Derek Trottter (@MrDerekTrottter) January 15, 2020 Read Also: Ronaldo rivalry will be remembered forever, claims Messi Troubled Napoli eased into the quarters with a 2-0 win over Perugia thanks to two Lorenzo Insigne penalties. In the last eight, AC Milan will face Torino who beat Genoa on penalties last week. Juventus will play the winner of the last tie of the round, Roma at Parma on Thursday. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 In Tuscany, Spaniard Pol Lirola collected Erik Pulgar’s long pass before charging towards goal and slotting home his first Fiorentina goal six minutes from time, winning the tie for the hosts despite German Pezzella’s sending off 14 minutes earlier. Patrick Cutrone also scored his first goal for the club when he put Fiorentina ahead in the 11th minute of his first start since arriving on loan from Wolverhampton Wanderers last week. The away side scored a deserved leveller when former Fiorentina man Ilicic turned in a superb Ruslan Malinovskiy cross. But Lirola won the tie to set up a tough match with Serie A title chasers Inter Milan. The winner of that clash face either Lazio or Napoli in the semifinals. On Tuesday, Inter thumped Cagliari 4-1 with Romelu Lukaku scoring twice. Holders Lazio, who are on a club-record run of 10 straight wins in Serie A, made short work of Cremonese in their 4-0 victory in Rome. Cristiano Ronaldo was too ill to play, while Zlatan Ibrahimovic spent the evening resting on the bench, but even without their biggest stars, Juventus and AC Milan cruised into the last eight of the Italian Cup on Wednesday. Juventus beat visiting Udinese 4-0 in the late game, after Milan had dispatched SPAL, 3-0. Paulo Dybala lofted the ball into the far corner for the third Juventus goal In the first game of the evening, 10-man Fiorentina beat Atalanta 2-1. Ronaldo was sidelined after suffering an attack of sinusitis in the afternoon, but he is not the only ace in the Juventus pack. After 16 minutes, Paulo Dybala carved through Udinese with a series of quick one-twos, finishing with a couple of exchanges with centre forward Gonzalo Higuain. When his Argentine compatriot played a pass one little behind him, Dybala spun and floated the ball onto Higuain’s chest and he strode forward and scored. Ten minutes later, after Udinese goalkeeper Nicolas tripped Federico Bernardeschi. Dybala converted the penalty. Dybala scored a in the 58th minute, clipping the ball over Nicolas from the right edge of the box. Two minutes later Douglas Costa converted Juve’s second penalty after Bram Nuytinck handled. In Milan, Krzysztof Piatek, who is reportedly on the verge of a move to Tottenham Hotspur, outpaced the sluggish SPAL offside trap to give the home team the lead after 20 minutes. Samuel Castillejo curled a precise left-foot shot inside the far post just before half time. Krzysztof Piatek beat goalkeeper Etrit Berisha to give AC Milan the lead Fullback Theo Hernandez added a third in the 66th minute, surging upfield and smashing home a left-foot shot from just outside the penalty area.center_img Promoted Content7 Inventions Created To Start Saving The World6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A DroneCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowA Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of Art8 Weird Facts About Coffee That Will Surprise YouTop 10 Most Populated Cities In The WorldWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?10 Most Praised Historical Movies8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World Loading… last_img read more

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NFL Draft 2019: Ole Miss WR A.J. Brown to forgo senior year

first_imgA.J. Brown, potentially the first wide receiver off the board, will forgo his senior year Ole Miss and enter the 2019 NFL Draft, he announced Tuesday on Twitter.“The past three years I have created memories & friendships that will last a lifetime. … I’ll never forget the place that turned me into a man,” he wrote, in part. Thank you Ole Miss❤️ pic.twitter.com/J5Cn077S75— AJ Brown (@Brown1arthur) December 4, 2018Brown had 85 catches for 1,320 yards and six touchdowns as a junior, capping a career in which he had 19 TDs and 2,984 yards receiving. The SEC’s leading wide receiver by yardage and receptions in 2018, Brown was one of three unanimous first-team All-SEC selections announced this week. It marked his second consecutive year as a first-team All-SEC pick. Related News In addition to his football prowess, he was selected in the 19th round of the 2016 MLB Draft by the Padres and has participated in the team’s extended spring training each of the past three summers. NFL Draft 2019: Auburn QB Jarrett Stidham to turn prolast_img read more

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